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Using Pixel fonts

     
10:16 am on Oct 6, 2009 (gmt 0)

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Hello, we'd like to use some custom fonts (pixel fonts at 8px) within our html pages, so that it matches the design of the Flash elements we're doing.

Is there a way for modern browsers to force a font download or perhaps render it in some mysterious way?

12:08 pm on Oct 6, 2009 (gmt 0)

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8points on a widescreen LCD monitor would be fairly unreadable, however to the second part of your question: Nothing reliable and there's enough mystery between IE and the other browsers that I shudder to think there might be OTHER mysterious ways! :)
12:21 pm on Oct 6, 2009 (gmt 0)

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Is there a way for modern browsers to force a font download

Not on my machine there's not.
12:22 pm on Oct 6, 2009 (gmt 0)

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CSS3 @font-face
but be ready to see major differences between browsers (as usual IE is by far the most deviant -also in IE8-)

There's an example at
[css3.info...]
and it only really works in safari/chrome, most recent versions of Firefox and Opera still get it wrong.

I think you should do it the other way around and use regular fonts in the flash as well as not expect identical fonts that are going to be used by the browsers anyway.

6:17 pm on Oct 7, 2009 (gmt 0)

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but be ready to see major differences between browsers (as usual IE is by far the most deviant -also in IE8-)

This is flat-out misinformation. In IE, if a font is converted to an EOT file (or an EOTL file - EOT without any DRM root-string stuff), the font will render exactly as it does when it's installed in the operating system. Exactly.
The browser makes no distinctions.

Using TTF or OTF files, the same goes for FF 3.5, Safari, Opera 10, and Chrome launched with web fonts enabled.
The font will be treated the same as if it was locally installed.

There are, however, differences in the CSS syntax that have to be juggled a bit. But that's got nothing to do with the rendering quality.

I don't know what the problems are with the sample page you cite but there are plenty of examples now with web fonts working in every latest browser. And more being created every day.
search: web fonts panorama

9:50 pm on Oct 7, 2009 (gmt 0)

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This is flat-out misinformation
I was referring to the lack of support of IE for truetype and opentype , both of which are supported by the underlying windows OS. There's no reason why IE should not support it and demand that horrible .eot format only (a format no other browser will touch AFAIK).

If you read the CSS3 spec [w3.org] as it stands today, there is AFAIK no "a UA might just choose to only support one of the font encodings" provision. There are platform limitations etc. that allow font-face to be ignored, but none of them lets a browser dictate "one format only", when the platform supports the provided fonts.

As a matter of fact, as it stands today, IE will not work with *any* of the examples in the standard ...

It's the usual tactic of MSFT when faced with standards, nothing new, they did the same with all of CSS for many years, and still do the same with SVG, CSS3, etc.

 

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