Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.145.166.247

Forum Moderators: buckworks

Message Too Old, No Replies

UPS Delivery Intercept SCAM

   
5:37 pm on Aug 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Order is placed using stolen credit using actual billing information so AVS = Y. The day of delivery, fraudster puts in a Delivery Intercept order to the final destination. Now, you must scrutinize every order even more closely!
6:04 pm on Aug 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Delivery Intercept "technically" can only be used by the shipper, not the reciever. If the address is changed in transit and you didn't authorize it, just file an insurance claim.
7:36 pm on Aug 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



"The day of delivery, fraudster puts in a Delivery Intercept order to the final destination.

Was the crook able to pull off the re-routing and get the merchandise? Or was it just an attempt?

I thought UPS pretty much stopped that old scam technique from the early 2000s. Was the shipment going within the U.S.? WE can re-route shipments but I think UPS has to see OUR phone number on their caller ID (or something like that).

10:07 pm on Aug 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



> Or was it just an attempt?

Yes. And the criminal would have gotten away with it if it wasn't for the cardholder calling about the charges.

Anyway, I got dinged with two Delivery Intercept charges. The first one is from the criminal. The second one is my phone call to have the package re-re-directed back to me (the shipper).

$10.00 - Intercept - Redirect Package
$10.00 - Intercept - Return to Shipper

I'm glad the loss was minimal as opposed to losing the merchandise as well! I'm not sure how one would reduce situations like this in the future.

1:32 pm on Aug 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



You can fight these charges:
$10.00 - Intercept - Redirect Package
$10.00 - Intercept - Return to Shipper

No one but the original shipper can request a delivery intercept. Therefore, the first intercept should never have occured...which means you should never have had to place a second (though you would have had to credit the card and call-tag the item). Just call UPS and let them know you did not authorize the first intercept and that it was attempted fraud.

4:48 pm on Aug 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



UPS and Fedex only deal with the shipper, as far as doing anything with the package when it is in route to destination.

Does anyone know what info you need (or how difficult it is to get it) to pretend you are the shipper and do the above?

5:25 pm on Aug 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



Does anyone know what info you need (or how difficult it is to get it) to pretend you are the shipper and do the above?

FedEx: Unknown to me.

UPS: Theoretically, only listed account members may request an interecept. In actuality...

UPS: Sample of regular changes to my account, made by me:
Can you say, "Yes." or "I am the shipper."? If you responded, "Yes." this query, you're now the shipper and have hijacked my account.
Some further interrogation has occured, on occassion:
"What company are you with?" The one your computer says owns this account. Oh, you need an account number? Can you read off the first 8 digits of the tracking number? You now know my account number.
"Contact phone number please, sir." My phone number? Wait, wait. You didn't update my number when I asked you to a month ago? What sort of service do you have over there? Change it, NOW!
You have now gained access to my account. May I suggest you create a call-tag to have packages shipped at my expense...make sure you charge me the extra $1.80 to have your package protected!

I have accessed and changed my account from so many different phone numbers, in so many different locations...without so much as giving a single bit of useful information. All I have done is respond, "Yes," or "That is correct," or "Yeah, I'm with XYZ. Please change/intercept/file a damage claim/change this part of my account." On the plus side, all I need to do to be reimbursed for damages and losses is respond the same way and I receive a check a week later. Maybe they have some voice recognition system beyond my comprehension. So far, I have seen no real verification method, but also I have never had any fraud problems so I have not worried.

12:29 am on Aug 19, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I had to fight a little for the refund on the first delivery intercept. UPS is not admitting they failed their "security check" and is giving me the refund as a "courtesy". Its probably the wise and legal thing to say.
1:41 pm on Aug 19, 2008 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



I've found that UPS "courtesy" is tantamount to "our actuary said its cheaper to pay you off than investigate." Then again, I sometimes think UPS things they are "allowing" me to have an account and the fact that they pick up and deliver any of my packages is a "courtesy."
2:37 pm on Aug 19, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



what's even worse is that we get fraud orders with MATCH / MATCH for all info and we ship via USPS (no option to redirect) but it's just scammers testing credit cards. Of course it works when there's no red flags! A $50 order shipping to an address that matches the billing address and your IP and phone number match the geographic region we are shipping to... this is a killer! About 1% of our orders are these and the chargebacks kill us ($20 fee each time plus the loss of product and shipping costs)!
9:37 pm on Aug 20, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



what's even worse is that we get fraud orders with MATCH / MATCH for all info and we ship via USPS (no option to redirect) but it's just scammers testing credit cards. Of course it works when there's no red flags! A $50 order shipping to an address that matches the billing address and your IP and phone number match the geographic region we are shipping to... this is a killer! About 1% of our orders are these and the chargebacks kill us ($20 fee each time plus the loss of product and shipping costs)!

Sounds like a great idea to take out the competition! Thanks.

On a serious note, the way you get around this is to check the IP address that the order came from. Then do a geo-ip lookup on it.

If the order is to the US and the IP is in Singapore, cancel the order. If you are worried that the customer might have just taken a trip/vacation, or is working aboard, or is stationed in the military, etc... You can always confirm with a phone call... Thought personally I would just cancel and forget about it. That excuse is about 1/100 of 1% valid.

11:56 pm on Aug 20, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Just to clarify, the talked about spammers' IPs are 95% always in a different country from the billing address, and the other 5% are usually many states away from the state of the billing address.
4:07 pm on Aug 21, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



GeoIP works to some extent, but there is a thing called VPN which allows IP addresses to originate from different locations. Using trace route becomes important because you have criminals using dedicated server as a web proxy or even dial-up modem connections. You really have to be diligent if losing the package content and payment is a big loss for your business.