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How to truly be private and anonymous.

Ensuring DomainA.com and DomainB.com are never connected.

   
12:18 am on Apr 10, 2009 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I want to start a blog about a subject (perfectly legal and family friendly) but I want to be completely anonymous. I run another site about this subject, and I would need to ensure that the 2 sites could never be connected in any way. I would want it to be so that visitors to this new site would never be able to find out that I run this other site. I would also need my own info (name, address, phone) to be virtually unfindable.

Now, a private domain registration is obvious. But is it like... guaranteed to do what I mentioned above? Or are there still ways around it? Someone savy enough could figure it out? It would be a fairly tech savy audience reading this blog, so if anyone would be able to do it, they would.

My other question is, if a private registration isn't going to be as private as I need it to be, what else can I do to accomplish what I'm looking to do?

Thanks in advance for any help.

1:00 am on Apr 10, 2009 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



It would also help for the sites not to be served by same server or server/service provider, and not look alike e.g. not same CSS features.
Also, if you opt for anon domain registration, get one from one domain provider and the other from another e.g. one from GoDaddy proxy, the other from a different provider.
9:53 pm on Apr 10, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member topr8 is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



register it with a false name, use google blogger and change the dns to point to the blogger server (instructions on blogger)
5:12 pm on Apr 11, 2009 (gmt 0)

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registering it with a false name can have implications should the website ever become "big", involved in a legal situation or dispute surely?

I am just guessing here as I have never done that myself, I wouldn't recommend faking it

2:19 am on Apr 12, 2009 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Yeah, I'm in full agreement on not using a fake name.

Thanks for the suggestions thus far. Any other things I can do?

8:23 am on Apr 12, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member topr8 is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member




according to a search on google you can discover the owner of a private domain by asking the registrar and giving a reason, i haven't done it myself so cannot vouch for the authenticity of the information
11:27 pm on Apr 12, 2009 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Yeah, I read that too. It's what really made me want to try to see if there was some other way to truly stay private.

I never tried it, but is it possible to register a domain name using initials? Like could John Smith register as just J. Smith? Or John S. or less likely... J. S.?

Something tells me there's no real way to have it be as private as I'm looking for it to be.

12:20 am on Apr 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member encyclo is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



You're overlooking perhaps the easiest option - don't use your own domain. This is particularly easy when you want a blog, simply set one up at wordpress.com or blogspot.com or similar free hosted blog service.
1:10 am on Apr 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



At the end of the day, if you take some of the relatively easy steps as outlined here, does it really matter if 0.000019% of the population make a connection between the two sites?
Pulling the wool over the eyes of the remaining 99.999999% is good enough surely *_*
6:53 pm on Apr 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



encyclo: Yup, actually did think about that. But I kinda need/want the domain for all of the usual reasons for why people pick a domain over blogspot or wordpress.com.

Mr Bo Jangles: Ha, surprisingly it kinda does a little. But, it looks like it will have to do.

Thanks for the help, guys.

3:36 am on Apr 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

5+ Year Member



You might consider registering your new domain name under a company name. I believe this is acceptable even if you are a sole proprietor. A UPS Store or post office box could serve as your address. Of course you will want to verify this with your registrar.
4:10 pm on May 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



You know, that really p's me off if this is true that even though you PAID extra to have a private registration, that all someone has to do is contact the registrar and give them some baloney reason and they just give out our contact info?

Why on earth did we pay for these services then?

I have some of my domains registered privately for a reason. I have a couple of political opinion domains and I registered them privately so as not to provoke some whacko who does not agree with me to seek me out and murder me or something.

Has anyone found this out for sure?

11:24 am on May 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



WolfLover, Test it out. Visit your private registrar give a reason and see if you get your own informaton?
2:38 pm on May 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member netmeg is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



The rules aren't the registrars', they're ICANN's, I believe.

There is no 100% way to be completely private and hidden (and not risk losing your domain) I've had to issue three PPOs over the years on various cyberstalking issues where I'm reasonably sure the information came from looking it up in WHOIS. For that reason, on many of my domains, I use a role account, like DNS Manager, and a P.O. Box. I was told by someone who specializes in this type of law that there hadn't been any rulings by ICANN against this practice; I haven't kept up on it, so it may have changed. In which case if anyone ever wanted to push it, could be screwed. But if I go down, I'll go down being the biggest and noisiest pain in the butt you ever saw.

So - the short answer is, no. There's no way to 100% guarantee nobody will find out who owns the site. That's the nature of the web.

3:21 pm on May 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



Register a FREE blog on a 3rd party service and only access that service via a proxy server from another country, somewhere like Russia, so a subpoena can't reach the source and it's virtually untraceable.
5:03 pm on May 3, 2009 (gmt 0)



Get your Mom's sister and/or brother to buy the domain name.
(Assuming your Mom took your Dad's name in marriage).

Get your best friend who you trust to register the domain name.

Furthermore, get an attorney to help you "disappear" under a complicated trail of paperwork. (As long as you aren't doing anything illegal)

6:59 pm on May 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



Free blogs would be an option for some small non-authority blog site. He seems to target something else.

Have seen competitors running multiple e-commerce sites with different registrar names.

  • Owner: example1.com LLC
  • Address: mothers cousins neighbors friend (=MCNF)

    Nameservers, CSS and registrar are different. However the widgets they sell, company policies, and link portfolio style, uncover their true identity. Can't prove it though.

    Is it "FAKE"? - not really.

    If the MCNF files for the LLC and this is later sold to you (for $1), the address on the registrar log does not need to be updated to prove ownership.

  • 7:24 pm on May 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

    WebmasterWorld Senior Member netmeg is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



    Get your Mom's sister and/or brother to buy the domain name.
    (Assuming your Mom took your Dad's name in marriage).

    Get your best friend who you trust to register the domain name.

    The thing is, if there ever *is* any kind of an issue, that means you may be putting that person at risk of being dragged into it. Which, depending on the nature of the likely issue, could be anywhere from a minor inconvenience to a major pain in the butt. Just something that needs to be thought through first.

    9:55 pm on May 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

    WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



    I agree with Baseballguy, if you protect your name, it makes people look harder for the identity of the domain owner. If it's registered under someone else's name, it's a dead end for them.

    Also, there are companies who keep domain name registration history. Some get domain name registration information on newly registered domain names before the registration information is protected. This opens the door for your information to be exposed if you are the one who has registered the name.

    To me this means the only way to completely hide the ownership of the name is if someone else registers it and pays the registration for you.

    My solution is to find someone else in the biz to do you a favor by registering the name for 10 years. Then update the contact information with an email address using the actual domain name, and have the registrar forward the email to a free email account, which only you have access to. Change the password and you are in the clear.

    10:26 pm on May 3, 2009 (gmt 0)



    There's always a trail, but going to a public computer to register everything involved using an alias and sending cash through the mail to pay for it may work.
    11:26 pm on May 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

    WebmasterWorld Senior Member pageoneresults is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



    It would be a fairly tech savvy audience reading this blog, so if anyone would be able to do it, they would.

    And they will.

    Do not let your family or friends get involved, lawyers will send paperwork to anyone listed in Whois. That means Registrant, Administrative, Technical and Billing Contacts are at risk. I know, it has happened to me at one time. I fired the client and sent them on their merry way. Had no idea what the hell they were doing until after it happened.

    I feel like I've entered the Witness Protection Program or something. Here we all are discussing ways to hide. Would you really enjoy going through life looking over your shoulder in a situation like this? And, you have a savvy tech audience to boot? They'll figure it out. There are no secrets on the Internet. Karma. ;)

    What happens once they figure it out?

    1:19 am on May 4, 2009 (gmt 0)



    As long as you aren't doing anything immoral or illegal....
    What does it matter if the domain name is registered/owned by MCNF?

    Don't forget prepaid credit cards !

    edit: Forgive me for assuming....but this entire thread smells of something "fishy" going on by the OP.

    Are you partnered up with some people on 1 site and you are now trying to make a break and start the same kind of site without their knowledge?

    [edited by: BaseballGuy at 1:20 am (utc) on May 4, 2009]

    1:24 am on May 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

    WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



    BTW, if you use the same accounts, like Google AdSense or Analytics for example, your accounts are easily traced to find all sites with the same accounts.
    1:34 am on May 4, 2009 (gmt 0)



    Don't forget your link building efforts as well as your social media efforts...

    Not to mention you writing tone of voice (assuming you write content). It isn't that hard for an intelligent person to compare writing styles and draw a conclusion from that. After that all it would take is a carefully crafted/worded email (on the part of the person whom suspects you) for you to give yourself up.

    4:57 am on May 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

    WebmasterWorld Senior Member keyplyr is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



    Get plastic surgery, a sex change and file the prints off your fingertips.
    5:35 am on May 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

    5+ Year Member



    Open a PO Box account or a mail forwarding account. Use PayPal to pay for it. Register that using a proxy (anon) service. Put it on blogger and point the domain there. Use gmail (no originating IP address given) - add this address to your PayPal list and pay for your PO Box / forwarding account from that.
    7:24 am on May 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

    5+ Year Member



    Register a domain in the name of your wife/spouse/brother/sister/mother/father account and operate it yourself.
    2:19 pm on May 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

    WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



    Get plastic surgery, a sex change and file the prints off your fingertips.

    and pay a look alike to tongue-kiss mexican pigs until you're the next cnn headline and a death certificate is written in your name.

    4:16 pm on May 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

    WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



    according to a search on google you can discover the owner of a private domain by asking the registrar and giving a reason, i haven't done it myself so cannot vouch for the authenticity of the information

    I hear what you are saying but if you look at the websites of registrars they say that some people run sites that requires their identity to be protected or their lives could be in danger. And private registration will protect you from those dangers. I think this could be true sometimes. So would giving the registrar a reason for asking about who owns a domain be something that works?

    Some people really need to protect themselves.

    5:53 pm on May 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

    WebmasterWorld Senior Member suzyuk is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



    Get plastic surgery, a sex change and file the prints off your fingertips.

    LOL, actually more like ROFL, a bit extreme don't you think? maybe just take the tin foil hat off - it's the web, anyone determined enough will find a connection (cue x-files music) at some point you have to be who you are

    This 49 message thread spans 2 pages: 49