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Does a home link on the home page affect page rank?

generic navigations might affect PR

     
10:04 am on Sep 22, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Yes, I know PR is not that significant anymore, but this is if nothing else an interesting question :)

Considering that the links outbound from a page affect the page rank of the recipient page - what impact is had on having a link "out" from a page - but back to itself?

Most sites have a generic navigation across the entire site - and that often includes a link to the home page, which would then be replicated on the home page itself as well.

So, for example - we have a home page with 9 links to other pages, and one link to the home page, and each receiving page also has 10 links, with one back to the home page...

Pages 1-9 will get 10% of the PR each, and pass 10% of their own PR back home - but does the home page also gain 10% of its own PR as well from its own "self-link"?

In essence, if I remove the home link from the home page - the recipients then get 11% of the PR and their slightly higher PR then boosts the value of the link back home.

So, if google chops up the PR based on the number of links - but then ignores the PR boost from the "self-link", I would benefit from editing the home page to remove the self-link (and other pages with self-links).

If however, google does pass the PR from the self-link back to the same page - then I should keep the links in place as that would be a higher direct bonus.

All the online tools I have seen seem to ignore self-links - is that because they know they are ignored, or presume that they are ignored?

7:17 pm on Sept 22, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Been discussed several times, and I doubt there is a clear answer since by definition the benefit of the self link has to be fairly weak to that page. Still, self links show as backlinks, and they are very valuable in terms of canonical page and to detect some content thieves. Given the other benefits, I would always self absolute link a main page to itself.
2:44 am on Sept 23, 2005 (gmt 0)

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You are nuts, I'd leave it within the server. Anytime you try to play games like that they can come back to haunt you ten times over. Google has been getting hot to this type of stuff for a long time now: <a href="index.html">;)</a>
3:02 am on Sept 23, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Put your cursor over the webmasterworld logo on any page including the home page. Look at the bottom bar.
3:05 am on Sept 23, 2005 (gmt 0)

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p.s. don't forget the trailing /
4:55 am on Sept 23, 2005 (gmt 0)

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I make sure a page never links to itself including the home page just because it makes sense that visitors would not be interested. Is there a seo reason to link the home page to itself?
7:23 am on Sept 23, 2005 (gmt 0)

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If you wanna know, just do two sites with the same structure and only with this thing differing, and give them inbounds from the same pages to have exactly the same incoming PR. Wait until toolbar update or a few and see if there's a difference.
9:29 am on Sept 23, 2005 (gmt 0)

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I've tested it and the results show that self-links are counted for PR calculation, i.e they are treated as a normal link. Thus adding/removing self-links influences PR distribution.
1:44 pm on Sept 30, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Hi ,
though i am agree to all but would like to add one more thing here.
Is the style of ,link of home page on different inner pages to HOME page , affect the result
link:http://www.mydomain.com

I read on a forum that if we use different -2 anchor text , on different-2 page (5-5 pages )for the home page , then in that case google distinguish them , and shows them differnt blinks on link: operation.

Besides this , How the absolute path and relative path of the home page , on differnt pages affect the blinks of the index(home page or the site )page ,
when we use Link:http://homepage

9:36 pm on Sept 30, 2005 (gmt 0)

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I'm tempted to try linking my logo on the homepage back to the homepage just to see what happens. I kind of suspect it may make no difference at all.
11:04 pm on Sept 30, 2005 (gmt 0)

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How about multiple links on the home page back to the home page (or other)? In other words, if there are two links to the same page, does twice the PR get distributed to that page, or does the second link get ignored (and if so, does the # of links on the page get deducted by one so as not to waste passable PR)?

For example, if page A has two links to page B, and one to link to C, and those 3 links are the only outbound links on page A, then which is true:

1) 50% of PR goes to B, and 50% to C
2) 33% of PR goes to B, and 33% to C, and 33% wasted
3) 67% of PR goes to B, and 33% to C

(by "PR goes to", I mean the available PR weight that would be passed to that page)

From the basic theory of PageRank, I would assume #3, but I have never heard of anyone testing this. It would be easy for Google to modify their algorithm, even weighting something between choices #1 and #3, such as 60%/40% in that case.

12:58 am on Oct 1, 2005 (gmt 0)

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I've always thought the answer would be 1). I didn't think a page could "vote" for the same page more than once, so multiple links are ignored. Otherwise, wouldn't the PR system be too susceptible to manipulation?
8:55 am on Oct 1, 2005 (gmt 0)

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How about multiple links on the home page back to the home page (or other)?

I made some tests and they show that multiple links are not counted for PR calculation, i.e. the answer is 1).

10:33 am on Oct 1, 2005 (gmt 0)

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The PR benefit of linking a page to itself is likely to be nil or minimal.

There should be no penalty for linking a page to itself since many sites use SSI, etc for navigation and this typically leads to such links.

A sensible search engine should treat internal and external links separately for many reasons. However, I am not aware of any evidence that Google is sensible in this regard.

Kaled.

12:03 pm on Oct 1, 2005 (gmt 0)

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The PR benefit of linking a page to itself is likely to be nil or minimal.

This depends on the linking structure. I have pages where the difference is significant. Of course, for many sites the difference would be almost negligible.

A sensible search engine should treat internal and external links separately for many reasons. However, I am not aware of any evidence that Google is sensible in this regard.

PR calculation is (still) purely structure dependent, i.e. there is no difference between internal and external links. However, this doesn't mean that there is no difference in weighting the anchor text of incoming links.