Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 34.207.152.62

Forum Moderators: not2easy

Message Too Old, No Replies

Validation warnings.

Ignore?

     
12:57 am on Jun 9, 2008 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member

joined:June 29, 2003
posts: 1676
votes: 0


Warnings (6)
URI : http://example.com/css/css.css
20 Same colors for color and background-color in two contexts .body-text and .left-header
20 Same colors for color and background-color in two contexts #logo and .left-header
23 Same colors for color and background-color in two contexts #logo and .right-header
23 Same colors for color and background-color in two contexts .body-text and .right-header
35 Same colors for color and background-color in two contexts #logo and #copyright
35 Same colors for color and background-color in two contexts .body-text and #copyright

Got some interesting warnings on a page through the W3C validator. I am assuming that they are 'over kill' warnings in this case. None of the 'contexts' noted are relevant, i.e., #logo and .right-header are completely independent. They are not contained within any block other than the body. In this case, #logo is used with an <h1> and .right-header is used with an <h3>.

The CSS is:
#logo {
.right-header {

and not:
h1#logo {
h3.right-header {

Though this is the way the will probably always be used I didn't lock myself into that. Would it or should it matter?

This is entirely a black and white page; black body color and background, and nearly white 'interior' backgrounds that use #000 text. All text is black. All text appears on nearly white backgrounds with background-color: set at #fff.

2:02 am on June 9, 2008 (gmt 0)

Preferred Member

10+ Year Member

joined:Feb 28, 2005
posts: 646
votes: 0


It's an automated system that picks colours out... when it finds two that are the same for the foreground and the background, it will warn you.

It doesn't have the ability to check whether you've overlaid one atop the other, so it warns you -- so you can look and see if it does, or could.

As long as you've checked out all warnings and are sure a case will not arise that a black foreground element (with no background) sits on top of a black background element, then you're fine.

12:43 pm on June 9, 2008 (gmt 0)

Senior Member

WebmasterWorld Senior Member swa66 is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member

joined:Aug 7, 2003
posts:4783
votes: 0


I think they are much more important when you make a "template" CSS to be used by others crafting or generating the HTML.
When you make the HTML and CSS yourself and you aren't causing those to overlap, I think they can safely be ignored -till you change the HTML-.
 

Join The Conversation

Moderators and Top Contributors

Hot Threads This Week

Featured Threads

Free SEO Tools

Hire Expert Members