Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.198.118.102

Forum Moderators: not2easy

Message Too Old, No Replies

European anti-piracy law introduced

Internet traffic down by a third as illegal file sharers take cover

     
3:48 pm on Apr 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Oct 22, 2003
posts:1260
votes: 0


Internet traffic in Sweden fell by 33% as the country's new anti-piracy law came into effect, reports suggest.

Sweden's new policy - the Local IPRED law - allows copyright holders to force internet service providers (ISP) to reveal details of users sharing files.

The new law, which is based on the European Union's Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement Directive (IPRED), allows copyright holders to obtain a court order forcing ISPs to provide the IP addresses identifying which computers have been sharing copyrighted material.

From the BBC [news.bbc.co.uk]

Syzygy

6:42 pm on Apr 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member wheel is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:Feb 11, 2003
posts:5072
votes: 12


lol. 1/3 of internet traffic is illegal downloads. In other news, 2/3 of internet traffic is people looking for nekkid pictures.

Reading the article though, this sounds like the wrong approach. Seems like they're giving private enterprise the ability to track and go after individuals who are file sharing illegally - without going to the police. The proper approach is of course to let the police deal with this. Unfortunately for copyright holders, the police have better things to do with their times than go file sharers. I'm all over copyright protection, but this kinda smells like goverment mandated vigilante justice.

And of course, Sweden's laws cover Sweden, not the rest of the universe, which covers a lot more territory. Heck, in some countries I think this copyright stuff is basically non-existent. I think there's even westernized countries where downloading certain (C) material is legal (Uploading isn't).

I wish they'd just throw some money at the police to go after the problem. A few knocks on the door from the cops "you know what your son is doing in the basement with your computer?" would probably do far more to shut this stuff down than some big corp. trying to chase some 14 year old.

8:03 pm on Apr 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Jan 30, 2001
posts:1739
votes: 0


>>I think there's even westernized countries where downloading certain (C) material is legal (Uploading isn't).

But in PTP networks, there isn't any such thing as uploading. It's all downhill.

8:12 pm on Apr 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Jan 30, 2001
posts:1739
votes: 0


>I wish they'd just throw some money at the police to go after the problem.

How should this be prioritized: above or below organized distribution of psychogenic material for profit? above or below random killing and maiming of people to induce terror in support of some naturally-psychopathic ideology? above or below malicious botnet-supported e-mail spamming, DDoS, identity theft, sabotage and fraud?

Above or below food and medicine for children?

Personally, I see public prosecutions of private torts right down with other expensive perks for bureaucrats, rich businessmen, and politicians: it's something society can't afford in a bad year, and ought not to support in a good one.

9:17 pm on Apr 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Mar 4, 2004
posts:877
votes: 0


Agree with Hutcheson, this is a civil matter and should not be considered a criminal matter.

<gets out crystalball and looks at article 4 weeks from now.....>

"...internet traffic in Sweden increases 33% as people and the software adapt to the law...."

2:47 am on Apr 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

Preferred Member

10+ Year Member

joined:May 12, 2004
posts:533
votes: 0


provide the IP addresses identifying which computers have been sharing copyrighted material. "

Well simply encrypting the transfer will mean that ISP's cant pass on the file-sharers details as they have no idea whether the person is sharing copyrighted material or legal material. If they then decrypt the data they will be breaking the law..

Seems a bit toothless to me and another waste of time and money.

5:29 am on Apr 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

Preferred Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Nov 20, 2005
posts:451
votes: 0


Ah the hand of Big Brother. I like EC Council Directive 2006/24/EC on data "retention" the most though! (Short version [en.wikipedia.org...] - check the part about how they can abuse your mobile phones - "funny", I had some dealings with the Commission for the Control of Interpol files very recently and suddenly my Spanish pay as you go mobile received a text in English stating I had to register my identity for that number within a certain time or it would be terminated!
6:18 am on Apr 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:July 29, 2007
posts:1757
votes: 86


If I so much as receive a letter from any company whom I did not authorize to have my information it can and will be settled in court. They are overstepping their rights.

In releasing copyright content all over the internet you are not protecting it adequately to begin with imo.

6:17 pm on Apr 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

Preferred Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Aug 11, 2004
posts:582
votes: 0


I bet the Telcos are crying now. So funny, the pain of one is the bread and butter of the other.
4:34 am on Apr 6, 2009 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Aug 29, 2006
posts:1312
votes: 0


But in PTP networks, there isn't any such thing as uploading. It's all downhill.

My understanding is that Torrent downloads require at least some simultaneous upload.

Even the old-style P2P applications that don't require uploads often have them on by default.

...

8:11 pm on Apr 6, 2009 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Jan 30, 2001
posts:1739
votes: 0


>My understanding is that Torrent downloads require at least some simultaneous upload.

I wouldn't call that an "upload". It's simply a "download to somewhere else." The difference is, it's some other party somewhere that is DOING the {whatever}Load. The person on the "uploading" computer doesn't know what files are being whateverloaded, and may not even know what files are AVAILABLE to be whateverloaded.

4:13 pm on Apr 11, 2009 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Jan 30, 2001
posts:1739
votes: 0


>The person on the "uploading" computer doesn't know what files are being whateverloaded, and may not even know what files are AVAILABLE to be whateverloaded.

This is particularly important when you're considering issues of "justice", as among the numerous violations of equitable principles perpetuated by the music industry goons in their pursuit of a perpetual income for themselves (at the expense of performers and public alike).

People are accused of "conspiracy", when they have had no contact of any kind, no meeting of the minds, no awareness of each other's existance, let alone each other's activity.

But the RIAA goons won't ever let "justice" get in the way of their claiming an inalienable right to an unconscionable percentage of the world's productivity--in exchange for no product of their own.