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Microsoft to limit access to security fixes

The latest tactic to combat piracy

     
7:07 pm on Jan 26, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Microsoft Plans Restrictions on Fixes [story.news.yahoo.com]

The new authentication system, announced Tuesday and due to arrive by midyear, will still allow people with pirated copies of Windows to obtain security fixes, but their options will be limited. The move allows Microsoft to use one of its sharpest weapons access to security patches that can prevent viruses, worms and other crippling attacks to thwart a costly and meddlesome piracy problem.
4:10 am on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

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This doesn't look any different than the validation process they are using with the new Anti Spyware tool.

It doesn't require REGISTRATION. I think it simply checks your Windows product ID against a list of known-bad ones, and asks for user validation if something doesn't look right. It's worth noting that ACTIVATION!= REGISTRATION, and no personal information is sent. I don't expect this will change that. If you're legal, it is totally harmless.

In my case, on all the computers it was run on it simply proceeded automatically without any user interaction at all, which I suspect is due to the fact that all of my our systems are running Volume License copies of XP, as many businesses do.

4:53 am on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

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AsI recall, there are two different processes when installing Windows XP- Activation... and Registration. I it the first, but not the second. (I had no choice on that, really). So, I have a legir copy of XP, but I am not "registered".

I still get the updates, right?

dave

6:08 am on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

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I still get the updates, right?

Absolutely, for now. Who know, they might change that down the road too, Dave. As long as their servers can read the proper identification from your OS, that is all that is needed to gather your updates.

I should also point out that it is not required to take all the updates available. That decision depends on your knowledge levels as to what might / can / does apply to each update. You know, how all those updates intersperse with the applications pathways and such. Hope I said that correctly, it'sa gittin late.

<polite close mouthed yamn>

6:14 am on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

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This does not affect auto update. You just have to have a real copy to download from the website. MS can never shut down pireted copies from getting security patches. There will always be a way around it.
6:15 am on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

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...larger agenda....

Requiring a Passport account to register Windows gives Passport a big leg up in the marketplace. MS would like to be ubiquitous on the web, and this would certainly help them.

There are others better qualified than I to discuss the implications of Passport and .net. I don't think that either the word "agenda" or "larger" is unfair, though.

Good starter discussion here...
What is Microsoft's .net?
[webmasterworld.com...]

10:03 am on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Another round of typical Microsoft bashing. Ho hum. Microsoft wants to give updates to people with legit software. To get those updates you need to be registered. What exactly is the problem? How is that different from any other company.

Woopeedoo, you have to use passport. Get over it.

If this was Apple or Redhat no one would give a fig, because this is the evil microsoft (woooo) people are up in arms.

Give me a break.

3:11 pm on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

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If this was Apple or Redhat no one would give a fig, because this is the evil microsoft (woooo) people are up in arms.

Give me a break.

Chris, I agree. And as for Microsoft being a monopoly, not even close. As long as other options are out there, you are completely free to choose something else. Apple or *nix - take your pick.

Microsoft has better marketing, therefore market share. Apple marketed to end users in the early days, Microsoft marketed to developers and hardware manufacturers, which offered much better results.

As for myself, I'd rather hate Walmart (the evil empire). To each his own.

4:37 pm on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

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But let's not think that this is just registering for a warranty. MS does have a larger agenda.

Microsoft wants to control your computer and who could blame them. The more control they have, the better the business position they're in. If you're willing to give up control of your system, little by little they will take it all from you. If you don't think so, you don't understand business, computers, or both. But I want control over my system, and through that control I have privacy via anonymity.

Tangent Alert:

Luckily, information seems to evolve just like biology. Just like the checks and balances at play in the natural world, Microsoft's closed software policies spawned wide-open Linux. To quote Jurassic Park, "Life (information) finds a way."

- Grant

6:26 pm on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

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...you have to use passport. Get over it.

If this was Apple or Redhat no one would give a fig

In my case, not so. I don't know about others. I simply don't want certain personal identifiers used for trivial stuff.

In the past, these have included use of Social Security number or credit card numbers as ID for low level transactions, like check cashing, etc... and, guess what, enough people felt the same way that the consensus is now with me.

In the case of MS Passport, the info request is not quite that invasive, but it's invasive enough that it bothers me. For a US Passport, the same info is appropriate. For MS, Apple, Redhat, or my corner store, definitely not.

Otherwise, I have no problem with registering my MS software, and in fact in the past I've preferred to do so.

8:21 pm on Jan 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

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Thanks, Pendanticist, for answering my question.

(I am a fairly ordinary computer user. If Microsoft tries to make me jump through hoops or give more personal info than I already have, I will resent it and I won't cooperate. I think a lot of users will feel the same. Microsoft should tread carefully if it wants to avoid losing its monopoly.)

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