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Facebook Will Rank Faster Loading Pages In The Newsfeed

     
8:55 am on Aug 3, 2017 (gmt 0)

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The need for speed has arrived at Facebook as it now says it'll show faster loading pages in favor of sluggish loading pages.
It'll take into account an estimated load time of a page when clicked. It's odd, because you would have thought it could have been measured by it s systems, rather than an estimate. However, it'll take into account a person's connection in the estimate. With these estimates, faster loading pages will appear higher in the feed.

This update will roll out slowly over the the coming months.

During the coming months we’re making an update to News Feed to show people more stories that will load quickly on mobile and fewer stories that might take longer to load, so they can spend more time reading the stories they find relevant. Facebook Will Rank Faster Loading Pages In The Newsfeed [newsroom.fb.com]


Facebook best practices to improve mobile performance. [media.fb.com...]
10:19 am on Aug 3, 2017 (gmt 0)

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What? FB is by far the most bloated, slowest loading site I visit. In fact, in almost every instance, there are files (reported at the bottom of the browser) that never load.

So this is basically *pretending* they are keeping up with web standards and taking no accountability by passing the blame onto us.

I don't even know why this stuff upsets me any more. I guess what would really shock me is if one of the big powerful web giants actually did something altruistic.
10:59 am on Aug 3, 2017 (gmt 0)

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What is the definition of a fast and slow site? Any specific speed?
11:24 am on Aug 3, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Ha, the page for "Facebook's best practices to improve mobile performance" isn't mobile friendly.
11:39 am on Aug 3, 2017 (gmt 0)

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They don't specify the speed, but they talk about sites that take longer than three seconds to load will have 40% abandonment.
2:00 pm on Aug 3, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Not to take this off topic, but in case anyone missed it
What is the definition of a fast and slow site? Any specific speed?
Google set up a newer Page Speed testing tool in the wake of their Mobile First evolution, a few months ago. There are links and discussion in a couple of threads here:
[webmasterworld.com...]
[webmasterworld.com...]
9:26 pm on Aug 7, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Ha, the page for "Facebook's best practices to improve mobile performance" isn't mobile friendly.

Ha!

Anyways, I think it's a good move. I bet that's just a warning before their "instant stories are the best!" announcement.
8:58 am on Aug 14, 2017 (gmt 0)

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They don't specify the speed, but they talk about sites that take longer than three seconds to load will have 40% abandonment.

I'm curious, too, how they define "load".

According to Analytics, my homepage has an average load time of 6.64 seconds. But that's 2.13s on Firefox, 4.39s on Safari, 6.66s on IE, 7.33s on Chrome, and 13.0s on Android.

Then, according to Webpagetest.org, my "Start Render" is 1.957s, and my "Document Complete" is 5.773s. But then do the same test with Google Adsense turned off, and my "Document Complete" is 2.113s.

So are they really just punishing sites that use Adsense?