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Highest CTR you have ever had?

And how high is high?

     

thecleaner

6:12 pm on Jan 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



Being involved with affiliate marketing, Ive never really played around much with testing ads until I started marketing my own products.

Within the past few months Ive worked my way up from 7% CTR (which I thought was great) to a 12% CTR (which I never thought was even possible). I did this simply split testing different ads against each other.

I'm starting to wonder how high is high. What would be a good overall CTR to aim for?

This doesn't count individual keywords but overall CTR for a given campaign.

poster_boy

7:12 pm on Jan 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



What would be a good overall CTR to aim for?

CTRs depend on so many factors... including the following and so many more: the vertical, your average position, the strength of competition, how well your ad is written, how close your ad matches the query, the match type of the keyword, seasonality, the day of week/time of day, the particular syndication partners that drive traffic to this keyword, what country you're in, who you're targeting, and more.

This doesn't count individual keywords but overall CTR for a given campaign.

And, this adds other variables to the mix... how closely are the keywords related, if your ad use dynamic keyword insertion or not, etc.

It'll be far more useful for you to focus on improving your own CTR within your own group. An increase from 7% to 12% is fantastic (assuming your ROI is consistent and the increase isn't driven by a bid and, consequently, position increase). If so, I'd keep doing what you're doing without worrying about CTRs that others are getting...

Hissingsid

11:14 am on Jan 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Hi,

For some of my low volume terms I'm achieving over 20% and for the really big $ terms 10-12%.

My concern is exactly how CTR is measured. Since the same searcher probably returns to Google 3 to 5 times and I guess that each of those visits is an "impression" does this mean that you need everyone (100%) who searches for a term to click your ad to achieve 20%?

Cheers

Sid

ByronM

2:16 pm on Jan 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I have a few that have been 20% ctr.. amazingly still a poor QS attached to it :(

I even use google conversion tracking so they should be able to see the quality of the ad. Perhaps they know TOO much and want more of the revenue they see.

beginning to think this relationship with google is less of a free market symbiosis and more of a big brother, do as a i say not as i act type company.

poster_boy

4:08 pm on Jan 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I have a few that have been 20% ctr.. amazingly still a poor QS attached to it :(

This is precisely why loosely targeting CTR thresholds is of little value. For some keywords, 20% can be amazing... for others, it can be entirely insufficient. From your example, it's within the realm of reason to obtain a "poor" quality score with a 20% CTR if your competitors are generating higher CTRs in similar positions. If you were bidding on my brand name, for instance, even at 20% - you'd need to double that to be even remotely competitive.

inasisi

6:18 pm on Jan 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Remember, Highest CTR might not necessarily mean best converting. So always track your conversions for each version of your ad too.

laprescott

8:04 pm on Jan 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



I took a look at Efficient Frontier's clients' CTR in December 2007, and found the highest CTRs on AdWords were over 10% and the highest was 14%. Two of these campaigns were heavily focused on brand terms and had high positions. A few retailers had CTR over 5% in December.

I just posted an analysis of CTR by engine and channel here. Average CTR for Adwords is around 2%, and 0.07% for AdSense. [blog.efrontier.com...]

For AdSense, the highest CTR in December, at over 10%, was from a dating site.

Search CTR can vary quite significantly by position, and brand terms will most likely have the highest CTR.

PPC_Chris

8:44 pm on Jan 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



Just looking at a general CTR means nothing. I have had successful ad/keyword combinations that range from 25% (low volume brand term with no competition) to less than .50% (general terms where I was bidding at the bottom of page 1).

I would put almost no importance on overall campaign CTR and concentrate on keyword/ad combo specific CTR.

taking it one step further, CPA and conversion rate and much more important to running a succesful campaign in AdWords.

Hissingsid

9:04 pm on Jan 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



But...

If I have a 10% CTR am I missing 90% of the potential or, because of repeat searches am I getting maximum available because everyone searches 10 times?

It's an important question to help decision making. Unfortunately it is a question that Google seems particularly reluctant to answer. They have the information but choose to keep us in the dark. I wonder why?

Cheers

Sid

ByronM

1:31 pm on Jan 17, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



This is precisely why loosely targeting CTR thresholds is of little value. For some keywords, 20% can be amazing... for others, it can be entirely insufficient. From your example, it's within the realm of reason to obtain a "poor" quality score with a 20% CTR if your competitors are generating higher CTRs in similar positions. If you were bidding on my brand name, for instance, even at 20% - you'd need to double that to be even remotely competitive.

Mind you this 20% ctr is also a 20% conversion rate. Its a long tail keyword that does very well and gets very poor score.

The keyword is "Model Widget feature" type keyword that lands on an ecommerce page with full description, values, parametric search & filtering, reviews and links to the manufacture/warranty and service details.

I would also like to add this a new account and EVERYTHING is poor QS. I guess we now have to graduate to being competitive.

How long would a good CTR/Conversion rate go and by this logic i guess google would calculate your conversion into quality score so if you don't run google conversion tracking you would probably have a poor QS because of that? seems odd.

[edited by: ByronM at 1:33 pm (utc) on Jan. 17, 2008]

JBrown

4:41 pm on Jan 17, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



LeeAnn, thanks for posting that info. Good stuff.

Overall, I'd say you should take into account the keywords as well. If you are bidding on terms where people are likely to make a purchase, then they are much more likely to click on ads. Other keywords which don't have a purchase intent attached are likely to have a lower ad CTR.

Fresco

8:09 pm on Jan 17, 2008 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



I have a campaign running at the moment for one of our sites which has had a CTR of 46%

Over the last 30 days I have had 4,140 click throughs from 8983 Impressions and a average CPC of $0.03

Its the best campaign i have ever built- by far!

[edited by: Fresco at 8:12 pm (utc) on Jan. 17, 2008]