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One Person Business: Finding Time For A Vacation

     
2:09 pm on Sep 26, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



For those of you who run a 1/2 person operation, how do you go for a vacation?

If you can't find someone who can run the shop for you, do you just disable purchasing from your store informing your visitors that you are gone for 2 weeks?

2:04 pm on Oct 31, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



"Sorry but taking your work with you no matter where you go does not constitute a vacation in my eyes."

Fair point but we are all different.

3:55 pm on Oct 31, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



there is a difference between traveling while working and a true vacation. a true vacation is a time to unplug, relax, and unwind. if you haven't tried it in a while, you're missing out! if you have a hard time leaving your cell phone behind, go someplace phones and wifi don't work. :)
2:08 am on Nov 1, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



"Sorry but taking your work with you no matter where you go does not constitute a vacation in my eyes."

Fair point but we are all different.

Is generally known as a working holiday.

I still believe the best advice to the OP was given by Starec on the first page.

Starec's post P1.

AffiliateDreamer, I know exactly how it feels. I operated a 1 man shop some years ago.
Your problem is not vacation; your problem is 1 man operation... Any 1 man shop is quite risky (vacation can be planned in advance, accidents and illnesses can't).

Get a backup (at least one part-time employee) as soon as you are able to pay his salary. It will allow you to focus on growing your business, while he/she can take care of everyday operations.

Even if it seems you can't afford it right now, think again. Part-time, junior position don't cost much. Think of it as a kind of insurance policy...

invaluable...

4:22 am on Nov 1, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



i would bring my laptop and find a place with wireless.

put in about 2 hours of work each day.

5:13 am on Nov 1, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



We're a three person business and we're going to try taking a week off at Thanksgiving, by moving our ship dates out further. This will be the first time in 3 years and we are ready. Burnout is not an option so this is a self defense move.
7:27 am on Nov 1, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



The solution: Just do it.

It's not a vacation if you take the 'office' with you.

LEAVE THE COMPUTER AT HOME.

The hardest thing for a self-employed person to do (and learn) is that the world won't fall apart if you take a few days off.

Yes, you'll lose a few sales - so be it.

There's more to life than money...and you'll become even MORE successful (and make up for any sales you lost) when you come back recharged!

2:29 pm on Nov 1, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



I understand that a one person operation is tough, but surely it is mostly in America where we are over worked. Can some people from another country let me know how much vacation you can have? I feel like 8-12 hour days are not healthy, and we need to understand that the only good things in life don't come from hard work- sometimes they come from a balance.

Anyway- get rest- but stay focused!

2:47 pm on Nov 1, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Yes, you'll lose a few sales - so be it.

I think your missing the point, its not loosing sales but company reputation one man bands have an image to maintain to keep getting business and good reviews.

Thats my in put anyway, the idea of a part time help is really good.

3:03 pm on Nov 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



The hardest thing for a self-employed person to do (and learn) is that the world won't fall apart if you take a few days off.

Yes, you'll lose a few sales - so be it.

There's more to life than money...and you'll become even MORE successful (and make up for any sales you lost) when you come back recharged!

I agree 110%.

As a high-quality service provider, your customers should be grateful that you exist at all. You should not be shy about adopting the position that you provide them a service when you're there to do so, and when you're not there, then they will simply have to wait. The customers are not there for your benefit... you are there for theirs.

The idea that those who consume are somehow more important than those who provide is preposterous.

If some customers end up moaning endlessly and then going somewhere else, you probably didn't want them as customers anyway.

The chances are, however, if they appreciate your service, they won't.

5:04 pm on Nov 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



"The customers are not there for your benefit... you are there for theirs."

Wow, not in my world. My customers are here for my benefit. Without customers, I have no financial security. Hell, without customers I have no business ... period.

But I see the point, you do need to get refreshed to continue on.

Cheers.

3:15 pm on Nov 10, 2006 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



Hey guys... Why you are so strict here.

Customers are for us, we are for customers. Nonsense!

We work for each other. Customers need us, they need our work, but they want to get profit from our products. But we in our turn get benefit as well. If you consider your benefit too small so increase the price for your service.

The customer who wants to get profit from the service is ready to pay quite good money.

Best regards, Intempo.

6:55 pm on Nov 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I'm a little late to the party here, but...

My wife and I run our little business and manage to take at least 2 (and sometimes 3) vacations of 3 to 7 days each during the year.

It's pretty simple really - we put up a notice on the web site that we're going to be closed from X to Y and we'll ship orders when we get back. The answering machine has the same information and all emails get an auto-reply.

As an added incentive, I typically give all customers a 5% or 10% discount for orders placed while we're closed, with no minimum purchase.

We went to the Caribbean last March for 7 days and received nearly 200 orders while we were gone, which is far above our average of 200 to 300 orders per month. The extra business paid for our vacation about two times over.

The only hard part was digging out from under that deluge when we got home -- we needed another vacation by the time we got caught up!

I personally don't buy the bit about "advertising to the burglars" -- I'll take my chances on some enterprising burglar stumbling onto my niche web site, deducing that I'm not going to be home and that it's just a short drive from his house to mine...

This 42 message thread spans 2 pages: 42
 

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