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.keyword vs. keyword.com

Discussion about new gTLD domains

     
4:19 pm on Nov 4, 2015 (gmt 0)

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I'm curious to hear webmaster's thoughts on the "new" gTLD's.

I've always been an advocate for strongly built keyword.com or geokeyword.com domains. I've seen more EMD's fail, but I've seen plenty that do just fine.

Wikipedia says -
The official list of all top-level domains is maintained by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA).IANA also oversees the approval process for new proposed top-level domains. As of November 2015, the root domain contains 1096 top-level domains,[2] while a few have been retired and are no longer functional.


600-700 or more of these were assigned last two years.

List via wikipedia:
[en.wikipedia.org...]

Will Apple start using Ipod.Apple instead of Apple.com/ipod ? Will other brands follow suit?

Will consumers find enough credibility in this to embrace it? Does this help sort the brands from the cesspool?

One problem I see is that only one brand will own the generic term, and most .keyword gTLD's and they likely already have a .com. Of these 1000 gTLD's, how many will have more than a handful of pages, or a large corporate site?

So the biggest questions are...
Do you think .Keyword will replace keyword.com eventually? If so, when, why, and what will that transition look like?

*edited to add wikipedia list link

[1][edited by: stuntdubl at 4:55 pm (utc) on Nov 4, 2015]

4:26 pm on Nov 4, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Brand TLDs like (Apple, BMW etc) are different to ordinary new gTLDs. The mistake that a lot of people make is in taking them as being the same thing.

Regards...jmcc
4:52 pm on Nov 4, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Hey jmccormac -

I agree, and understand on the technical side there are differences, but from a consumer perspective it is a shift away from the traditional .com Webmasters will always be on the cutting edge with regards to implementation, but the larger question is how will consumers react to the new structures, and what the preference will be.

Even with generic non-brand .keyword gTLD there will likely only be a couple hundred to a thousand top domains. I can see geomodifier.keyword and topCPC.keyword getting registered - but will they actually get built out and redirected from a past successful .com domain?

How many .club / .marketing / .travel domains will actually get registered and have a website placed on them? Is it enough to shift the consumer confidence after giant flops like .info and .biz ?
5:05 pm on Nov 4, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Anytime you get a domain that does not have a .com your looking for trouble. People have .com etched on their brain. Most people will always put a .com on anything you tell them. Even with a .net or .org you will lose traffic to people typing in the .com instead unless your going after a very tech audience. For some reason their are exceptions like del.icio.us. Not sure how they ever got any type in traffic but they did.
5:17 pm on Nov 4, 2015 (gmt 0)

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The brand versus generic argument is one I run across frequently, Stuntdubl,
I run web usage surveys on TLDs and see how people use TLDs for websites. The .COM is fast becoming a legacy TLD in many country level markets where the main growth has shifted to the ccTLDs. Recognition of the new gTLDs is still very low and most people don't really know much about the new gTLDs. However there are some new gTLDs that are beginning to get usage.

There are some geographical new gTLDs like .NYC, .BERLIN, .LONDON, .VEGAS and they are developing like ccTLDs in that they are being slowly accepted. The usage percentages are not quite up to ccTLD or even gTLD levels yet. If anything, they are the ones that will supplant the geo + keyword .com domains as ccTLDs follow very different dynamics to .COM in that business names and localities become far more important in a ccTLD than generics.

As for .CLUB, I ran a full new gTLD web usage survey in October and the usage for .CLUB was a follows:
Number of domains in survey: 270,233
Usage | Percentage
| Active/unclassified | 12.7486 |
| Brand protection | 0.2420 |
| Clone sites | 0.2650 |
| Inpage redirects | 0.2731 |
| External TLD redirect | 3.4233 |
| Forbidden/not found | 4.4425 |
| Holding page | 12.2961 |
| Internal site redirect | 4.5424 |
| Matched external TLD redirect | 0.8959 |
| PPC parking | 28.1524 |
| Redirect | 0.6750 |
| For Sale | 2.5456 |
| Unavailable | 1.2060 |
| Compromised/hacked | 0.0104 |
| Redirect to other .CLUB site | 1.2911 |
| No Response/Site | 26.99 |

The data is still being processed but it is a relatively good view of web usage in that gTLD.

Regards...jmcc
6:33 pm on Nov 4, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Great insights jmcc -

So is my assumption that 12.7% of the 270k are active/ registered.
28% have domain parking?
Is that correct?
Surprisingly higher than I thought it would be.

How many of these do you think are legit websites though?
.club was the first to over 100k registered, and a few well dev'd sites.

Seems .club is one of the faster growing, more developed domains thus far. There are at least a handful of sites that are somewhat legitimate listed -
[finance.yahoo.com...]

It still feels a bit like a psuedo gold rush where registrars are making money selling shovels to domainers.

It seems like a lot of the new gTLD generic domains are turning to spam already though.
[webmasterworld.com ]

So I guess some will make it, and some will turn into spammed out wastelands?
7:12 pm on Nov 4, 2015 (gmt 0)

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12.7% active/unclassified. But there are also other categories that can be included as possibly active (In page redirects, internal site redirects.). The PPC parking is a combination of registrars parking undeveloped domains on PPC and domains being parked on PPC for revenue. Some TLDs have higher PPC. That 12.7% will fall as some other algorithms are run over the data. There's a more refined duplicate content algo that will provide separate categories for duplicate content.

There are actively developed websites in .CLUB but like all TLDs, the ones that the registries promote are typically the best of the bunch. However the .CLUB does seem to have escaped the Truckstop TLD effect where more sites in a TLD will redirect to the registrant's primary site in another TLD.

Freebie TLDs always encourage spam and a few of them do have issues. But that thread was quoting numerology. The .ZIP gTLD hadn't even launched and these bozos were claiming it was the number one offender. Looks like they couldn't tell a TLD from a file. The high registration fee of some of the new gTLDs has made many of them less attractive to spammers looking for a disposable e-mail address. However there is also a questionable content category that arises with free TLDs where counterfeit goods/dodgy drugs websites appear on free TLD sites and are promoted via link injection hacking and spamming.

Regards...jmcc
7:31 pm on Nov 4, 2015 (gmt 0)

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For accepting the nTLDs it is all about developing popular websites. So last week i performed some research on the Alexa 1 million Top websites and counted the number of nTLDs domains. This is the top10.

xyz|1137
club|490
top|321
link|251
website|198
today|146
jobs|135
coop|110
guru|98
news|96

So there are 1137 .XYZ domains in the top million list. XYZ is on position 61 between the CCtlds .sg and .az
7:43 pm on Nov 4, 2015 (gmt 0)

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The Alexa 1 million thing is rubbish. It might look authoritative but it is not and should not be relied upon as an indication of development of TLDs.

Regards...jmcc
1:02 am on Nov 5, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Seems like the usage of these are trickling into the mainstream. I've seen them here and there. I think the public will accept it and maybe even remember them.

I don't believe keywords are as important anymore, especially in a domain name. If the keyword helps identify what you sell, like RiversEndTackle, then that's good and makes sense because that's the name of the store and can be memorized and understood. If it's done for the search engine then that's starting a long march in the opposite direction of where you really want to be.

I'm not being "holistic" or feel good about this either (SEOs who use the word "holistic" lose credibility with me when they say it, lol). It's a pragmatic choice that opens up a wide range of possibilities for coming up with a business name that addresses an aspiration, captures a feeling or is simply memorable. Otoh, I'm against willful San Francisco area trend for opaque names, like a pizza joint called Boot and Shoe Service, that kind of thing.
6:52 am on Nov 5, 2015 (gmt 0)

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Ultimately BRANDS COMMAND, and to get there a whole lot more than the web is required. A URI of any kind has to be KNOWN to generate stellar performance, regardless of TLD.

Meanwhile, any comparison which NEGLECTS .com stats for same ain't worth the salt.
3:32 pm on Nov 5, 2015 (gmt 0)

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1. How often do I see a startup move from a .io or .whatever to a .com? Far more often then I see the process move in the other direction.

2. The new .keyword domains offer a sales pitch that reminds me of the sales pitch for .mobi, .biz, .travel, .info. Here's how that went: the windup, the pitch . . the ball in the dirt

3. .keyword domains come with "value pricing". My interpretation of that? Suck as much money (value) out of the pockets of the "excited" before the firework fizzles -> dud. They might be more fun to play with without "value pricing". I suspect, once hard cold reality sets in, we'll be seeing the likes of $1.00 .infos (remember them) in the abundance of new gTLDs. Then it's SpamORama round 14, 15, 232, . . So, get in and get out before the facade is burnt to the ground.

4. .nyc or .miami? They gain a bit of momentum by their local political / governmental endorsement and their restrictions on registration (if that sticks). All politics are local, so I can foresee that politics certainly will follow. Who gets to register, play with and who gets to object to BestHotel.miami? Gay.miami? Sex.miami? Nightclub.miami or .nyc? Perhaps, once the political headache gets painful enough, the localized gTLD market will collapse. Interesting times on the local gTLD front.

AFAIC, there's a large component of "money grab" going on with the new world, unlimited gTLD project. Money for those clever enough to "scale" the process and grab as many speculative dollars as possible while the getting is good. Money for ICANN's bosses, for more jobs for friends and family (basic government 101) / travel / conferences / etc.

My crystal ball is clearer looking backwards than forwards when it comes to new gTLDs. Most have bombed. What's so new, different and improved with "unlimited", "value priced", oh, and did I say unlimited - .law, .lawyer, .lawyers, .esq, .attorney, .attorneys . . . maybe .bankruptcylawyer, .injurylawyer, .familylaw . . .

IF there's any residual weighting added for keywords in URLs what I see is continued dissipation for that variable. Why wouldn't that be the case with the advent of unlimited gTLDs . . and a new round of folks attempting to exploit it, across a 1,000+ new gTLDs? The weight may soon go to "0".

YMMV. My advice: nibble but don't bite. I haven't nibbled on a new gTLD since biting on a few .info and .biz domains. I think I'm currently holding onto 3 keyword .infos - having let all others drop or fall into scheduled drop. The one's I hold is 99% motivated by the fact that I paid too much for the experiment / vanity plate . . and 1% for sentimental reasons. I think I've dropped all my .biz domains. I never touched .mobi. I could smell it's death before it was aborn.

The only non-.com domain that has ever made much sense to me as a long term strategic choice was, and continues to be, .Org.
1:13 am on Nov 7, 2015 (gmt 0)

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I still find .net useful. It, too, is among the "legacy" TLDs from the early days. Used to be the choice for domains ran

.com
.net
.org
10:09 pm on Nov 9, 2015 (gmt 0)

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I registered .net back in the day the Yahoo directory charged $300 a year for .com, but free for .net & .org but I also saw the value of registering the .com so I've always kept a forward on that, as well as a common typo.

1 or two requests per month are for the .com (if that.) It is barely worth the annual fee *however* I keep it as a defensive tool so others can't register it. I also do this with my trademark. Wouldn't want some opportunist to ransom it back to me.
2:12 am on Nov 10, 2015 (gmt 0)

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As an aside, the "auto complete" functions built into most browsers these days might have some impact on what is being "typed" in the address bar...

ie. "cbs" brings up the broacaster site, the video site, the news site, the ... and the vast majority are .coms

Wonder how much the browsers have to do with how tlds are handled.
3:32 am on Nov 10, 2015 (gmt 0)

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1. How often do I see a startup move from a .io or .whatever to a .com? Far more often then I see the process move in the other direction.
Seems to be part of the VC process that the .COM must be acquired if the US market is being targeted.

2. The new .keyword domains offer a sales pitch that reminds me of the sales pitch for .mobi, .biz, .travel, .info. Here's how that went: the windup, the pitch . . the ball in the dirt
They are, in some cases, very different from the .mobi/biz/info/travel TLDs in that they are far more specific. The .mobi/biz/info/travel were quite generic, in their own way. Many of the new gTLDs are specifc. This means that they follow ccTLD dynamics moreso than .COM or gTLD dynamics.

3. .keyword domains come with "value pricing". My interpretation of that? Suck as much money (value) out of the pockets of the "excited" before the firework fizzles -> dud. They might be more fun to play with without "value pricing". I suspect, once hard cold reality sets in, we'll be seeing the likes of $1.00 .infos (remember them) in the abundance of new gTLDs. Then it's SpamORama round 14, 15, 232, . . So, get in and get out before the facade is burnt to the ground.
Some of this is to target domainers rather than developers. The whole ICANN process was expensive and these registries have to make money. They are not non-profit early ccTLD registries run by well-meaning but clueless academics. They are businesses. The $1 domains have already been seen and they have inflated the zones of some of the new gTLDs.

4. .nyc or .miami? They gain a bit of momentum by their local political / governmental endorsement and their restrictions on registration (if that sticks). All politics are local, so I can foresee that politics certainly will follow. Who gets to register, play with and who gets to object to BestHotel.miami? Gay.miami? Sex.miami? Nightclub.miami or .nyc? Perhaps, once the political headache gets painful enough, the localized gTLD market will collapse. Interesting times on the local gTLD front.
Why should it collapse? Not everyone views such things as domainers. There is development in .NYC though there is also some overlap with the registrant's existing primary websites and they are typically .COM domains. These markets have the capability to develop like ccTLDs and the first few years of their growth will be slow. However they may gradually gain market share. The problem with thinking of these city gTLDs in purely domainer terms is that it misses a very important point in ccTLDs (the city gTLDs are, in effect, the equivalent of small to medium level ccTLDs). The extension in a ccTLD does not matter because people identify with the ccTLD as being their TLD. Thus the old .COM domainer rules of generic keyword domains don't have quite the same effect because the market is smaller and more focused.

My crystal ball is clearer looking backwards than forwards when it comes to new gTLDs. Most have bombed. What's so new, different and improved with "unlimited", "value priced", oh, and did I say unlimited - .law, .lawyer, .lawyers, .esq, .attorney, .attorneys . . . maybe .bankruptcylawyer, .injurylawyer, .familylaw . . .
Not all have bombed (or have become zombie TLDs). Some are showing signs of development. (I ran a full web usage survey on all available new gTLDs in October so my view of their development would be somewhat better than most.) If anyone is looking to make a fast profit, then they may well be out of luck. This is not the open landrush of TLDs in the past. It is a business. The registries can hold back premium domain names for auction and can even engage in self-dealing. There's a great quote from the movie 'Rounders', "Listen, here's the thing. If you can't spot the sucker in your first half hour at the table, then you are the sucker." And that definitely applies to ccTLDs and new gTLDs.

Regards...jmcc
12:51 pm on Nov 10, 2015 (gmt 0)

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we are building a network of websites with the .camera extention. For niche sites that serve a niche purpose they are great I believe. Marketing both online and offline will come easy as well. But one has to have a plan. You can`t just jump the bandwagon and get your site in a similar domain fashion.
8:03 pm on Nov 10, 2015 (gmt 0)

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There was one extension I specifically liked and would have been very applicable for my industry however the keyword.extension has already been taken by someone who already has thousands of names ... they can keep it and the remainder.
9:18 pm on Nov 10, 2015 (gmt 0)

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I wonder how successful these domain sitters are?

Do they ever make back their investment of tying up domain names in hopes somebody like RedBar might pay a ransom like price? Time or two I've run into this myself and most times their reply/offer was so ridiculous I smiled and moved on, knowing they owned it, and would have to keep paying to own it, and they would never get a return for that investment.
11:09 pm on Nov 10, 2015 (gmt 0)

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I've seen people pay thousands for TLDs (against my advice.) They work for the big players, but for the average site they're irrelevant IMO.
 

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