Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.198.222.129

Message Too Old, No Replies

Did Google switch definitions from Dictionary.com to Answers.com?

     
9:07 pm on Jan 26, 2005 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Within the last 30 minutes, clicking on "definition" in a SERP takes me to Answers.com instead of Dictionary.com. Is anyone else seeing this or do I need to run a spyware check (again)?
11:00 am on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I just noticed this, Google appears to now be using answers.com instead of dictionary.com for its word definition.

(sorry if this isn't news to anyone but it surprised me ;])

12:35 pm on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Yes they have. And like last time, when they totally removed the dictionary features, I am again peeved off with this. Leave good things as they are! It turns out Answers.com is not as good as Dictionary.com for all manner of things (etymology, acronym search, no direct link to thesaurus).

If Google are going to keep playing with this, I'm going to set up some QuickSilver methods to grab this information from elsewhere and forget using Google for my dictionary lookups.

12:38 pm on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



> forget using Google for my dictionary lookups.

Just use Firefox with easily switchable search engines that include Dictionary dot com among many others (shopping sites, auctions etc).

12:48 pm on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Well I'm a Safari user (I like FireFox, but its typography is awful) who hasn't bothered installing the multiple search engine hack yet :-) Perhaps I should, or I'll just use QuickSilver (Mac 'quick launch' style tool) which is designed for this sort of thing anyway.
2:29 pm on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



As usual I'm worried that this is old news and already talked about to death... but I've just noticed the Dictionary . com links at the top of Google SERPS are gone. Answers . com are being used instead.

Is any one surprised? I'm just susprised that Google kept Dictionary for so long.

The other quirk here is that the phrases seem to be longer. Previously "search engine optimisation" was seen as two words; "search engine" and "optimisation". Now there's a link to Answers page for "search engine optimisation".

8:53 pm on Jan 29, 2005 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



I don't fancy extra information than I asked for.

Why doesn't Google simply change it to define:keyword like [google.com...] for "Webmaster". I am pretty happy with the various definitions which define: command gives me. It's on target.

I clicked for the definition, not for a whole lot of articles from various sources, including wikipedia.

1:58 am on Jan 30, 2005 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



From a few quick searches, I certainly prefer the definitions given by Answer.

A search for 'Neil Armstrong' on both Answer.com and Dictionary.com shows very different results, so to me it's not difficult to see why Google made this switch. A good move I reckon.

2:03 am on Jan 30, 2005 (gmt 0)

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



If you don't mind my saying so, CleverKeys works great. Just highlight the word in question and let 'er rip. Of course, you add whatever url you wish into it, which, in my case happens to be Dictionary.com.
12:26 pm on Jan 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



Nice: [alexa.com...]
3:23 pm on Jan 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



I actually quite liked Dictionary.com..

lol man their traffic skyrocketed thanks to google

btw im new so hello :) Im active on Webmaster-Talk and The Webmaster-forums.net I plan to be as active or more active here

12:06 pm on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



For those of you that like Dictionary.com, you could install the FREE Dictionary.com Toolbar.

[dictionary.reference.com...]

I've been using it for a couple of years now and it's great.

1:16 pm on Feb 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

10+ Year Member



The obvious question that seems to have been overlooked is "WHY did they make the change?".

... especially when you consider that dictionary.com uses Ad$ense, and answers.com uses a well known adsense competitor.

 

Featured Threads

Hot Threads This Week

Hot Threads This Month