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RSS feed
what is and how it works?
specter




msg:3455254
 6:52 pm on Sep 19, 2007 (gmt 0)

Thanks.:-)

 

Marshall




msg:3455266
 7:07 pm on Sep 19, 2007 (gmt 0)

Wikipedia RSS [en.wikipedia.org]

In short, it provides update information about your site, using an XML file, which people can subscribe to.

Marshall

mattur




msg:3455269
 7:13 pm on Sep 19, 2007 (gmt 0)

There's lots of information here [google.com] :)

specter




msg:3455285
 7:27 pm on Sep 19, 2007 (gmt 0)

Thanks guys!

jtara




msg:3455537
 1:24 am on Sep 20, 2007 (gmt 0)

"Feed" is really a poor choice of words. That implies some sort of "push" technology. Couldn't be further from the truth.

An RSS feed is nothing more than a specific URL on your site for each "feed" when returns a specially-formatted XML document. That XML document contains a URL and summary information for each item/article/document/whatever in the feed.

An RSS reader running on your PC periodically polls all of the RSS feeds you've "subscribed" to. (Ohoh! Another poor choice of words!) When you "subscribe" to a feed, you're (surprise, surprise!) not doing anything of the kind! There's no "subscription list" at the website of who has subscribed.

You're just adding an entry to the configuration of your RSS client telling it "here's another "feed" I want you to periodically poll.

The RSS client sucks-down each "feed" now and again and presents it to you in a nicely-formatted list.

That's it.

People insist on complicating the whole thing by introducing all sorts of online services that get in the middle of the process in all sorts of different ways. All unnecessary, IMO, unless you are on the road a lot, and need to access your "subscriptions" from anywhere.

specter




msg:3456505
 9:41 pm on Sep 20, 2007 (gmt 0)

well,

I heard about some webmasters who link their sites dynamically via rss feed; I was wondering how this exactly works as I could be interested in for my own site...
How my contents could appear on another site? on a dedicated page, something similar?

jtara




msg:3456528
 9:55 pm on Sep 20, 2007 (gmt 0)

How my contents could appear on another site? on a dedicated page, something similar?

Any way they'd like. It's up to them to place the content within their site. Could be dedicated pages, could be a "box" on a page with other stuff, etc.

The other sites are just downloading links (and/or content) from your site to theirs. The RSS "feed" simply provides a convenient way for you to tell these sites "what's new" in an organized manner, so that they know what they've already downloaded and what they haven't.

In most cases, it's just the links and summaries that will be presented, and users will be taken to your site to read the full article. Or, the articles might be placed in a frame within their site.

Before RSS "feeds", there was an informal "protocol" for doing the same thing. A site's "what's new" section.

jtara




msg:3456641
 12:57 am on Sep 21, 2007 (gmt 0)

One more take on it to try to demystify RSS.

RSS is nothing more than a specification for XML files that you put on your site - one file per "feed".

Each file lists the URLs of content on your site that is somehow related.

For each URL, the file has the URL, title, the last time the content was updated, etc.

While there are a few more picky details, that's about all there is to it.

- How the these files are created and updated is entirely up to you. Use your imagination.

You could update them by hand, with a text editor if you wish. If you're following Brett's advice to add one page a day to your site, you can see that it would be entirely reasonable to update both your content and RSS feeds using a text editor and FTP.

- How these files are used is entirely up to your users. There are many RSS Readers that your users might install that will automate periodic retrieval of feeds the user is interested in, and present them in various pretty ways. There are numerous online services that will do the same thing - or send them to you as an email, text message, or even read them to you by voice over the phone. Again, use your imagination.

It's really nothing more than a fancy (somewhat) standardized "what's new/what's updated" list.

specter




msg:3456862
 10:53 am on Sep 21, 2007 (gmt 0)

Thanks for your kind explaination Jt.

There are many RSS Readers that your users might install that will automate periodic retrieval of feeds the user is interested in, and present them in various pretty ways.

Does some browser, such as Opera come with such a built-in feature?

jtara




msg:3457244
 3:16 pm on Sep 21, 2007 (gmt 0)

Does some browser, such as Opera come with such a built-in feature?

Firefox 2.0. Don't know about others. Firefox calls this feature "live bookmarks".

I prefer a standalone product, though. I use that "demon" package. Unfortunately, they got bought by one of those "man in the middle" services, and they've been persistently adding features to steer you in that direction.

specter




msg:3457326
 4:36 pm on Sep 21, 2007 (gmt 0)

and to call that "feeds" on my site?

jtara




msg:3457377
 5:29 pm on Sep 21, 2007 (gmt 0)

and to call that "feeds" on my site?

?

specter




msg:3457638
 10:39 pm on Sep 21, 2007 (gmt 0)

Assuming I have a site and I would receive those feeds directly on my home page...

jtara




msg:3457647
 10:58 pm on Sep 21, 2007 (gmt 0)

Assuming I have a site and I would receive those feeds directly on my home page...

Well, first you should check with the other site to make sure that they permit this type of usage.

Then, you will need to install software on your server that will periodically download the feeds, and format them into HTML in some pretty way.

Again, there's no magic to this. A feed is nothing but an XML file accessible through a web server. That is it. What you do with that file is limited to your imagination.

specter




msg:3457654
 11:07 pm on Sep 21, 2007 (gmt 0)

thank you jt.

You was very "explanatory" for me.

thanks a lot! :-)

dcheney




msg:3457655
 11:14 pm on Sep 21, 2007 (gmt 0)

Does some browser, such as Opera come with such a built-in feature?

Yes, Opera has that feature.

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