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Paper Receipt on request requirements

On request, user must be given printed hard copy?

   
2:03 pm on Oct 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



If a purchasing party demands a paper bill, are there any US Federal, UCC or similar code to provide such?

In what grounds can such paper bill/receipt can be denied?

I vaguely recall that if a purchasing party agrees to electronic receipt, they can switch back to paper bills, and no contract may remove this right.

Any background experience, cases, or laws?

[edited by: Tapolyai at 2:03 pm (utc) on Oct. 29, 2007]

2:07 pm on Oct 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator brett_tabke is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



I don't know the laws governing this business process. A bill of sale (receipt) is always required in some form.

Are you sure you are not asking the wrong question? Why wouldn't you want to provide it and keep a customer satisfied?

2:11 pm on Oct 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



It is actually reverse.

I got a new Internet pipe in, but the vendor refuses to provide me a paper bill, unless I bundle an other service with it -at an extra cost.

This is problematic, as the IRS will not accept electronic expense records in an audit, as far as I know.

One can say, sure why not just print it off - but I have had the 'fortunate' experience of such receipts rejected by a local taxing authority. (It wasn't much so I didn't fight it.)

2:18 pm on Oct 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



In the UK a paper invoice *has* to be provided on request AFAIK, eg for VAT (sales tax), even in retail shops for small amounts.

A business must always be prepared to provide a proper receipt for services and work, though it might possibly be reasonable for them to charge you a small amount if they can show that issuing a paper receipt is non-standard and excluded by reasonable contract terms.

You can ask them if they really do all their business unreceipted what happens when the tax auditors come round? Cue sound of Italian accents and gunfire? B^>

Rgds

Damon

3:18 pm on Oct 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator brett_tabke is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



> This is problematic, as the IRS will
> not accept electronic expense records in an audit, as far as I know.

all you need is the credit card billing statement with the charge listed. Or you have the check. CC statement is an acceptable proof of purchase for the irs.