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December 2007: Google Adsense income way down

Why is my Adsense down by 80%?

     
11:46 am on Dec 22, 2007 (gmt 0)

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I have a website and my income has reduced from around 50 USD per day (June '07) right down to less that 10 USD per day.

I would appreciate any help anyone can provide as I am at a loss as to what to do. The site is 4 years old and Adsense has served me well to date.

Look forward to any comments or suggestions.

[edited by: jatar_k at 12:27 pm (utc) on Dec. 22, 2007]
[edit reason] no urls thanks [/edit]

7:00 pm on Dec 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

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It seems to me the advertisers are migrating to Pay Per Action (Referrals) in droves. Doesn't this mean the funds for Pay Per Click will be equally diminished. Becoming successful in PPA or affiliate advertising takes a long time. Unless your successful in PPA your Adsense earnings have to decline a lot!

I'm sure many advertisers had never delved into PPA advertising before Google offered it. As they move there (probably a large migration in the months before the holidays), the Pay per Click dollars are disappearing.

I for one am trying not to support Google's Pay Per Action (Referrals) move, its guaranteed to blow away Pay Per Click income. They sure made it inconvenient at first as well!

There are literally thousands of affiliate PPA programs out there. There are very few successful Pay Per click options. Why should an advertiser pay for something he can get for free! Ads displayed, for months on end, without a penny being paid, thats what referrals have introduced. And perhaps there's not even an intent to have a conversion, the advertiser is really just doing "branding" for free! (I advertise with Adwords also and can see all the tricks I could play now!)

It's too easy for Advertisers to actually rely on the Publisher to make the sale, but the publisher has no control of the advertisers landing pages etc. A publisher always makes some income on a click, but until they become successful at PPA (referrals) they make nothing! Zero dollars! It will be interesting to see Google's financial results, I'm betting profits for Adsense will be down due to the ongoing transition to PPA.

Pay Per click justly rewards a publisher for his part of the job, walking the customer (hopefully smiling) into the Advertiser place of business.
Pay per action forces the publisher to attempt to make a conversion when he has no control. The landing pages and domain have to be desirable, etc.

The correct system would be simply a hybrid of the two, giving the publisher at least the smart pricing income for a click on a Pay per Action ad! But now you're getting nothing for clicks on PPA ads so your income declines.

Google why not break out of the box and actually create something new, instead of copying what's been done already by thousands!

Sure some will do well with Google's Referrals but really you have to luck into a referral advertiser that fits your niche (then you may make a lot of money). Google doesn't have enough choices in referrals, but each new choice they add eats away at Pay per Click income.

For me to succeed in PPA or affiliate programs I've had to sign up with dozens, if not hundreds,of affiliate programs to find the products and domains that match a niche exactly and therefore can make some money. By the correct "domain", an example would be Amazon, where many, many, people have accounts and it's easy for a customer to complete a transaction and therefore a conversion (regardless of the topic or product). Amazon has a legitmate PPA program that is likely to frequently convert.

Google's PPA program may never do as well as say Amazon but in the interim the Advertising budgets are all just sitting there, while the Publisher's mostly provide free Advertising and even discounted Pay Per Click advertising.

7:42 pm on Dec 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Bumpski, advertisers who hope for free branding have Google's "Ad Rank" algorithm to contend with. See:

[adwords.google.com...]

It shouldn't be surprising that Google takes ad performance and landing-page quality into account when determining Ad Rank; after all, Google doesn't profit from "free branding" any more than we do.

8:30 pm on Dec 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Yes, your right EFV, and that's why I predict, at least transitionally, Google's income will decline as a result of PPA (referrals).

And Adwords is incredibly difficult to keep up with! (One reason the transition to PPA has been slow).

Some of the analysis in this thread has indicated Adsense earnings are almost random. Perhaps this is what we can expect from a system that's so complex that most the time it's in a completely unstable, and perhaps chaotic, state. Therefore there will be large random variations in earnings, variations spanning random periods of time as well. Thus unending posts that are completely accurate, (My income is 80% down for 3 months now!). There's actually nothing the poster can do other than grow, grow, grow, pages, and hope the random number generator swings up!

If you have enough sites and income you may reach a state where you think you can predict your earnings, but ultimately small changes (also as mentioned in this thread) may have huge, unpredictable, impacts on earnings.

10:00 pm on Dec 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

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I've seen enough discussion, and observed my own data, to offer this simple observation:

If so many diverse Adsense users have seen such similar declines occurring at the same time, then something else happened that is independent of their topics, their practices, and their volumes. Plain and simple, something happened that is not random, gradual or seasonal. Anyone who is rationalizing these anomolies as anything other than a distinct change in the environment of Adsense is blowing smoke up our *noses*.

11:16 pm on Dec 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

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If so many diverse Adsense users have seen such similar declines occurring at the same time...

Hmmm. How many?
How diverse?
What percentage of adsense using webmasters?

You don't know, really, do you. I sure don't. I have no idea what is causing drops for some people. But I also don't know how many people have been so affected, or how many people have seen the opposite happen (rev. increases).

It's all smoke, bub. But it's cheap entertainment, both reading and writing about it, but apart from that time can be used to make more money by doing other things besides speculation.

11:45 pm on Dec 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Anyone who is rationalizing these anomolies as anything other than a distinct change in the environment of Adsense is blowing smoke up our *noses*.

As always, some publishers are hurting badly, some are hurting a little, some are chugging along at their usual levels, and some are happily counting their blessings.

11:06 am on Dec 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Yes but has even Google learned the lesson of how difficult it is to succeed in Pay Per Action campaigns?

(I'm convinced sporadic earning decreases must occur due to the referral program migration, some will see the decreases sooner, some will see them LATER. Either way your PPC income will decline.)

If Google's income suffers, we'll all suffer some! Until Google "breaks out of the box" and changes the publisher compensation structure, it's very likely all our incomes will decline as advertisers slowly migrate to PPA ads.

Google should step up and pay a weighted smart priced minimum payment for each click on an ad, regardless if it is PPC or PPA! (This could help advertisers too, because it could moderate the amount they have to pay for the action)

If Google did this, many many affiliate program participants might migrate to Adsense making us all rich! Why? Because the advertisers will ultimately chase the publishers. The publishers have a product, the advertisers just have cash. Which truly has more value?

11:47 am on Dec 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

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My earnings have been dropping since Nov 2006, there down about 80% and reaching new lows every month, earnings this Dec are about the level when I first started out, heading towards 0?

12:31 pm on Dec 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

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grigoroo, I can't help but agree that it's widespread enough to suggest that there's a universal factor involved.

Whether it's an influx of PPA advertisers as opposed to the number of PPC advertisers as far as ratio is concerned I wouldn't have a clue about, but if it's got anything at all to do with it, I'm sorry to say that I do know that the Google PPA doesn't have ANY of the factors going for it that are critical to the success of PPA marketing from a publisher's (or affiliate's) viewpoint.

Affiliate marketing is a completely different model than PPC, and is to a good deal reliant on there being tools and capabilities for the PPA marketer (affiliate) to help along with pre-sell for increasing conversions. None of those tools or capabilities are available, nor is there the element of "relationship" between marketer and merchant that's intrinsic to the affiliate marketing business.

Anyone who's been involved at all with affiliate marketing for any length of time (or who has any brains) does not give away free branding. And it's been a long time since banner or text adverts in sidebars or "separate sections," even if they're inline (as MFA sites have them) were effective for producing conversions for ecom sites.

FACT: There are certain verticals that can take 70-80 return days for a sale to result. What good is 30 days, except for merchants getting free customer acquisition at no cost to them, because those sales take place beyond the return day duration? And what capability is there for a publisher (affiliate) who knows those verticals to request longer return days? NONE = sales for merchants, zero revenue for aff/publisher and zero for Google as well.

Once you take the possibility of communication and relationship out of the PPA model, it's a lose-lose proposition for PPA marketers.

And please, don't anyone with big content sites with a following and return userbase and authority status even try to argue with that. You don't promote underwear. You don't promote socks or t-shirts. You don't promote towels. You don't expendible consumer goods. You don't promote furniture or car parts. But people onlne BUY all that stuff, and any affiliate who gives away his or her right to negotiate with a merchant for better terms,longer return days or higher commission percentages if they can produce has got to be out of their minds.

5:46 pm on Dec 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

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it's very likely all our incomes will decline as advertisers slowly migrate to PPA ads

i don't see that. and i'm absolutely with the ppa critics.
there is no marketplace on adwords. publishers know what they're worth and won't give away advertising for free as long as it isn't absolutely necessary. and they rather spend their time creating useful content than taking on the effort and risk of ppa ads.

we're talking about income variations here, right? any chance that ppa would bring any more stability? certainly not. advertisers love secure income, so do publishers. but for the publisher, ppa means more instability, more insecurity in income, more like a lottery. and because of these inconvenient conditions, publishers won't migrate to a ppa platform to a serious amount. therefore: no marketplace. one of the business partners is missing.

there is a reason why the ppc platform is always google's core product. because it's equally distributing risk and effort to the business partners.

and to add more fuel to the fire: i never really understood the sense of smart pricing, do you? ;)
i always thought that likelihood to convert is already expressed through the preselection of people who actually respond to an ad by clicking on it. low ctr is a sign. a click is a prospect. no need to discount it.

by now i think it was the worst thing to do to mash up a stable pay per click platform with untransparent conversion (ppa) measurements. affiliate is different business. smartpricing is only a freebie for advertisers and another regulating screw for unexplained income variations.

6:15 pm on Dec 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

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moTi

Have you seen the payouts on the referrals (PPA)?

Many publishers will be very tempted due to lack of experience with PPA. A few will make excellent money resulting in postings saying how great PPA is, actually the postings will be from a very small minority, but that's all it will take to move inexperienced publishers to the PPA domain. How many publishers or advertisers actually read WebMasterworld?

You can make money with even Googles PPA, if you luck into the perfect match for your niche, but it may take months of experimentation.
The key is there are already thousands of advertisers listed in the Referrals area of Adsense. Where did they come from? To me this means money being held up, and not available for PPC. Meanwhile advertisers are pretty much getting free clicks.

7:28 pm on Dec 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

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This thread is getting awfully confused, with so many things being discussed. Are we talking about earnings being down, eCPM being down, CTR being down, and/or EPC being down?

For what it's worth, I've seen a modest decline in CTR over the last month or so, but EPC has been growing steadily. December month-to-date earnings per click are running 27% ahead of the same period last year. Even with a 16% decline in clickthrough rate compared to December 1-29 last year, eCPM is up about 13.5%. I have no idea how many AdSense ads on my site this month are CPA, but if the number is significant--which I very much doubt--then the ads would appear to be a blessing and not a burden. (Your mileage may vary, depending on your topic, type of content, and audience.)

7:37 pm on Dec 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

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I have no idea how many AdSense ads on my site this month are CPA

What? Aren't CPA ads part of the "Referral" program? Why wouldn't a publisher know if they had placed Referral units/ads on theie own site, and wouldn't the numbers show up in the Referrals stats section?

I must be missing something here.

[fixed there/their typo]

[edited by: ken_b at 8:17 pm (utc) on Dec. 29, 2007]

8:00 pm on Dec 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Ken, I can't comment on that. I can say that, if there's any mass migration from CPC to CPA, I haven't seen any evidence of it. I suspect that--as usual--forum members are getting worked up over a perceived (as opposed to a real) threat.
11:44 pm on Dec 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

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The thread's theme is earnings are (way) down; Why?

Many posters mention a large decline (in Earnings) in the last 3 or 4 months as compared to 3 to 4 years of Adsense experience.

One hypothesis is advertiser migration to CPA.

The evidence of CPA advertiser growth can be found at:
"Adsense Setup"
"Referrals"
Scroll Down to "Browse Items"

You will find more than 2000 Advertisers from which you can create code snippets to add to your site. You won't have any CPA (or PPA) ads unless you add code to your site specifically for CPA.

If the migration hypothesis is correct, some publishers earnings may be impacted sooner than others, simply by virtue of which advertisers are migrating which marketing efforts to CPA.

A topic as diverse as travel may take a significant time to be impacted by this CPA migration, whereas topics with fewer advertisers may be impacted significantly already.

I've found most of the posts in this thread on topic and significant.

BUT there are 2000 ++ Advertisers participating in the CPA/PPA/Referrals program. They had to come from somewhere. They can't all be new Advertisers. The money for these CPA ads has to come from somewhere.

Dinner time!

12:23 am on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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The money for those PPA programs comes from the sales themselves. That's what PPA is. It doesn't require a "budget" in the conventional sense.

Anyway, I'm with EFV. I haven't seen any sign whatsoever that Google's PPA program is affecting advertisers's budgets, nor do publishers seem to be taking it up in any numbers.

12:33 am on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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BUT there are 2000 ++ Advertisers participating in the CPA/PPA/Referrals program. They had to come from somewhere. They can't all be new Advertisers. The money for these CPA ads has to come from somewhere.

Jomax explained this just as I was going to respond.

It's not a one or the other approach from the advertiser's point of view (of which we are one).

Let's say we advertise ppc and we are receiving a good return on that investment profit wise. Then google comes out with ppa which carries NO financial risk at all. We only pay when we sell (and make a profit).

We decide to try it, since it's no risk. Even if we don't make a lot of sales PPA, if it doesn't require huge time investment, we'll keep trying it. And we'll keep our already profitable ppc ads.

Consider also that a number of companies use various kinds of ads. You will often see large advertisers who have a ppa/affiliate program, and also advertise ppc in google, PLUS in cpm in networks.

And, re: ppa for leads or other non-sale actions, we're seeing a lot of experimentation, with programs coming and going, commissions being altered, etc.

1:52 am on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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If an advertiser doesn't apportion a budget for his CPA (PPA) ads he must be assuming up front that the ads will fail! There is a risk, the risk of CPA is success! You do have to pay someone if they produce a sale so money must be budgeted for a CPA campaign's success.

If I had $10,000 dedicated to CPC (PPC) campaigns and I commit to a CPA campaign I must allocate some of the $10000 UP FRONT to pay someone when they make a sale. If I don't I may find at the end of the month that I have to come up with $20,000, because both my CPA and CPC campaigns were a success!

If an advertiser has a fixed budget he must reduce his apportionment to his CPC campaign to fund his CPA campaign. I can't believe many can double their budget. Again, you sure can't rely on you CPA campaign failing, that means you're wasting your time!

If, as a publisher, you are only participating in CPC and not investigating CPA you can expect income declines with Google's current system. If you're in a niche perhaps you will experience an 80% decline (in earnings) in far less time than someone who has an extremely diverse set of sites and topics.

Google's CPA program has gone from just a few advertisers to well over 2000 in just a few months, this is quite a trend, that's very easy to monitor. (Well it's getting harder because most the categories in Referrals have "> 100" entries.)

And again there certainly are sites that have such a diverse advertiser base that it will take a long time to notice this transition, perhaps some never will, the loss will just be masked by hard work and increasing traffic.

Perhaps someone can explain how successful CPA campaigns will not affect CPC income in the long term, assuming a publisher does not become successful at CPA.

2:13 am on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Perhaps someone can explain how successful CPA campaigns will not affect CPC income in the long term, assuming a publisher does not become successful at CPA.

I see your points. However if advertisers in my niche are as you suggest, moving across to CPA then logically I would see them in the list of advertisers.

So would other publishers for their niche's.

It hasn't happened in mine and the offerings so far have been pathetic. Using any number of site keywords throws up a lot of irrelevant advertisments. At least the CPC model does stay on topic.

I can readily think of a number CPA advertisers I'd love to see appear among the offerings. I'd grab them with both hands.

3:15 am on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Google's CPA program has gone from just a few advertisers to well over 2000 in just a few months, this is quite a trend

Out of how many advertisers total? Scores of thousands? Hundreds of thousands? Two thousand advertisers is likely to be a drop in the bucket, compared to the size of the total advertiser pool (which is spending upwards of a billion dollars on AdSense ads every quarter).

And again there certainly are sites that have such a diverse advertiser base that it will take a long time to notice this transition, perhaps some never will, the loss will just be masked by hard work and increasing traffic.

Although one publisher's experience isn't proof of anything, a 27% increase in earnings per click (compared to the same month last year) doesn't suggest a mass exodus from CPC.

Perhaps someone can explain how successful CPA campaigns will not affect CPC income in the long term, assuming a publisher does not become successful at CPA.

It may affect income for some publishers, just as other factors such as smart pricing, placement reports, and site-exclusion filters can affect income for some publishers. In the final analysis, advertisers pay for perceived value, and publishers who can deliver quality traffic will do well whether pricing is CPM, CPC, CPA, or a combination of all three.

5:28 am on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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If an advertiser doesn't apportion a budget for his CPA (PPA) ads he must be assuming up front that the ads will fail! There is a risk, the risk of CPA is success! You do have to pay someone if they produce a sale so money must be budgeted for a CPA campaign's success.
If I had $10,000 dedicated to CPC (PPC) campaigns and I commit to a CPA campaign I must allocate some of the $10000 UP FRONT to pay someone when they make a sale. If I don't I may find at the end of the month that I have to come up with $20,000, because both my CPA and CPC campaigns were a success!

Lawdy, lawdy, you made me laugh!

You might want to consider revenues, eh?

It's kind of important when business is discussed.

PPC. I could spend 10k and earn nothing.

PPA. If I spend 10K I'm guaranteed to generate way more than 10k in revenue (depending on commission rate, other things). Unless I'm a complete idiot. LIke if I don't understand what revenue is versus what costs are!

...something like that.

6:25 am on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Yesterday I got a PPA conversion for $0.01 , I am basically providing free advertising to advertisers and paid nothing for even the conversions.
6:41 am on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Yesterday I got a PPA conversion for $0.01 , I am basically providing free advertising to advertisers and paid nothing for even the conversions

This particular advertiser, what was quoted to you originally or what were you led to believe?

Now I only use Google's own products for CPA simply because I can't find anything else nearly relevant but they haven't performed that poorly.

10:51 am on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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Yesterday I got a PPA conversion for $0.01

I've tried, and still trying now, but only in a very limited fashion, google PPA ads, and the fact that we still get ads from other advertisers that were not in the original selection goes to show you how messed up it is. I got $0.02 from one that was never selected, yet showed up, even when I specifically chose not to let it display others. Do you really think I would use ad space for an advertiser that pays $0.02 for a conversion? That's a serious waste of virtual estate for most, if not all, publishers. To me that screams "not ready for prime time". It's getting there, but it still has many months, or even a year, to go before it is a mature platform compared to other companies. So I just experiment a bit every now and then, but nothing serious, and I think that's how most publishers still feel.

As for the other poster who seems to obsess over advertisers jumping over PPA ads in order to explain the big drop in the past months for some publishers, I've read the same things from a few other posters here some time ago and they seem to have an agenda to make people believe that all the action is going to the other side, which is not true. Why they do so, I don't know, but I imagine they have their angles. Just browse the list of advertisers yourself and you'll see how the few hundreds that are present (many of them really pathetic offerings) do not even remotely compare to the hundreds of thousands of PPC advertisers, where many are big fortune 500 companies, and I don't see any in the PPA side.

I don't know why this whole PPA topic came in this thread, but I personally think that it is a misguided explanation. I think the "glitch" theory (smart pricing gone wild) or the economical theory (advertisers suffering from low sales) have a lot more to offer than the PPA one.

11:31 am on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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koan,

they seem to have an agenda to make people believe that all the action is going to the other side, which is not true. Why they do so, I don't know, but I imagine they have their angles.

Exactly my thoughts.

On most boards, Google's PPA is being bashed by most publishers, almost always for the same reasons (too little payout per conversion, shady tactics for getting free impressions, and unwanted ads show up). I had a look at PPA myself, and no, this is not something I will touch for at least another half year.

Whether or not PPA takes up speed only Google knows. However, I agree that there must be hundreds of thousands PPC advertisers compared to only a few thousands of PPA advertisers. I do not think that this is creating the kind of income reductions some (!) of us are experiencing.

Rather it's other reasons, e.g. the general economic situation, advertisers being smarter, or Google being more greedy. I think it's no big secret that I believe the latter.

2:27 pm on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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the ppa cheerleaders randomly hijack various threads to recite their agenda. for sure, everybody loves a guaranteed income. a ppa platform ensures this for the advertisers (which i suppose all of them are). but we don't need this kind of sleazy egoism, we need a system that benefits both business partners. apart from ripping off the other side short-term, in the long run advertisers only make money if publishers make money. that means both parties must be able to agree to the terms of trade.

the sole number of advertisers is irrelevant to a functioning platform. it's the appeal to both business partners what counts. again: only a market place where marketing risks are distributed equally among the participants can attract advertisers and publishers in sufficient masses to get the thing going. google has a platform where this is happening. the payout system is neither cpm nor cpa. it's the accounting method right in between which guarantees the needed balance: cpc. i think we can agree at least for the common text ads, nothing better has been invented yet.

3:25 pm on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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the ppa cheerleaders randomly hijack various threads to recite their agenda.

Actually, this thread was hijacked by the PPA panic-mongers. :-) I think most of us (including the few who may be "PPA cheerleaders") would just as soon get back to the topic at hand.

As Koan and Zett have suggested, it's highly unlikely that PPA is the reason why some publishers have experienced big drops in AdSense income this month. PPA is just an esoteric side dish; the main meal in the AdSense mess mall is CPC.

Getting back to the topic of "Google AdSense income way down," I think it's important to mention again that we need to clarify whether we're talking about total earnings, eCPM, EPC, and/or CTR. Different metrics have different significance and are subject to different influences.

8:51 pm on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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I have a website and my income has reduced from around 50 USD per day (June '07) right down to less that 10 USD per day.

I don't understand the repeated confusion. I believe we can equate income with earnings. So the topic seems to be, earnings are down, for a statistically significant period and amount. Why?

And the original post actually discusses a period from June 07 in the context to Dec 07 in the title, a period of approximately half a year! This is based upon a history of performance of:

The site is 4 years old and Adsense has served me well to date.

4 years of Adsense experience. About as much as anyone can claim in round years.

Since few are proposing actual hypothesis, yet another reason for a glitch can be proposed.

When Google changed the clickable area of a text ad, for some reason, they did it differently for the Search network versus the content network.
Have you noticed that in a Google search results page ONLY the Title of the Adsense CPC ad is clickable, but in the content network, both the ad Title, and URL, are clickable. Perhaps for a month or two, or three, when a visitor clicked on the ad URL, the click was not credited to the publisher! Has anyone tested this possibility? Actually as a result of the originator's legitimate concern, a test of this hypothesis was performed.

Some sites have had no impact, perhaps they enhanced the Title differently leading most visitors to always click on the Title anyway, so, NO impact on earnings. But perhaps others have enhanced the URL, and for their sites a significant earnings loss occurred. Google does well, but throughout the history of Adsense they have had numerous design errors, many blatant.

It behooves observant webmasters to detect and correct Adsense design problems as soon as they occur.

So the originator initiated an appropriate open ended question. But it seems the question wants to be changed to "Why's my income down this month?". A much maligned topic, and not the topic of the originator's thread. But if the thread can be hijacked in this way, then it easy to say "Oh, the originator is just having a normal adsense earnings anomaly, we're done here".

Give an originator with 4 years experience some credit, and assume they've looked into many of the traditional sources of earnings loss, and now, they are trying to the take the next step. Could it be an Adsense bug, a new feature in Adsense they've overlooked to date, something a little more exotic than, over analyzing CTR, eCPM, etc?

Other notes:
CPA or PPA (The keyword is Action) is used for leads and other non-income producing endeavors, so it certainly is not always self compensating.

Hmmm Hijacked eh?
Happy New Year (In advance)

9:15 pm on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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WebmasterWorld Senior Member jomaxx is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

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Since the OP (a) provided woefully inadequate details and (b) characterized their earnings as being "down 400%" and (c) has made only one real post EVER and (d) has never returned to respond to any questions raised, I'm not inclined to grant this person a lot of credit for smarts.

Maybe their traffic is way down for unknown reasons. Maybe they're doing arbitrage and Google is making that harder. Maybe they're running a forum of some kind and users have tuned out the ads and stopped clicking. There is no way to know or even speculate.

9:32 pm on Dec 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

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posts:1205
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Since when does a certain amount of experience confer expert status? I know many people that do the same thing incorrectly over and over again. I'm not claiming the OP did or does but claiming four year's AdSense experience doesn't necessarily add anything to the argument.
This 163 message thread spans 6 pages: 163
 

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