Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.172.221.7

Forum Moderators: buckworks & webwork

Message Too Old, No Replies

Whois is dead as Europe hands DNS overlord harsh warning

     
10:50 am on Apr 15, 2018 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member tangor is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Nov 29, 2005
posts:8869
votes: 728


The Whois public database of domain name registration details is dead.

In a letter [PDF] sent this week to DNS overseer ICANN, Europe's data protection authorities have effectively killed off the current service, noting that it breaks the law and so will be illegal come 25 May, when GDPR comes into force.

The letter also has harsh words for ICANN's proposed interim solution, criticizing its vagueness and noting it needs to include explicit wording about what can be done with registrant data, as well as introduce auditing and compliance functions to make sure the data isn't being abused.

ICANN now has a little over a month to come up with a replacement to the decades-old service that covers millions of domain names and lists the personal contact details of domain registrants, including their name, email and telephone number.


[theregister.co.uk...]

The times, they are a-changing.
11:02 am on Apr 15, 2018 (gmt 0)

Preferred Member

Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Mar 25, 2018
posts:500
votes: 101


Good.
11:18 am on Apr 19, 2018 (gmt 0)

Preferred Member

Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Mar 25, 2018
posts:500
votes: 101


Additional article :

"DNS is about to get into a world of trouble with GDPR"
[zdnet.com...]
5:55 pm on Apr 19, 2018 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member lucy24 is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Apr 9, 2011
posts:15374
votes: 725


In the long term, what will this do to websites that currently use DNS lookups as one aspect of access controls?
11:27 am on Apr 22, 2018 (gmt 0)

Preferred Member

Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Mar 25, 2018
posts:500
votes: 101


In the long term, what will this do to websites that currently use DNS lookups as one aspect of access controls?

What kind of information are you fetching?
2:56 pm on Apr 22, 2018 (gmt 0)

Full Member

5+ Year Member

joined:Aug 16, 2010
posts:252
votes: 20


I dont think it has something to do with DNS, it is the WHOIS data that contains personal data
4:32 pm on Apr 23, 2018 (gmt 0)

Moderator from US 

WebmasterWorld Administrator martinibuster is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Apr 13, 2002
posts:14860
votes: 476


European overreach.
8:26 pm on Apr 23, 2018 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member lucy24 is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Apr 9, 2011
posts:15374
votes: 725


What kind of information are you fetching?
I don't personally take this approach, but would you still be able to look up 11.22.33.44 on the fly and verify that it is allocated to {authorized robot}?

:: irritably wondering just whose privacy is being violated when you look up a domain name and find it belongs to Another Happy Registrarname Customer ::
2:38 pm on Apr 24, 2018 (gmt 0)

New User

Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:May 8, 2017
posts:10
votes: 1


Yes, it is aimed at personal data protection against data abuse.
2:23 am on Apr 27, 2018 (gmt 0)

New User

joined:Apr 27, 2018
posts: 1
votes: 0


Some domain sales companies, such as Escrow.com, rely on public Whois to confirm the buyer's receipt of the name. Wonder what they would do if not that, when buyers forget or ignore the request to acknowledge receipt? Also, a lot of us who do domain sales need Whois for research and contacts, generally.
3:23 am on Apr 27, 2018 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from US 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member keyplyr is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Sept 26, 2001
posts:12913
votes: 891


@lucy24 - so far they aren't touching lookups for IP range assignment which don't divulge personal information.

However, that may be on some future chopping block.