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DNS change propagation timing

I'm still seeing old site after 46 hours

     
10:12 pm on Oct 19, 2003 (gmt 0)

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I have relocated sites in the past and the propagation has never taken more than a few hours before - nothing like 24 hours let alone 72 hours.
This time there is evidence in my traffic logs and doing a traceroute through Sam Spade (24 hours ago) that the new site was in use. But I still can't reach my new site from my computer nor download email.
I'm in Australia and I've moved this site to a US host from an Australian host. But a month ago I moved my main domain first with no such problems. The only difference this time is the registrar being different.
Does anyone else think this is strange?
10:30 pm on Oct 19, 2003 (gmt 0)

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I don't think it's really out of the ordinary. One site I moved took less than 12 hours and another one I moved took about 4 days(!) Needless to say being on the internet has forced me to become very ZEN and just wait out things like this...seems there's no "normal" length of time.

:)

10:42 pm on Oct 19, 2003 (gmt 0)

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This can happen. If your DNS records had a long TTL (Time To Live) prior to your move, they are still being cached somewhere. Nothing to do but wait - only comfort is that some parts of the world are seeing the new site already.

/claus

10:55 pm on Oct 19, 2003 (gmt 0)

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Yes it probably did have a long TTL. And I agree a ZEN approach is much better for the blood pressure. Thanks for your responses. :)
11:36 pm on Oct 19, 2003 (gmt 0)

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cherryl,

If you have a unique IP address (non-name-based hosting) you should be able to access your site by its IP address, i.e. [192.168.0.1...]

The same goes for ftp access.

Jim

11:54 pm on Oct 19, 2003 (gmt 0)

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Yes. I can access the site using the IP address and I can get my email via the web. I have also linked all the main pages on my old host to the corresponding pages at the new site IP number. I needed to do this to keep the data collected on click thrus and emails to clients in the one data base. So I have covered all the important issues. I just wasn't expecting it would take as long as it is to propagate, based on past experience.
12:00 am on Oct 20, 2003 (gmt 0)

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Ah, good... So you're not "locked out".

It's down to how long they promised, then. Last time I changed IPs, it was "up to 4 days." :( But it seems like it was mostly settled after 3.

Best,
Jim

4:39 am on Oct 21, 2003 (gmt 0)

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Well sometimes you should forget zen and follow your instincts. 72 hours later things were the same and I couldn't raise a reply to my email requests for support from my *new* registrar. A friend sent me a link to a web site DNSReport I didn't know of and sure enough the old name servers in fact had not been deleted so both sets of name servers were showing up. After a *phone call* to the registrar the old name servers were finally deleted from the record and within an hour the site is resolving the email is flowing and business can get back to normal. Whew!
Perhaps WebmasterWorld could add that web site to its list of tools-resources.
 

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