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With GDPR, Do We Need to Continue to Pay For Domain Privacy

     
4:11 pm on Nov 14, 2018 (gmt 0)

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Now that GDPR has had its impact on redacting domain registrant details, do we really need to continue to pay for domain privacy?

I woudln't have thought so.

Also, when ICANN sends those WHOIS data confirmation e-mails, they are redundant, too, because GDPR means the details are redacted.
5:16 pm on Nov 14, 2018 (gmt 0)

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To the best of my understanding the answer is "No" . . unless your registrar refuses to comply with the GDPR.

Concealing once public WhoIs data is an interesting (read: money saving) side-effect of GDPR. Interestingly, my registrar provided a utility for an interested party to send an email inquiry to me . . without exposing my details.

The underlying assumption is that GDPR compliance (= privacy) will persist and not suddenly undone by court ruling (about WhoIs data), regulatory change, screw up somewhere, existing (old) databases suddenly being unleashed, etc.

<Wild Imagination>
Maybe someone will step up and offer WhoIs privacy "insurance" ~~ you don't pay for privacy but the service monitors for changes in rules or practices and, should there be a change -> WHAM! . . the "insurer" swoops in and covers the cost of re-privatization while you were sleeping. Of course, this somewhat ridiculous scenario assumes that the insurers bots will be faster than the WhoIs scraper bots . . .
</Wild Imagination>
4:35 am on Dec 2, 2018 (gmt 0)

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A question that's crossed my mind too, as I have some domains up for renewal.

Concealing once public WhoIs data is an interesting (read: money saving) side-effect of GDPR. Interestingly, my registrar provided a utility for an interested party to send an email inquiry to me . . without exposing my details.

In part, my private registration has been to serve as a spam filter and privacy wall for otherwise inevitable types of nuisance email. This utility, while it maintains certain kinds of insulation, still raises some questions.

- is the utility itself GDPR compiant?
- though it may keeps your location and phone details private, it might still expose you to email spam, depending on the setup and permissions... as well as the price and who pays to allow circumvention
- if it's cheap enough and any sender can legally use it, it might not reduce the expected volume of spam at all, as spam would continue to be economically feasible

So, to dig further... what's the background and business model on the utility?