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Mailchimp DNS modifications

Need opinions on the implications, pros/cons

     
12:52 am on Apr 15, 2016 (gmt 0)

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Hi webmasters, a client has been running mailchimp campaigns for sending offers, etc. Now just asked me help to implement changes needed by mailchimp.

It's about modifying DNS records, creating a CNAME (DKIM: Create a CNAME) and creating a TXT record. This, on the webserver where his site is hosted (and email). I understand the aspects on authentication, this serves to make emails appear as sent by the server, not mailchimp. But I have concerns on the details (not provided). So, with such changes:

1. Does mailchimp will gain somehow, access to send mails from my server?
Doesn't sound good to me at all. Easy to flag the server or IP as mass sender or spam.

2. Would it just leave a footprint?
While the mails won't be sent from the server, such footprint will mean easy target to be flagged as mass sender.

3. I should not worry, it wouldn't affect my server, email or reputation at all.

Thanks in advance.

** Didn't know where to post this, so I searched and found threads on this branch (about mailchimp) so here it is mine.
9:36 am on Apr 15, 2016 (gmt 0)

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DKIM is a way for you to "vouch" for your email provider as a legitimate sender of emails @ your domain name and potentially increase deliverability rates. Fundamentally, it's about proving that someone didn't just send email @ your domain, pretending to be you.

Nothing is sent through your server, however if you send lots of spam, you will have confirmed to the world that you intended to send lots of spam. But this only affects emails sent by your email provider on your behalf.
1:12 pm on Apr 15, 2016 (gmt 0)

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Thank you Andy for your information, I understand it's just as supporting the email, kinda associating something with the domain, not sending from it. Sounds safe. I would thank any comment on implications as is "if it's something you would do". Thanks.
1:55 pm on Apr 15, 2016 (gmt 0)

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The idea is that you should see better deliverability (i.e. lower spam scores) with correct DKIM signatures. I don't know much "real world" impact this would have, but, there's nothing to stop you seeing if it works and turning it off it doesn't. I suspect if a big email provider wants you to use it, it probably has an impact.

I don't see any particular downside - you'll be sending the emails anyway, this just confirms that it was actually you sending them.
2:14 pm on Apr 15, 2016 (gmt 0)

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We just did this with Mailchimp and had a slight improvement in our open rate since (I assume) more of our emails were making it into people's inboxes instead of a spam folder.
10:58 pm on Apr 16, 2016 (gmt 0)

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Thank you Andy & getcooking. Will try and if something goes wrong then, caput.
 

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