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Are flipping websites the best investments?
I say YES...
skunker




msg:3978268
 2:18 pm on Aug 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

Hello,
I'm in my late 20s and started building websites as an investment vehicle in 2005. Since then, I have sold around 100K worth and I just sold another today. While it was not much, it still beat any interest I've gained in my Roth IRA and money market accounts. Plus, it's FUN..and the hunt to develop the next great idea is what keeps me motivated!

Also, what I like to do is think of something I want to buy in the next 2-5 years...say...a new car...or a new house. I then build a website and plan to sell it within that time frame. So far this year I've purchased an airplane (20k) and acreage out in the country.

Disclaimer: I'm single...so that REALLY helps, too. But I figured I'd do what I can until I get to my mid 30s..then I'll settle down. OH yea, and I get to be self-employed. The best of both worlds.

Thoughts?

[edited by: skunker at 2:31 pm (utc) on Aug. 25, 2009]

 

wolfadeus




msg:3982070
 4:19 pm on Sep 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

To Jane_Doe and others who buy sites: How do you identify them? Based on SEO? Revenue? How do you calculate how much you would pay for a site?

chicagohh




msg:3982071
 4:19 pm on Sep 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

wolfadeus,

EDIT: I just read that you're working the travel sector. That industry is not as LOCAL as what I am talking about. Generally, a travel agent in Omaha can be as useful as an agent in Chicago. On the other hand, a dentist in Omaha is not at all interested in Chicago patients.

Your strategy is much different. You were inviting someone to pay for an advertisement on a page they don't own, they don't control and where they may not see the value. I am selling the entire site - with the content that ranks well. They can put all the ads they want on their own Web site - including a picture of themselves.

how do you stand out so that they recognize the actual value of your proposal?

I am always experimenting, but I position the Web site as a better advertising model for the future than say - the local Yellow Pages. Once purchased, the Web site is only $8 per year with $8 per month hosting costs. This is MUCH cheaper than Yellow Pages and newspaper ads. I contact several people at once and let them know that I am also pitching this to so-and-so.

I also don't talk site traffic unless there is a lot of it - which there is usually NOT for local niches. Some business owners are not able to understand the difference between 50 qualified visitors coming to their Web site each month and the readership numbers that newspapers like to talk about. Two VERY different types of traffic.

THE BEST TIP I CAN OFFER:

Price your product and price it to sell. What I mean is to pick a price that works and don't play each company against each other. Once you start playing with the sales number and asking them to "make me an offer" - you no longer sound like an Internet Marketing Consultant - well, at least you don't sound like one that knows what they are doing.

Jane_Doe




msg:3982099
 5:22 pm on Sep 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

To Jane_Doe and others who buy sites: How do you identify them? Based on SEO? Revenue?

I just make offers when I see undermonetized sites.

How do you calculate how much you would pay for a site?

I have an exact scientific method I follow. :) I tell my husband about the site, ask him what he would pay for it, add to that what I would pay for it, divide by 2, and then lower that number by 30% for my opening offer.

On a per hour basis though buying sites isn't my most profitable activity, so I probably won't do much of it in the future. For me, I tend to get the best return on my time by writing articles.

skunker




msg:3982112
 5:40 pm on Sep 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

Truth is, people out there will buy your website. You can go to the places where people sell and buy websites (can we mention names?) and see what people are buying.

A general rule of thumb is take your monthly revenue x 24 (2 years worth) + a few other numbers (e.g. domain name age, # of quality backlinks, Page Rank, forum traffic, etc) and you will sell your site.

Here's an example, I put up a blog 3 years ago that makes about $150 a month. I sold it recently for $5000. Sometimes I get more money for my sites than I expected, other times I get less. Still, it's a good investment.

I also went back to look at the sites I sold a few years ago and hardly any of them are still active. Lots of times the new owners flip them, too.

oddsod




msg:3982157
 6:48 pm on Sep 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

wolfadeus, there've been many threads here discussing valuation:
How much is my site worth? [webmasterworld.com]
What is a site worth? [webmasterworld.com]
Selling/Buying an Adsense site [webmasterworld.com]
Selling your website for a decent multiple [webmasterworld.com]
others [google.com]

Yes and no. If you want to have a "best of breed" golf or skiing site, it's useful to be interested in (and to be knowldgeable about) golf or skiing.

Do you need to know about drilling for oil or investment banking to hold shares in oil companies and banks? The closer you are to the actual operation of the site the more your interest in the subject matters. I identified years ago that personal interest in the subject worked to hamper scaling.

There's only one site that I do it for now, a site about buying and selling internet businesses ... and that's because I don't consider it a proper business ;)

Tonearm




msg:3982172
 6:58 pm on Sep 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

My 'primary merchant account' is set up through my bank to handle each website as a distinct merchant account with it's own discount rate based on ticket average. Everything winds up under the umbrella of my company. Each website is essentially a 'brand' of that company. So, no merchant account hassles

D_Blackwell, do you have your different brands showing up on your customers' credit card statements, or does your company name appear for all of them?

webastronaut




msg:3982177
 7:06 pm on Sep 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

Where the heck do you live? A 100k in 4 years would put you out on the streets in southern California. And where did you find a plane for 20k? I wouldn't put that up in the air ;-)

I never like to say how much I make but do have a couple sites that I run that make a whole lot more than that and they pretty much run on "auto pilot".

D_Blackwell




msg:3982217
 7:49 pm on Sep 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

D_Blackwell, do you have your different brands showing up on your customers' credit card statements, or does your company name appear for all of them?

Each website/brand shows on the credit card statement; not the company. It is my option to put on the websites, " A Company X brand.", or some such. My original plan was to use the parent company for all, and then explain to the customer, "Your statement will show this purchase as from Company X." One sees these disclaimers all the time.

Absolutely NOT an option with my bank to use one company for every website. Each website is treated as 'a company', and must have its own 'sub-merchant account' (for lack of a better phrase). Each site must pass their review and security checks. They show up on credit cards statements as unique companies.

However, just as I consider each website/brand to be a part of the whole company, with all of the money eventually flowing in and out of the same hopper - they are separate on the surface; to the eyes of the customer - and also to the bank.

It's kind of a master merchant account, where I am approved to do business with them, with 'sub-merchant accounts', where each website is approved as 'passing muster'.

Not what I originally had in mind when changing merchant accounts, but they have their way and it is take it or leave it. Overall, I am extremely pleased. Fairly small, local bank, known in the area, not one of the monoliths by any means.

I get merchant account statements each month for each site, showing the transactions and fees for each.

No setup fees, security compliance fees, or any junk fees of any kind. My discount rates are excellent. Frankly, I'm surprised not to be charged a combined setup/PCI compliance review fee each time, but none at all. Doesn't hurt that I am very well organized and ready to go. If I call up with a new website, it is ready for them to begin the approval process. Since I already know their quirks, they come back with minimal requirements for changes or server security issues; though there is always something (usually something stupid). The first one was the most hassle because they really do not have a good checklist of their onsite requirements regarding published refund policies, contact information..... They aren't perfect. And, the 'time pressure' of having more work than they can do is, though unstated, clearly palpable. All the more reason to be an 'easy client'.

Jane_Doe




msg:3982403
 1:29 am on Sep 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

Where the heck do you live? A 100k in 4 years would put you out on the streets in southern California.

The OP also said, "Selling sites is not the only thing I do. I actually am a freelancer web designer so that takes up time, too."

MrWumpus




msg:3982777
 4:52 pm on Sep 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

@chicagohh - This is great info but I was wondering do you change these sites for the client after the sale? Meaning, if you're targeting local dentists generically, then the Google SERPS are going to be generic for that site's listings at the time of sale. Do you just sell it based on the fact that it ranks well for the phrase "your town chiropractic" and let them deal with changing it to "joe smith, your town chiropractic"?

stevegpan2




msg:3982783
 4:56 pm on Sep 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

I remember I received emails tried to sell web site with page rank 6 or 7, for like thousands of dollars. Of course, the pr value is fake.

chicagohh




msg:3982795
 5:08 pm on Sep 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

I don't touch the sites after the sale - unless the buyer pays me to make the changes. Most of these sites are done in Wordpress or Dreamweaver. Each of which makes editing the files a snap.

The sites are sold based on where they are positioned in the search engines and their unique content.

Tonearm




msg:3983015
 9:11 pm on Sep 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

Thanks D_Blackwell. I was told in another thread here that the only option was to have the same company name appear on the customers' statement for all of the stores. Which way do you think is ideal?

D_Blackwell




msg:3983052
 10:54 pm on Sep 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

.....the only option.....

That depends upon your merchant account provider. With my previous provider I, and all of my websites, were one entity. Period. Made no difference to them. I paid one fee schedule for all, whether the the average ticket on a site was $25 or $100. Not that I'm getting a huge extra discount rate on higher dollar sites, but each site gets its fair standard.

Switching to my local bank, where I have been developing a larger and larger relationship over several years (not huge - I'm just a drop in the bucket.), I eventually looked into adding their merchant account services. It was a much better deal than what I had, so a gave them a taste and set up an account and put a couple of sites with it. I've been very happy. The discount rates are fair (excepting Discover and AMEX), and no junk fees. I take Discover (it's not that much more) but am a little surprised that they don't drop ME because we give them so little action. They have to be losing money on us just in sending statements. AMEX terms are ridiculous. May drop Discover, because I am almost embarrassed to be doing so little business. Anybody with a Discover card has got a Visa or MasterCard anyway. I only keep it because it looks good to add Discover to our grouping of logos.

When I made the change, I anticipated the same type of 'all one company' setup. NO. Not an option with them. Not open to discussion. That's just not the way they work. They are happy to tie the flow of funds into 'the' company and 'the' company accounts, but every website is required to be treated, on the surface', as a separate entity.

To actually answer your question, I especially like this for one major reason. The website that the customer buys from appears on their statement. This eliminates:

A) Explaining on the website, as one sees so often, that 'The charge will appear on your statement as ABC, Inc.'

B) People forgetting what we explained on the website and seeing a charge from a company that they don't remember doing business with. This happens to me all the time. I buy something, and when the statement comes I have to figure out what the heck this company and dollar amount are for.

BTW - Make sure your fees are settled monthly, and not 'on the fly', or you will never be able to reconcile anything to a high degree of certainty. This was a big deal to my accountant. Since I dump all of this on him and he gets a nice fat rate, I pretty much do anything he wants anyway he wants. I'm a very small fish in his pond and lucky to have him. He costs, but I have no problems. (Interesting how sometimes I want to be the big fish in the little pond {my sites}, and other times I want to be the little fish in the big pond {professional services - provided I am getting the top dollar service that I pay for}.)
....................

As an aside, it was just chance that I fell in with this bank in the first place. I had always been with another bank in town. Customer service was always terrible, but I never needed much, so overlooked the problem.

I literally live across the street form Bank B in a remodeled 1920's apartment building in the downtown area. Three story, ten unit building with eight parking spaces that will 'technically' hold ten cars. With 215,000 miles on my vehicle, I lucked into an awesome deal on a car that had to be taken. (Still plan to drive the wheels off of the first one.) Bank B has excess parking availability so I walked over, explained my situation to one of the vice presidents and got the okay to park a vehicle there pretty much permanently; no problem. Small town. In appreciation, I closed an account at the other bank the next day and began calling it my $25,000 parking space. Over time, I closed one account after another at Bank A and moved everything. Their customer service (for a bank) is top notch. Bank A noticed that I was closing out my accounts and on one occasion I was asked why. Responding that the customer service at Bank B blew them out of the water and that I would probably be closing all of my accounts, it got quiet. No comment. No pitch to keep me. No anything. Though a drop in the bucket, my drop is bigger than the average customer, and zero interest or effort to keep any of my business. The bigger cost is how many times I've told the story of my $25,000 parking spot and how it eventually led to closing every account at Bank A.

Fortune Hunter




msg:3983105
 2:04 am on Sep 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

So had you held them and grown them into full fledged monetized properties

Are the different ways outside of eCommerce or AdSense that you can monetize a site?

Here are some of the businesses that I sell to:
Home Improvement
Law
Dentistry
Chiropractors
Accountants
Anything cosmetic

Are you creating a web site that promotes each of these business specifically or you just creating a content based site around these indstries and then selling to someone that wants to own a content rich site?

I guess I am trying to see why they would pay you more money after you have built a site like this than just pay you (or another webmaster) to build the site for them in the first place instead of buying from you later at a premium.

I would also ask, how many of these can you build in a local area before it is saturated? I would guess there is some kind of limit to how many "content rich lawyer" sites can be sustained in a local market.

incrediBILL




msg:3983108
 2:23 am on Sep 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

Are the different ways outside of eCommerce or AdSense that you can monetize a site?

AdSense is just one alternative because a good evergreen site with a lot of traffic can easily get site sponsors, direct advertisers, sell leads or even become a subscription site depending on whether it has any community building aspects.

How much money you make off a site depends on the type of site and how creative you are.

chicagohh




msg:3983127
 3:13 am on Sep 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

Are you creating a web site that promotes each of these business specifically or you just creating a content based site around these industries and then selling to someone that wants to own a content rich site?

Content rich is a bit of a stretch considering they are 5 to 10 or 12 pages in size. Anyhow, they are sites describing the business.

I guess I am trying to see why they would pay you more money after you have built a site like this than just pay you (or another webmaster) to build the site for them in the first place instead of buying from you later at a premium.

I am not selling potential... I am selling a tool - an advertising platform that is done. I am selling search engine positions based upon targeted keyphrases that describe what the business is selling.

Sure, anyone can order a better looking Web site than the ones I build, but can they absolutely guarantee #1 search positions? No.

This is not difficult stuff.

how many of these can you build in a local area before it is saturated?

If I was in any way concerned about that I would never speak so openly about my little side business. Three reasons:

1. Some people will never understand how to build, promote and sell small Web sites.

2. Experience has shown me that VERY FEW people will even try to make money this way. They will ask 100's of questions, but for some reason will never put it to the test.

3. Thousands of services and hundreds of thousands of valuable keywords to rank for mean the market will not be saturated for a long, long time.

This is not my main source of income or I may have kept quiet regardless of my reasons mentioned above.

wolfadeus




msg:3983285
 10:02 am on Sep 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

"Sure, anyone can order a better looking Web site than the ones I build, but can they absolutely guarantee #1 search positions? No."

But can you guarantee that the websites you sell will continue to rank well in the future? Have you had any complaints after a website was sold and dropped at the SERPs?

skunker




msg:3983349
 1:00 pm on Sep 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

The people buying my sites are everyday folks, dads, professors, mothers, businessmen, etc. They are not people that post here on webmasterworld. I suppose they are looking at my sites as investment vehicles, but believe it or not, the latest buyer was simply a teacher looking for a website his 12-year old son can maintain and update. I love these buyers, they are a joy to work with.

Hugene




msg:3983372
 2:23 pm on Sep 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

I also went back to look at the sites I sold a few years ago and hardly any of them are still active. Lots of times the new owners flip them, too.

so I guess they are not
looking at my sites as investment vehicles

skunker




msg:3983392
 2:59 pm on Sep 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

Hugene,
Why not? They buy them, flip them, too? They made more money than what they bought it for...who knows.

Tonearm




msg:3983574
 8:05 pm on Sep 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

Thanks again D_Blackwell. I suppose having the name of the website on which the customer placed their order appear on their statement would be ideal in all situations.

I'm unhappy with my current processor and I was planning on moving to Costco's. Last I checked they require the 3-digit code for the lowest rate though, and I hate asking customers for more info, especially since fraud is not a problem on my site. They also require a 2-year contract. Maybe I'll look into the local banks, although I may move at some point.

I just checked and it looks like Costco has moved from NOVA to Elavon so maybe some of this has changed.

Sounds like I should be looking for a processor that will present different website names on the customer's statement based on where the order was placed, and not charge fees on the fly like my current processor does.

[edited by: httpwebwitch at 6:44 am (utc) on Sep. 4, 2009]
[edit reason] no URLs, thanks [/edit]

D_Blackwell




msg:3983649
 9:43 pm on Sep 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

Last I checked they require the 3-digit code for the lowest rate though, and I hate asking customers for more info, especially since fraud is not a problem on my site.

Our fraud rates couldn't be lower, in part, because the majority (though not all) of our products lines do not invite fraud to get at the merchandise. Most of our products are more 'specialized', and not easily monetized, i.e., we are not selling the hot electronics and such.

However, the security code is not an unreasonable extra request, and is so common now that it will not bother most people. It was a major issue when it first began to be implemented because it was so poorly implented. Only a few merchants asked for that number, and it made customers NOT trust them, and what a PITA to explain (on the phone, and burning valuable customer service time) that this was a 'security upgrade' - that it made it more likely that they were legitimate customers.

It was very poorly rolled out in my opinion (zero public/customer education) - and companies that got pushed into early adoption literally paid a high price in dealing with doing the job of educating the public. I was there.
......................

On top of that, security number has two big problems.

1) They wear away easily and are impossible to read. This has now been addressed by some, though not all, card issuers that have upgraded the quality of the printed number.

2) The numbers are so small, many customers, especially our older customers, have great difficulty reading them correctly. Some, though not all, card issuers have also addressed this and made the numbers larger. I take a piece of scotch tape (I know, I'm not respecting the brand.) and tape over these numbers so that they will not wear away.
......................

The whole rollout of asking for security numbers, and providing them on the cards so that they were user friendly were both clusterf. . .

However, at this point, it is pretty much standard. We are required to get this number, and it must match. This is not optional with my merchant account.
......................

This does vary. You can get a merchant account that;

1) Does not require the security number.

2) Allows you the option of using the number or not.

Definitely expect a higher fee for an account that does not require the number or if you choose not to use the number. The risk is, for the moment, somewhat higher.
......................

My merchant account absolutely requires the security number and a match. No match = declined. (Almost all credit card typ0s are in the expiration date, BTW.)

I have the option of using AVS. Not using AVS automatically adds .8% fee to each transaction. I require AVS attempt for the obvious reasons. A match is not required however, and I am not penalized for a 'no match'; paying the standard rate for the 'best effort' attempt to verify. Allowance is made for the fact that a lot of customers don't know where they live or otherwise can't connect Dot A to Dot B. It's true. People will give a PO Box for the billing address (and it is does not match the official card address) and give the street address for the shipping address. We get 'no match' or only a zip match on the card - and of course the shipping address is no good because USPS won't deliver to their street address. So - we have to call and explain the non-validating address and it's, "Oh, it needs to go to the PO Box. Oy vey!

And there is no shortage of customers that put their shipping information in the billing information field and make no effort to provide both, so we don't get an AVS match; usually resulting in a zip match only. People.

It doesn't cost us anything, and we do not have fraud issues, but an AVS exact match requirement would kick out enough orders that we would have to do some redesign on every site to make people understand that if we do not get an exact match, then their order will not go through. We are prepared to do this, but we can't put everything in big, bold, red, in four different places on a page. LOL A certain percentage of customers are, and will always be, stupid.
......................

The addition of the security number is not much of a long-term solution, IMO. It does add some measure of security because many people with stolen data will not have the number, but they are adapting. They know they will need it - they will get it.
......................

One issue, IMO, is the ridiculous amount of time that many cards are good for. I regularly process cards that expire in 2014, 2015. This is insane. I was sent one of these and refused it. Called customer service and said that I would not accept a card that was valid for six years. They expressed their 'surprise', but sent me a two year card. I wasn't asking; though I was very polite.

JStubblefield




msg:3983705
 11:58 pm on Sep 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

I used to do this a few years back on ebay. I had a reseller account and would also ask that they host with me. But if not I would MOVE the site for them for a fee or they could move it themselves.

My main sellers were pre-built open-source photo rating sites.. Kind've like hotornot.com but base it on a niche market.. Like redheads or bbw, etc.. I sold most for $150 plus $4.95 hosting per month. I also included a forum and a dating area and made the areas all LOOK the same as far as design goes eventhough it used about 3 or 4 totally seperate scripts. I had it down to about 2 hours worth of work (changing colors, etc.)

They were not making money when I sold them but I also included a great e-book that I had resell rights to for beginners getting traffic secrets that sort've thing. Plus the areas HAD money areas using paypal for upgrades etc..

I also did REAL well setting up photo rating sites using CARS and MOTORCYCLES as a niche... At one time I had <snip>.com, <snip>.com and others like that..

But then ebay went CRAZY with their listing fees and other fees and it just wasn't worth it...

If I ever do this again (thought about since I am like SKUNKER in the fact that I LOVE building them). I am working on a twitter like site that I may sell but it has an adult based name, but on the flip-side its a great site would just need someone to get it out there...

You would be surprised what people will buy! And I say that in a good way.. I would NEVER do a made for adsense type CARBON COPY site. But put it this way I once sold <snip>.com for close to $300! matter of fact I have an excel spreadsheet that' I'll dig up and post some things up here so we can get an eye for what people were buying and how much the paid in the GLORY DAYS...lol I doubt any of the sites are still around they are probably all parking pages but its not like I didn't start them off in the right direction.. I was even doing all sizes of banners for them to include in the sell and a list of places to get links to their sites (directories, forums, etc..)

[edited by: bill at 6:23 am (utc) on Sep. 4, 2009]
[edit reason] removed specific domains [/edit]

Fortune Hunter




msg:3984240
 6:50 pm on Sep 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

I am not selling potential... I am selling a tool - an advertising platform that is done. I am selling search engine positions based upon targeted keyphrases that describe what the business is selling.

I understand what you are doing. It is similar to setting up a magazine, albeit much smaller, and then selling ad space based on the content and readership you developed. I can also see why someone would be interested in doing this that wouldn't do it on their own, but I guess I am stuck looking at this from a webmaster point of view.

If someone called you, say a lawyer, and said he wanted you to build him a site and write some articles and do SEO to rank it well, would the price you would charge him to do that from the beginning be the same as the price you would charge him if you pre-built this and ranked it well and sold it to him later?

Looking at this from my webmaster filter I guess what I am wondering is why someone would ask you to build them a site from scratch and simply pay you to do all the same activities and just pay you as you performed them as opposed to paying you for a site once it was all finished and ranking well. At least with the later option I could have some input on the color, layout, specific content, etc. Once you build it and sell it to me I pretty much take it as you have it.

I see it as being similar to a builder. A builder can build you a custom home to order based on your specs and requests or they can go out and build a home ahead of time and then sell it you later after it is all finished and you don't have to go through the hassle of managing the building process etc. You simply buy a finished house ready to go. However in both cases if the end house is the same I am guessing the end price you pay is also the same.

Applying that to your model are you simply pre-building a web site and selling it later or do you earn a premium above and beyond what you would charge a person the same fee if they asked you to do this for them from the beginning and simply paid you as you went through the project?

httpwebwitch




msg:3984330
 8:37 pm on Sep 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

>> However in both cases if the end house is the same I am guessing the end price you pay is also the same.

In my experience, that is rarely true. On a custom project, say if I was working freelance to develop a new site, I would charge by the hour and the risk of failure is shouldered by the client, but so too is the windfall if the site succeeds.

If it's a self-managed project intended to be sold later, I may spend the same # of hours on the project but the end price depends on its success, and the selling price is determined by annual revenue, analytics stats, rankings, etc. If the site fails, the less-valuable site would be cheaper to buy than if it was contracted from the getgo.

In one case, the price is more or less fixed (my hourly rate) and the site's value is undetermined. In the other, the site's value is the price. Could be much higher or lower than the expense incurred or billed by the developer. ;)

Fortune Hunter




msg:3984380
 9:28 pm on Sep 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

I may spend the same # of hours on the project but the end price depends on its success, and the selling price is determined by annual revenue, analytics stats, rankings, etc. If the site fails, the less-valuable site would be cheaper to buy than if it was contracted from the getgo.

Very valid point. However I got the impression that there wasn't a lot of revenue coming in on these sites unless there was AdSense running, which I wasn't sure if there was. In other words the site's "success" so to speak was its ranking and traffic and while I can certainly appreciate paying a premium for something like that if I didn't want to spend the time doing it myself I look at this as someone who *would* spend the time and would shoulder the risk as you said, but I guess that is what makes the market go round is there are people out that won't do this and want a finished ready to roll successful site.

jaiganeshv




msg:3989105
 10:28 am on Sep 14, 2009 (gmt 0)

I would say, at this point of economy, this is not the best time for some big buys/sells happen in domain industry.. I had some good domains that were sold only for REG. Being optimistic, i would advise to look for development and focus on quality content, instead of having a landing page flooded with ads...

usedagain




msg:4000612
 8:56 pm on Oct 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

I build a few websites, none of which I am expert on their topics but each of which I have a unique relationship to - and each one I acquired differently - essentially good bargains. I don't know anything about flipping, I enjoy making the cash and building the sites themselves but since I am new I am focused on maxing out the potential before selling.

Someone approached me with an offer based on current quarterly revenue on one site and I told him I wasn't interested unless he was making an offer based on my easily achieved future quarterly revenue. For some this would seem ridiculous but for me it just seemed natural. I have put time in and it will pay off in the future. Right now is just a transitional phase.

I am very impressed by some of the comments here. Some of you should get paid per word.

EmilyLiu




msg:4001866
 2:45 am on Oct 6, 2009 (gmt 0)

sounds a good idea.

jaiganeshv




msg:4013423
 10:12 am on Oct 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

@Jane_Doe
I would advise you to keep a tab on the market prices for all your sites, even though you actually are not willing to sell them. This may confirm that you are in the right direction.
Abt me, I have few sites, planning to boost the traffic and if i get a good deal on them, i may flip it and move with the next ones.

Thank you!

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