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Wal-Mart Tells Managers To Match Amazon.com's Prices

     
5:15 pm on Nov 14, 2014 (gmt 0)

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Although, it seems, they've been doing this informally, it seems Amazon has taken enough business from the Wal-Mart for it to formalise the arrangement. This has got to be good for consumers, but tough on anyone trying to compete in that space.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc has informed managers of its roughly 5,000 stores across the United States that they can match prices with Amazon.com Inc and other online retailers, the head of the company's U.S. business said on Thursday.Wal-Mart Tells Managers To Match Amazon.com's Prices [reuters.com]
11:06 pm on Jan 2, 2015 (gmt 0)

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That shouldn't be too hard, because half of the stuff A lists now, is more than in stores. I don't want to say that it's some sort of conspiracy, but I'm starting to wonder... Many times over the last year, I'll find a common popular item on there in bulk, for a decent price. Not outrageous, but decent. Then you go back a month later to buy it again, and it's gone up %40, and now higher than just buying it in a store. I've seen this happen many times. It's almost like some sort of scam, where they're hoping that people just don't notice, on a repeat purchase.
8:07 am on Jan 17, 2015 (gmt 0)

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I was looking to buy a bunch of stuff on A the other day. Many items that I have gotten in the past, numerous times. I've grown suspicious of them lately, so now I check all the prices. I'd say about 2/3 of the stuff I wanted to buy, was more money than in regular stores. Nice stores. Significantly more. I don't get what they're doing.
8:38 am on Jan 17, 2015 (gmt 0)

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What I don't understand is Amazon's "List Price" which is clearly completely bogus, or perhaps I should just say a lie.
3:58 pm on Jan 17, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Funny thing about Wal-Mart is that the online price is sometimes cheaper. Cabelas' policy is that some of their own online prices are not valid in stores.

U.S. office supply store Staples has a similar policy. I never buy anything there without checking the round of competing online stores first, including Staples own online prices (which in one case was actually cheaper!). I feel better shopping at Staples because of their price matching policy. I think price matching is a good deal for everyone.
5:38 pm on Jan 17, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Over the last few days I did a bunch of shopping on Amazon to spend some gift card funds. They really do play a lot of games with prices. I got so many messages about price changes for items in my cart that it got crazy-making.

When comparing prices you have to keep an eye on the combined cost of the item plus shipping. Some of the third-party merchants on Amazon show a lower price for the product but show shipping separately. At first that looks more expensive, but if you're buying multiple items from the same seller it can end up being better value than Amazon's own prices. Amazon's "free shipping" isn't really free!

In my shopping late last night I figure I saved about thirty dollars by ordering the items I wanted from a third-party merchant without benefit of Prime shipping.
8:08 pm on Jan 17, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Then you go back a month later to buy it again, and it's gone up %40, and now higher than just buying it in a store.

Put everything in the "buy later" part of your cart. Every time you revisit the cart, there will be a message telling you the price has changed-- either up or down. When it hits a nice low number, buy it quick.
5:16 pm on Jan 26, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Lol good idea. Yesterday I bought a shredder on Amazon while standing in front of shredders at Walmart. For me, the reviews are even more important than small price differences, but price still matters. So, they should also put stars and qr codes linking to reviews on the shelves.
6:08 pm on Jan 26, 2015 (gmt 0)

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I agree, price isn't everything.

Many online retailers put user reviews up there against the product. A review often swings my opinion. I do read the through reviews that says "it's great" and that's the end of the review. Somebody that's taken the time to review it deserves reading.

It used to be the case that many bricks and mortar stores never matched online pricing. That appears to have changes over time. Many bigger B&M stores will happily sell the item to you and price match. They work on the basis that they made a sale. Of course, the small retailer stands little chance in this dog fight.