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Mobile browser - which one is suitable?
For checking emails.
HarryM




msg:3554820
 5:58 pm on Jan 22, 2008 (gmt 0)

I need a mobile phone which can be used for browsing standard internet sites. Main use would be checking emails in various mailboxes when I do not have access to a PC. I get a lot of emails, so downloading them to an email client in the phone is not an option due to download costs. Most will be spam and will be deleted at the mailbox.

My understanding is that I need an HTML browser, rather than an XHTML or WAP browser. But phone specs don't give much information.

Anyone any advice on which browser or range of mobiles would suit best? (I don't need a camera or music, etc., just a phone, text, and browsing capabilities).

 

jtara




msg:3554984
 9:13 pm on Jan 22, 2008 (gmt 0)

Any of the above - with the exception of some VERY old WAP browsers - can be used to browse the general web.

The carrier's proxy server accesses the web sites, and translates the code as needed.

So, you are at the mercy of your carrier, and what capabilities they gave their proxy server.

In some (probably most) cases, you could also choose to use a third-party proxy server. Your carrier doesn't want you to know that.

phranque




msg:3555344
 3:58 am on Jan 23, 2008 (gmt 0)

a treo or other smartphone-type device?

dakuma




msg:3555358
 4:18 am on Jan 23, 2008 (gmt 0)

I currently use the Nokia E62 - best phone I've used thus far for email. Supports BlackBerry Connect as well, but unfortunately Fido still wants an arm and a leg for Connect access.

No camera, large screen, and a useable full keyboard, and much less than BlackBerry phones (such as the Curve). Only real negative I would say is the sluggish OS in the phone, it's not speedy but still useable.

As for spam, I forward my emails from work to a gmail account which filters the spam very nicely and does NOT download the crap to my phone.

[edited by: tedster at 5:27 am (utc) on Jan. 23, 2008]

jtara




msg:3555367
 4:29 am on Jan 23, 2008 (gmt 0)

While just about any phone sold today will do what you want, it could be very difficult to use, due to tiny screens and inconvenient user interfaces.

So, the previous comment is probably right - a PDA phone.

If you don't mind having the scroll and zoom, the high cost, and the lock-in period, the iPhone is also an obvious choice.

But consider other alternatives, such as the Nokia N800 or N810 and similar "small tablet" computer designs. It's not a phone at all, but can use your phone to access the Internet through a Bluetooth connection. (As well as, of course, WiFi connections.)(For Bluetooth you will need to make sure, though, that your carrier supports "tethered" operation.) This gives you a much larger screen (4.1 inch, 800x480) than any phone. And it runs Linux to boot.

As well, there is an emerging class of "mini-notebook" PCs, such as the Asus Eee PC. (Same resolution, larger screen, notebook form factor.)

Frankly, though, if I got that much email that I had to deal with on the road, I'd fix the spam problem (no reason to have that much spam) and get a Blackberry.

HarryM




msg:3555712
 1:01 pm on Jan 23, 2008 (gmt 0)

Thanks all.

I agree the best solution would be something like a Nokia Communicator E90. But none of the high end stuff is available with pay-as-you-go in the UK, and I can't justify an expensive contract for something that will only be used occasionally.

no reason to have that much spam

Jtara, you must be sitting on a fortune if you know how to eliminate spam!

I use a large number of message rules in Outlook Express to direct wanted emails to specific folders. I then delete the remainder as spam. Works very well, but obviously only after the emails have been downloaded. It would be difficult to duplicate this at the mailbox level.

jtara




msg:3555868
 3:19 pm on Jan 23, 2008 (gmt 0)

Jtara, you must be sitting on a fortune if you know how to eliminate spam!

I just have, unfortunately, plenty of experience with it, having had a domain swamped with spam due to a spammer using a return address in one of my domains.

I use a large number of message rules in Outlook Express to direct wanted emails to specific folders. I then delete the remainder as spam.

That's no way to deal with spam. You need good spam filters at the server. There are two basic approaches, which are usually combined for a successful strategy.

1. Filtering of spam based on identifying known spam sources or content. While there may be some free versions of this, it generally requires a commercial service with an extensive reporting network. Customers report spam to a central location. The first few pieces pass, but once recognized a filter is put in place and the rest are blocked. The probability of you being the recipient on one of the first spams before the filter is added is low.

2. Generic filtering, based on appearance of keywords, formatting and header quirks, etc. This catches even spam that hasn't been reported. This can include techniques such as Bayesian Filtering, although that particular technique has been rendered largely-ineffective due to the inclusion of random text by many spammers. (Put there specifically to defeat Bayesian Filtering.)

You might include in (2) or consider separately, white-listing and black-listing.

As somebody mentioned above, Gmail does a credible job of filtering spam. There are many other services, as well that manage to eliminate most spam. Many/most of them can fetch mail from your other accounts using POP, so you don't have to change your mail address(s).

There are various do-it-yourself implementations of (2), from server-side programs if you are running your own mail filter, to plugins for your mail client. Most of these, though, are ineffective today due to their use ob Bayesian Filtering.

Works very well, but obviously only after the emails have been downloaded. The filtering of wanted mail It would be difficult to duplicate this at the mailbox level.

You are using a form of whitelisting, and it certainly can be done before the emails have been downloaded. This is supported by the email provider that I use. I can enter filter terms that are used server-side to separate messages into folders on the server. If you use this option, you then access your mail using IMAP, rather than POP. (In order to be able to access the folders.)

While I don't have a Blackberry, my understanding is that this is a fundamental Blackberry feature. Spam aside, most Blackberry users don't want to see ALL of their mail on their Blackberry. Blackberry is more than a DEVICE, it is a SYSTEM for dealing with mail. So, you set up filters to route your mail into folders, and those filters are applied at the SERVER side. Your carrier provides that filter - it logs into your POP accounts, retrieves your mail, then filters and categorizes it. Maybe an actual Blackberry user can comment.

Do you think the member of the U.S. Congress (OK, more likely their assistants) who rely heavily on Blackberries are wading through V1agra ads? The filtering is what has made Blackberries so popular amongst heavy mobile email users.

You are only scratching the surface of anti-spam technology. If I were doing what you are doing, I wouldn't be doing anything but dealing with spam all day.

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