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declaring character encoding

     
7:56 pm on Sep 29, 2005 (gmt 0)

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I am trying to validate my htm document. I have specified transitional HTML 4.01 and UTF-8 character encoding. When I attempt to validate using the W3C validator found at [validator.w3.org...] it fails my code because of the ampersand symbol in some of the sites I link to and because of the copyright symbol at the bottom of my pages. Is there a character encoding I can declare so it won't do this? Thanks.
8:36 pm on Sept 29, 2005 (gmt 0)

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This probably isn't a character encoding issue. Ampersands in links should be declared as & instead of &.
8:55 pm on Sept 29, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Thanks, that works. This site is awesome.
12:25 am on Sept 30, 2005 (gmt 0)

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For the copyright symbol, what is the error you are getting? Assuming the page is really encoded as UTF-8 (rather than being encoded as ISO-8859-1 but declared as UTF-8), then the symbol should validate fine.
12:33 am on Sept 30, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Use © instead for the copyright symbol.
12:27 pm on Sept 30, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Use © instead for the copyright symbol.

The thing is, if you are using UTF-8, then you shouldn't need to have to use the

©
character entity - unless the actual encoding of the page is not actually UTF-8. If the page is in English, for example, there is very little difference in usual circumstances, so you can't always tell at first.