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Two different registrars claiming ownership of the same domain name?

How is this possible? P.S. never use "rebel" as a domain registrar.

     
11:26 pm on Aug 7, 2017 (gmt 0)

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So a client of mine was using rebel.ca as a registrar when I signed on with them...

When I noticed that, I immediately transferred all of their "important" domains over to Namecheap for a number of reasons...

They were being overcharged by rebel.ca, they were being charged for ridiculous things like "ownership protection", but most importantly... every change I wanted to make seemed to be manually done on their end.

Like if I wanted to change the nameservers, it seemed as though there was some kind of manual check in place, because it took a few hours before they would even begin to propagate.

Anyways... so I transferred an "important" domain away to namecheap...

The company associated with that domain was sold off to another owner, they took ownership of the namecheap account, etc.

To my surprise, the previous owner forwards me a "act quickly! your domains are about to expire!" message from rebel... for the domain that I transferred away from them months ago.

What the?

All whois information shows the domain to be in the ownership of enom (aka namecheap), which makes sense, because that's what I did 6 months ago was to transfer it there.

How on earth then could rebel.ca think that they still own the domain?

Unless the handling of their registrar status is 100% manual and they forgot to delete the record of my client owning that domain with them when I processed the transfer?

They force you to wait 5 days after initiating the transfer from another registrar, at which point icann performs the transfer, for example... to give you an idea of just how small and rinky dink this company is.

My biggest question is however... how was rebel about to produce a "domain authorization code" for a domain that is not actually in their possession?

That is a little unsettling...

I've left the "auto renew" setting on the original domain owner's account... I want to see if they manage to change him a renewal fee for a domain he does not even own any longer. Ha.
11:57 pm on Aug 7, 2017 (gmt 0)

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WebmasterWorld Senior Member keyplyr is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

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How on earth then could rebel.ca think that they still own the domain?
They don't. They send out those notifications from a different data source which still had the old code.

Most registrars aren't too quick to update this info. I get them from GoDaddy even though I moved the domain to another registrar a year ago. I bet they get a lot of people blindly renewing back with them.
12:03 am on Aug 8, 2017 (gmt 0)

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>They don't.

But they do!

I just logged into my original client's rebel.ca account, and I can see the domain right there plain as day... claims it's expiring August 16th 2017 (when namecheap has it locked in until August 16th 2018)... and still allows me to attempt to edit the nameservers, renew the domain, etc...

All of the other domains that I transferred away from his rebel account are no longer visible in his rebel control panel/domain dashboard... but this one is.

I'm not crazy or inexperienced.

I don't post much on here anymore, but I have been registering and transferring domain names around 1 per week for the past 10+ years now and have seen it all... or so I thought.

This however, I have never seen.

I am positive that rebel thinks they are still in control of the domain when they are not.

And I assumed that domain transfer authorization codes were unique for every transfer request? (because they're only valid for 40 days after creation)

So how could rebel generate one that they do no longer control?

[edited by: rollinj at 12:10 am (utc) on Aug 8, 2017]

12:06 am on Aug 8, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Well you said it yourself... they do things manually it seems. Maybe you should contact them and clear this up.

I'll make note of rebel.ca to stay away from.
2:03 am on Aug 8, 2017 (gmt 0)

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the thing that really matters is which Registrar record is returned from a whois request.
this is the information held by the registry operators. (e.g. ICANN for .com, .org, etc)

the fact of the previous registrar showing stale data shouldn't matter since nobody should be looking for it there.
2:35 am on Aug 8, 2017 (gmt 0)

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It's showing as enom on the icann whois.

I am still really curious how rebel was able to create a domain authorization transfer code for the domain though.

I wonder... if I tried to initiate the transfer away from namecheap.. and used to code provided by rebel... would it work?

Unfortunately it's a high profile domain so I can't try it.
 

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