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Web fonts and reduced amount of data

     
12:47 pm on Nov 29, 2017 (gmt 0)

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HTTP compression allows the web server to compress a resource before sending it to the client.

Reducing the amount of data that needs to be sent across the network and web fonts are among them.

How to set code and increase compression for such resources as CDN is not enough?
1:17 pm on Nov 29, 2017 (gmt 0)

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WebmasterWorld Administrator phranque is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

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it depends on the font format being compressed.

Reducing font size with compression:
https://developers.google.com/web/fundamentals/performance/optimizing-content-efficiency/webfont-optimization#reducing_font_size_with_compression
4:12 pm on Nov 29, 2017 (gmt 0)

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WebmasterWorld Administrator martinibuster is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

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Go Fontless. What I did for a couple of my sites. All you do is declare whether you want serif or sans-serif. No more calling a font from another site or any of that. The user's device takes care of the rest.

What happens is that your site displays in the users default font, which is usually what displays best in their device. It will look great regardless of the device used to access your site. Win-win.

https://www.webmasterworld.com/webmaster/4804643.htm [webmasterworld.com]
6:28 pm on Nov 29, 2017 (gmt 0)

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WebmasterWorld Senior Member lucy24 is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

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which is usually what displays best in their device
And it's what they are used to reading, which can be a big help in long text blocks. (Why, why, why does “reader view” use sans-serif? Have programmers never noticed that in Roman script, all printed text uses a serif font?) The drawback is that the user's default is liable to be something ghastly like Times Roman.

In the rare case where I do need--or, ahem, strongly want--a specific rare font, I start by opening it in a font editor and stripping away all the extraneous characters. Headers rarely need anything beyond basic “typewriter” characters. By itself this should cut the font size at least in half. And keep it on your own site so the visitor doesn't have to do a whole new DNS lookup.
12:12 pm on Dec 5, 2017 (gmt 0)

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Thank you for all explanations and posts.