Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 3.80.6.254

Forum Moderators: Robert Charlton & goodroi

Message Too Old, No Replies

Ranking ramifications similar content within same site

     
6:14 am on Oct 3, 2016 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Apr 3, 2002
posts:2586
votes: 3


I've been monitoring my rankings on key phrases for the past year or so. Since Penguin 4, more specifically - since the announcement that P3 demotions would be removed, I've noticed drastic improvements on > 70% of my phrases. Most interesting is that one page on my site has not only improved in ranking over the past few days, but it also ranked very well (page 2) since Penguin 1. Coincidentally, this page is the only page on my site that discusses a particular topic, and it's the only page on the site with the critical key word in the title.

By comparison, three other pages that have drastically improved in ranking (from ranking above position 150 to ranking #30 to #70). When I sorted the key phrases that improved, I noticed that the key phrases are very similar across three different pages of my site (all of which contain at least one identical key word in their titles).

That may sound confusing, so to rephrase:
Page 1 title: how to get green examples fast
page 2 title: green examples are easier to get than red examples
page 3 title: get green examples here

Keyphrases that improved drastically, but seemed to reach their highest possible ranking:

green examples fast --> Page 1 --> jumped from 150 to 47
get green examples --> Page 3 --> jumped from 180 to 70
fast green examples cost --> Page 2 --> jumped from 160 to 55

Page 4 (not listed above) is about "red examples" and has ranked around #12 for the past 2 years and now on page 1

Could there be too much similarity, and therefore thematic confusion for the algorithms, to rank those phrases higher? Should they be consolidated into one page? I have read in the past that similar pages may impact Googlebot's identification of themes and topics within a theme, and may have difficulty "knowing" which page to rank. I doubted that notion until today.

I really hope this makes sense. I know it's convoluted, but hopefully you guys will have some tips based on your expertise and experience :)

Thanks!
9:30 pm on Oct 3, 2016 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member aristotle is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Aug 4, 2008
posts:3671
votes: 374


crobb305 -- I haven't seen you here in a while.

Anyway, I think that one of the things that google objects to is having separate articles for minor variations of a search term. But I thought that was targeted by Panda, not Penguin.
6:51 am on Oct 4, 2016 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:Apr 3, 2002
posts: 2586
votes: 3



Anyway, I think that one of the things that google objects to is having separate articles for minor variations of a search term. But I thought that was targeted by Panda, not Penguin.


In my view, Google aims to improve variations of search term and content experience.


Good points. I am trying to decide which course of action I should take. In the near-term, I am going to wait for Penguin to semi-stabilize (to whatever extent that may be now that it runs in real-time) before I make any significant changes. Perhaps in a few months I will try to combine those pages that appear to be in competition with each other. I agree that Panda was responsible for handling similar/competing content, but I have always felt that Penguin was such a severe demotion that the effects of Panda were difficult to detect (at least for sites that were as hard-hit as mine).

Now that my site is recovering from Penguin (per the daily keyword reports I receive), the impacts of Panda are more obvious. Just my working theory since I have little else to go on. I just find it interesting that the three pages that mention/discuss "green examples" appear to be in competition with each other, with each ranking reasonably well for very similar long-tail phrases but not higher than position 35. At the same time, the one page that discusses "red examples" is not only on page 1 for important phrases, but seemed to survive through the entire Penguin ordeal. This tells me that the problem for my site lies with the word "green".

Anyway, thank you for the feedback. I guess there is some truth to the notion that similar pages that discuss the same/similar concepts will find themselves competing on very similar phrases; if Google is unable to identify "the best", then there may be an upper limit to their ranking potential.