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adsense ads peddling women

     

swa66

4:37 am on Dec 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member swa66 is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



I just stumbled on a graphical ad on my site featuring
5 images of Asian women
with next to the picture a code (feels like a serial number), their age, weight, height and a city in China.
And a big red "more" button.

My site is about travel (inside the US).

I'm not sure what those women are offered for, but I utterly refuse to be any part in offering these kinds of ads via my site. This is guilt by association even if I don;t have a realistic means of filtering it out.

I've written a complaint to adsense support, but this might very well be the last straw for me, I'll decide in the morning if I'm going to pull adsense or not. I'm a bit too upset right now to make such decisions.

I don't care why it gets on, I don't care what I loose in income, I only want them to make 100% sure these advertisements and advertisers go away, permanently and proactively. If they can't, then adsense might well have to do without me, at least til they have for superior filtering and reporting in place.

It's not like the domainname of the advertiser doesn't provide a clue in it what it is about. It contains the strings "chn" and "love".

This might well be illegal where I live (and where the server is hosted), so not actign isn't an option anyway.

[edited by: incrediBILL at 2:30 am (utc) on Sep. 21, 2009]
[edit reason] clean up [/edit]

jeffgroovy

6:59 am on Dec 18, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



This has always been a problem, in fact I can't remember when this issues wasn't an issue. Google still allows either by ignorance, or by choice adult sites to use their advertising services on both search and on the content networks, and I'm not just talking about adult dating sites. But since Google ditched their "Don't be evil" slogan into the trash can about the same time their company went public, who's surprised about this? A large percentage of news stories covering Google in the last couple of years have further confirmed their abandoning of "Don't be evil" in favor of "Do whatever makes money", especially the last couple of months.

wolfadeus

9:37 am on Dec 18, 2008 (gmt 0)

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Interesting - Google refuses to post ads on my pages with articles on a small Austrian town called "F...ing" - but then it does post ads with dubious pictures on "innocent" sites.

The logics of algorithms :D

piatkow

10:29 am on Dec 18, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member piatkow is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



We had this discussion on "political" ads.

The content issue is a problem for ad funded sites targetted at young people and for sites for organisations such as churches or schools. A work around would be a single "adult" flag on any AdWords campaign and a "permit adult ads" flag on Adsense accounts. G would have to insist that any "dating" or "gambling" ad or anything for age restricted products must be so flagged and unilaterally set the flag in the case of complaint.

explorador

4:03 pm on Dec 18, 2008 (gmt 0)

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Hi, what about legal implications? (G). I mean, what you offer should be given. If G offers something, and gives you another thing, then it could be considered a lie or an infringement of their own offer?

Lets take a look at what Adsense offers to us:

AdSense for content automatically crawls the content of your pages and delivers text and image ads that are relevant to your audience and your site content.

Sorry but the BOLD quoted text is JUST NOT HAPPENING. I'm getting ads having nothing to do with my content, the example that upsets me the most is abortive pills... on a travel website (with not a single word related to anything that could justify the ad.

Then again, what about the Google offer and what we are actually getting? I guess the "relevant to your audience" is something they decide. But this is going out of hand.

Jane_Doe

4:33 pm on Dec 18, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jane_doe is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



I get a lot of those where Google picks up on words that can also refer to something unrelated to widgeting.

The multiple meanings are a real problem. I used a term similar to a "catered affair" on a page about weddings and got divorce lawyer ads, because of the multiple meanings of the word "affair".

netmeg

4:35 pm on Dec 18, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member netmeg is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



Then again, what about the Google offer and what we are actually getting? I guess the "relevant to your audience" is something they decide. But this is going out of hand.

That's probably covered in the TOS for signing up - been so long I'd have to look.

But grelmar has it right - the product is what it is. It's not perfect by a long shot (and I have ads I would like to block from my sites, and I have situations where ads are not appropriate for one site but fine for another site so I have to block them altogether to keep them off the first site) But I recognize that I'm giving up complete control in exchange for ease of use. And over the next year, in the places where I need more control, I'll probably move to other forms of monetization (where I haven't already)

AdSense is a great 'set it and forget it' solution. But that's *all* it is, and probably all it will ever be.

Wouldn't a simple solution be for Adwords users be required to categorise their ads and then, on the same basis Adsense publishers be able to opt out of the same list of categories.

This has already been proven not to work unless strictly policed (the referral ads) When I wanted to place referral ads from, say, the Automotive category, I got all kinds of ads from everywhere else, because some advertisers ran their offerings in every single category, regardless of relevancy.

There are probably just as many people trying to game the system on the AdWords side as there are on the AdSense side. In some cases, both.

signor_john

5:09 pm on Dec 18, 2008 (gmt 0)



There are probably just as many people trying to game the system on the AdWords side as there are on the AdSense side. In some cases, both.

Let's not forget, too, that implementation of countermeasures by Google will always lag behind new ways to game the system. When you're playing Whack-a-Mole, you can't keep the moles out of the picture until you've had time to see them and whack them.

Disclaimer: I'm not defending ads for peddling or paddling women. If AdSense were my ad network, I'd wipe out entire categories of ads, such as dating services, debt consolidation, weight-loss remedies, herbal cures, vanity presses, SEO schemes, and how-to-make-money-with-AdSense e-books. But it isn't my ad network, so I don't get to run the show.

mixart

5:50 pm on Dec 18, 2008 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



I've been pushing for the feature to block by keyword or industry for some time now. Dating ads are the worst offenders for me - I have some chat topics on some pages (mostly chat for teens) and I see borderline adult dating ads all the time. It's almost impossible to keep up with blocking them (and don't get me started on how useless the ad review system is).

panic

5:58 pm on Dec 18, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



5 images of oriental women

"Oriental" refers to an object, "Asian" refers to ethnicity. That's almost as offensive as the ad itself.

signor_john

6:50 pm on Dec 18, 2008 (gmt 0)



"Oriental" refers to an object, "Asian" refers to ethnicity. That's almost as offensive as the ad itself.

Whether it's offensive depends on the speaker and the listener, I think--and maybe on the listener's age and origins. My middle-aged, second- or third-generation Korean-American sister-in-law uses the term "Oriental," and I've heard third- and fourth-generation Chinese-Americans use the word, too.

Mind you, I don't think of them would want to be peddled or paddled by Google advertisers and readers.

nippi

11:54 pm on Dec 18, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



the ads are offensive

this is about men in richer countries paying for a bride. men who cant get women in the own country, because they are likely older, ugly or socially challenged.

this is not dating

farmboy

1:10 am on Dec 19, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member farmboy is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



the ads are offensive

As someone previously said, they might be offensive and unwanted to some yet welcomed and profitable for others.

this is about men in richer countries paying for a bride. men who cant get women in the own country, because they are likely older, ugly or socially challenged.

I know a couple of guys who have went on those Russian tours and they are anything but as you described.

I've seen ads on my sites that I thought were a waste of space but turned out to do well. That doesn't mean I want unwanted ads, just that when we try to transfer our own tastes to others, sometimes we're very wrong.

FarmBoy

rocco

5:34 am on Dec 19, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Reading this thread shows people have totally different opinions about what is offensive... so how can an algo determine whether I or one of my daily 100'000 visitors finds some ads offensive?

If my site audience is so picky, I'd probably had to broker my ads myself. That is what the poster is suggesting correctly.

I find some posts here quite offensive, btw. disregarding the individual situation of people.

2clean

8:41 am on Dec 19, 2008 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



Actually Rocco it's pretty straightforward. All people are asking for is some degree of customization of what ads are served on their site. This could be done via some form of preference list in the control panel. However as this would mean, on the part of Google, providing a detailed list of all the "offensive" categories and to some extent as you mention, problems with classification of that list, it might be more tricky then not.

Again we're at an ethical juncture, which seems coming up often in online at the moment.

swa66

10:09 am on Dec 19, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member swa66 is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



5 images of oriental women

"Oriental" refers to an object, "Asian" refers to ethnicity. That's almost as offensive as the ad itself.

Signor_john got it right: I learned English at the age of 15, some nuances are lost on me. Sorry if I offended anybody, was totally unintended.

seoArt

2:13 pm on Dec 19, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I have a support forum for people going through marriage and relationship problems. I've been offended quite a few times, seeing ads that encourage "extramarital affairs" and adult oriented dating sites. I always filter them out once I see them. I even set up a section on the forums for people to report inappropriate ads.

It would be nice if Google set up a pre-approval adsense feature where you could set your account to only show ads you approve.

annej

6:07 pm on Dec 19, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member annej is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



I could give them just these few key words, widget, widgets, widgeting and widgeter. If they only served ads that include those key words my targeting would be so much better.

It's not just that a key word is found on the publisher's page that makes it a relevant ad. It makes a big difference why the visitor is there. If we could set a few words like this we could get ads our visitors are interested in. Also we wouldn't have to be embarrassed with inappropriate ads.

markis00

9:43 pm on Dec 19, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Hey,

I can understand where the poster of this thread is concerned. And everything people are saying about being able to set what kind of ads appear on your site would be great. I find it ironic that Adult related sites cannot join Adsense, however, Adwords will still allow those ads.

Ironic, isn't it? Google will collect advertising revenue from ill sites but not allow the ill sites to post ads. So if Google is making money who cares what's included right?

This really dosen't fit the motto G started out with, trying to be an ethical company that is not a monopoly....

but when you think about it G is totally a monopoly...if you stop using Adsense what do you switch to? Yahoo....we are not allowed to use Yahoo ads up here in Canada. I have been told as well by other webmasters Yahoo pays no where near the same amount...and Overture is no longer an option. I use Chikita but in conjunction with Adsense; as its intended to be a non replacement ad.

Furthermore if you could set what ads you wanted (specifically) there would be the problem of being paid less as you may be using advertisers that don't pay the top dollar.

Here's what I recommend...setup Adsense like Adwords. Let publishers pick the ads showing up first AND let us see the CPC value at that time. I am so sick of pulling my hair out trying to figure out which ads give the higher CPC. I know it changes but G can easily intergrate a function before posting ads that you get to see some sample ads and how much the CPC is for that day. Google knows that anyways....who don't they tell us? Stop all this mystery CPC market that we have on going. When you use finite amounts and percentages you stabilize your own market and avoid inflation, especially if your advertising partners can know that CPC value right off the bat. After all, if you're testing an industry, you likely go on Adwords first and see what the CPC is looking like anyways right? Why not put this option right into ASA. right now its just a workaround or back door. Make it the norm.

so it's back to Adsense again....the ball is in G's court here they need to step up their game. What worked with content filtering years ago when Adsense began no longer works. New innovation is required.

but that's what G is good at, right?

signor_john

10:35 pm on Dec 19, 2008 (gmt 0)



but when you think about it G is totally a monopoly...if you stop using Adsense what do you switch to?

I earn more from display ads and affiliate links than I do from AdSense. Google a monopoly? I don't think so.

If AdSense is the only way you can monetize your pages, you need to rethink your business model. Keeping all your eggs in one basket can result in an unexpected omelet.

markis00

11:00 pm on Dec 19, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Well thats nice for you john...maybe you could share with me who else you use for Advertising? :) I am making some money through affiliate links too (amazon) but no where near my advertising revenue.

Sylver

5:14 am on Dec 20, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Technical solution:

Actually, there is a way to control what is displayed on your website:

Using JavaScript, you can capture and parse the ads you receive. If they don't check out, set display to none to hide the ads.

This is a pain in the ***, but it could serve as a substitute until Google solves the problem.

mcneely

8:12 pm on Dec 21, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



I don't think that Google is going to change anything, or write new with regard to this.

We all know that the net is a big place, and more often than not, we'll find insidious advertising regardless.

Money talks and B.S. walks in this industry, and Google knows it. It's nothing personal really ... it's just business. If you ever wondered where Google stands on this issue, just take a look at the ads over on the myspace.

I feel that it's up to each owner to decide what might or might not be good for themselves or their clients, and if looking at ads for sites that might malign or otherwise degrade foreign women in some fashion or the other isn't something that you want? Well then pull the ads and look for an alternative.

Bad things on the net never really ever go away, they just get filtered. All of the rubbish that existed in 1999, still exists in 2008.

It's up to us to deal with ads such as these in our own ways and in our own time. Looking to Google to eliminate part of what makes them probably the most money these days is a bit of a stretch I think.

signor_john

8:18 pm on Dec 21, 2008 (gmt 0)



Looking to Google to eliminate part of what makes them probably the most money these days is a bit of a stretch I think.

I'd guess that such ads appear mostly on pages where Google and publishrs aren't making much money, since the ads don't be contextual (to judge from the original post in this thread, which mentioned photos of "Oriental women" on a U.S. travel site.) It's more likely that these are lowball CPM filler ads, like the "fight belly fat" ads that some publishers have complained about.

Jane_Doe

8:42 pm on Dec 21, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jane_doe is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



It's more likely that these are lowball CPM filler ads, like the "fight belly fat" ads that some publishers have complained about.

Not sure about the Asian women ads, but the flat belly ads were showing on sites with otherwise decent earnings per CPM.

signor_john

10:20 pm on Dec 21, 2008 (gmt 0)



Not sure about the Asian women ads, but the flat belly ads were showing on sites with otherwise decent earnings per CPM.

Google's stats show only average EPC, CTR, and eCPM. At a given moment, the network might serve a low-paying CPC or CPM ad even though most ads are more targeted and better-paying.

I see this kind of behavior with my non-AdSense display ads every day: the typical ratio of CPMs from high to low might be 3:1, and on any given day there might be some remnant ads (which pay little) or house ads (which pay nothing) along with ads that pay CPMs in the double digits.

swa66

11:05 am on Dec 22, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member swa66 is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



I do not think it were placement ads (I get *very* few, and nearly no in that url channel), so it almost had to be contextual ads unless I was the only one to see it (which in itself would have been odd).

There isn't all that much text on that particular page (think of it more as a menu to what's below). But there is plenty to keep the theme of the site for other ads shown. It's a page that does earn easily in the top 5 of the site (partly due to it being a top 3 landing page for incoming links. It's not a page I promote specifically. It are pure spontaneously grown incoming links.
This is a part of the site that's really old, aside of style updates its content is mostly untouched in the last decade.

JerryOdom

1:48 pm on Dec 22, 2008 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Sex Sells

potentialgeek

1:59 pm on Dec 22, 2008 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



Google has never given us a content filter as publishers. EVER! Thousands of publishers no doubt have asked for one since 2003, yet... nothing. Five years and just a competitive ad filter (which is very limited and usually already full). We don't even get an explanation why we can't filter fraud/objectionable content. And then a boilerplate non-response if you complain to Google.

We don't even get an official Content Filter Beta test to see if it would kill earnings. That would be just too innovative an idea for Google. So they can't say, "We tested it, but it didn't work"; or, "We don't know how to write the code to make it work." Nor can they say, "We're so committed to free speech, we won't let you filter ads." (They block content to China.)

There isn't even a statement of justification, such as, "There will be no Content Filter because it is impossible for it to avoid killing earnings." Or: "Every publisher would misuse it and ruin the Content Network."

They say there are rules on what an advertiser can put in ads, but admit they can't review every single ad before it is published; yet they won't let publishers enforce their own standards (by blocking ads which violate their own TOS).

But maybe in 2028, they'll get to it. (They just started testing fonts in '08, lol!)

p/g

vladid

3:24 pm on Dec 22, 2008 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



The lack of control over what advertisers were showing in my AS channels eventually pushed me away from them (for good, perhaps). My filter was hitting 500 domains (I had my list extended by our AS contact) and it was getting mighty tedious sifting through the unwanted junk.

signor_john

4:43 pm on Dec 22, 2008 (gmt 0)



I pulled AdSense from one of my two sites also, because the ads reflected poorly on me and on the site's content. AdSense works fine on the other site, though, with very few ads that I'd consider to be remotely offensive.

As for a "content filter," I don't see why Google would want to offer that unless significant numbers of publishers were leaving the network because of ads for matchmaking, weight loss, or whatever the offensive topic du jour might be. You or I might like the ability to ban whole categories of ads or certain keywords ("weight loss," "fat," "debt consolidation," "Russian brides," "poetry contest," "authors wanted"), but if the ads are legal and most publishers aren't complaining, why would Google want to mess with a winning formula?

Let's be realistic: AdSense is Google's network, not ours, and requests for changes that aren't in Google's own interests are going to rank low on the AdSense team's "to do" list.

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