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Editor with FTP ability that supports TLS 1.1 or 1.2?

     
4:59 am on Apr 26, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Basically what the title says... need to find a web editor with FTP capabilities that supports the TLS 1.1 or 1.2 protocol for FTPS explicit connections. I am having an awful time finding one that supports this as they all seem to support 1.0 only. My 'go to' for many years was MS Expression Web believe it or not (don't laugh) because it was simple and provided everything I needed and it obviously does not support these being soo old. Dreamweaver CS6 does not support it either. I have tried a few I found on the web and those didn't. This is ridiculous... does anyone know of a decent software out there for editing with upload abilities that supports these protocols!?

I realize I can use an FTP software like WinSCP or similar, but I really want the convenience of just doing a right click and uploading or selecting multiple files and uploading right there as I work on files.

Anyone know of anything?
11:30 am on Apr 26, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Komodo Edit supports FTPS, and is supported. Not WYSIWIG though.

There are plenty of editors that support SFTP, but FTPS seems less popular. I do not think I have ever used it myself.
2:36 pm on Apr 28, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Thanks, but it isn't a matter of supporting SFTP or FTPS, but if they support the more secure protocols to connect. Strangely I had a really hard time finding any that support TLS 1.2 for FTPS or that allowed auth keys for SFTP for example.

BUT, I did find a workaround solution for anyone that might be interested. I came across a post on the web where someone else had the same issue and they used an SSH tunnel software. I won't mention the name because I'm guessing that would be against the forum rules, but a quick search should come up with it. You setup the tunnel software with your connection info for SFTP along with your keys, passphrase, etc. You then setup a listener on the localhost of your computer for regular FTP. Now, you can use older programs (like the ones I was using) which don't support these new protocols and just FTP to your localhost connection. The listener tunnels it through the secure connection then. Didn't take long to setup and requires two mouse clicks to connect then I can go ahead and upload as much as I want with my old software just as before.

I would much rather do this than manually upload my site pages with another FTP app and this is above and beyond saving me time not doing it that way.
10:55 am on Apr 30, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Komodo does support SSH keys for SFTP, and that should be cross-platform.

With the other editors I use keys just works out of the box on Linux, if set up for SSH (may not be helpful for you, but may be worth noting for others who read the thread).
11:08 am on Apr 30, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Just curious, is it that inconvenient to just use your favorite editor, then upload with a stand alone SFTP client like filezilla?
2:22 pm on Apr 30, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Just curious, is it that inconvenient to just use your favorite editor, then upload with a stand alone SFTP client like filezilla?


Yeah, it is. I'm not sure how you do things, but I tend to only upload the files I changed because I sometimes use the timestamps to remember last edits, make little edits here and there or sometimes big ones, upload as I go along, update only a jquery plugin here and there, and the list goes on. Only if there is a major change that practically affects every file will I upload the entire 'project'.

I wanted to throw my computer out the window using a separate FTP to upload... trying to remember which files I just edited, or having to maneuver through the tree to locate different files as I went along (not to mention two tree views), and so on. There is A LOT of additional time involved doing so.
2:27 pm on Apr 30, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Since my original post I came across another app which is new to me, atom, which fits the bill on a lot of things I was looking for and uses a package/plugin type of operation. The only downfall I see with it right now is the ftp addon I used needs some work - you can only have one connection profile per project and there are recursive issues when uploading folders. I won't be using it for these reasons, but I am keeping it around hoping some updates are made in the future. It is worth checking out.
6:29 pm on Apr 30, 2017 (gmt 0)

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I sometimes use the timestamps to remember last edits


Files have timestamps you can see in the standard FTP tree view. Prior to uploading I always save previous versions that are online. That way if an edit goes bad I can return to the previous version.

I'm pretty sure Filezilla supports TLS 1.1 and 1.2. I've done all kinds of things with Filezilla. Saved my behind many times.
https://wiki.filezilla-project.org/FTP_over_TLS [wiki.filezilla-project.org]
8:35 pm on Apr 30, 2017 (gmt 0)

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mihomes - most (S)FTP clients have a manager that allows you to save a particular place in your file hierarchy. It helps to configure that right away.

I keep SFTP, a text editor, another type editor and my web doc folder open all day long; just minimized at the bottom of the screen. Makes for quick edits.
9:38 pm on Apr 30, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Guys - I am very familiar with FTP clients and all the major players including FileZilla (for the past 18 years)... I am NOT going to use a second app to upload files while I am working with my design and/or coding :) It wastes all sorts of time for me. You can keep defending them with comments like the above about saving your place (which doesn't help me at all - I think all clients do that these days or can be set to) - it just doesn't work for me and I don't want to be wasting that additional time. Maybe my sites are a little more deep in terms of structure and size too than some of you. A separate software to do uploads just won't do it for me - it is not productive for my usage at all.

This entire topic got totally off track here I think because some of you don't understand what I was talking about originally... not all ftp or design software is going to support all the protocols/ciphers that are available these days. I will give FileZilla credit here because they are always on top of these things, but I am a WinSCP user myself when quick edits and file manipulation are all I need to do.

I am happy with the tunnel software I found which allows me to use my outdated design software and will giving Atom a try again when they get some of the 'bugs' straightened out.
6:23 am on May 5, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Yeah, it is. I'm not sure how you do things, but I tend to only upload the files I changed because I sometimes use the timestamps to remember last edits, make little edits here and there or sometimes big ones, upload as I go along, update only a jquery plugin here and there, and the list goes on. Only if there is a major change that practically affects every file will I upload the entire 'project'.


Use some sort of sync software. On Linux or Mac rsync is probably already installed (and is painless to install if it is). Unison may be better as it works on Windows as well, and does two way sync.

Then you can edit locally, preview/test locally, and then sync painlessly.
7:30 am on May 15, 2017 (gmt 0)

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I am no longer in programming but I used (for many years):
"UEStudio integrated development environment tour: FTP/SFTP/FTPS"
Just copy and paste the above sentence in a search.
not free but so reliable!
 

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