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Wal-mart paid USD $9 million for the Shoes.com domain name

Wal-mart pays big bucks for elite domain name

     
3:47 pm on Apr 9, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Wal-mart paid USD $9 million for the Shoes.com domain name in a bankruptcy auction, see the blog post at the link below (which also contains links to copies of the supporting bankruptcy court documents):

[domaininvesting.com...]

The transaction also included a few other relatively worthless domain names, TMs, and social media accounts (all listed in the court documents), so clearly the elite Shoes.com domain name was the asset Wal-mart was buying.

Those who assert that exact match domain names are "dead" should reassess their thinking.
5:57 pm on Apr 9, 2017 (gmt 0)

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In other news, there are at least 500 full-time, professional blacksmiths in the US.
8:33 pm on Apr 9, 2017 (gmt 0)

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it might be hard at extremely large scale.

Amazon has diapers.com and soap.com

[cnet.com...]
3:33 pm on Apr 10, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Nice to see you GeorgeK. Thanks for the news/input.

Wal-mart is scrambling for some strategy to fend off Amazon's growing ability to eat into Wal-mart's margins. Let's hope they're better able to execute on their vision than so many of the players that emerged in 1999-2000. Clearly their existing infrastructure (warehousing, distribution, supplier relationships, etc) lends gravity and an inference of reality to their move. It may well be that the margins on shoes argues for the decision + "buy online / return to store if unhappy" may give them an advantage over other players in the space.

I could be wrong but I thought Amazon recently announced plans to shift gears on deploying Diapers.com and Soap.com. Maybe it was other domains. If I'm correct then that reversal on Diapers.com/Soap.com MAY be tactical, that is, a choice to NOT "prove" the value of a commercial keyword strategy.

At what point do manufacturers begin using the same strategies as Amazon / Walmart and just go direct to consumer? In that scenario Soap.com or Diapers.com might be the better play. At some point manufacturers may see a way to cut off or cut out Amazon / Walmart as a way of preserving margins. Amazon has been proving the model.

[edited by: Webwork at 3:39 pm (utc) on Apr 10, 2017]

3:38 pm on Apr 10, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Webwork: Yes, Diapers.com/Soap.com were a part of Quidsi, started by Marc Lore, and were bought by Amazon. Amazon shuttered those recently.

However, Marc Lore left Amazon, started Jet.com, and Jet.com was bought by Wal-mart. Jet.com bought ShoeBuy.com in December for $70 million, and now Wal-mart bought Shoes.com which is being operated by Shoebuy.
3:44 pm on Apr 10, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Thanks for the clarification via the additional info, GK.

I'd love to know how they crunched the numbers / eval'd the model. Lands End / Sears played with "buy online / return to (Sears) store". I'm guessing there is considerable savings on returns, especially with Shoes. I haven't dug into their model but I'm guessing this is how ShoeBuy/Shoes will work. It's all about the margins . . and happy (price sensitive) customers.