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What's needed to shoot and save as RM or AVI
As it looks I am not a specialist :)
henry0




msg:3494061
 9:25 pm on Nov 1, 2007 (gmt 0)

I have a client that wants to show a video from her site .
I can use on my dedicated server either a .RM or .AVI file format

So the question is what is needed to shoot and obtain a video format with an extension of .RM or AVI

Which kind of software does she need to install on her local machine?

 

Demaestro




msg:3494099
 10:03 pm on Nov 1, 2007 (gmt 0)

I know that Adobe Premiere will output the .avi format but that is an expensive piece of software.

If she has a windows box there is Windows Movie maker... you can check what formats it outputs... Comes on most Xp boxes installed.

jtara




msg:3494185
 12:02 am on Nov 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

I can use on my dedicated server either a .RM or .AVI file format

You can use any format you want. Servers don't care

I'm not sure that I would particularly recommend either of these formats right now, though - but without further details, it's hard to say what format would be best for your users.

RealMedia has rapidly lost popularity. AVI limits you to Windows users. FLV seems the hot web video format right now, driven initially by YouTube, but subsequently by it's rapid ascent to ubiquity.

So the question is what is needed to shoot and obtain a video format with an extension of .RM or AVI

You wouldn't shoot in either of these. Most common and practical these days would be DV, which is available in a wide range of cameras from inexpensive consumer models to semi-professional cameras used in low-end news gathering. DV is transferred to your computer over FireWire, and then you can convert to a target format.

The Wikipedia article provides a good introduction to DV:

[en.wikipedia.org...]

I certainly wouldn't recommend today shooting in analog and then transferring to your computer through a capture card. That's old-hat, poor quality, and painful.

There are a large number of tools for converting between video formats. A popular free, open-source one is ffmpeg.

You will probably have to do some video editing along the way. For best quality, it would be good to edit in DV or in some format that is able to preserve the quality of the original. As a rule, formats that do inter-frame compression (DV does not) are not a great choice for editing. Although widely-used, MPEG (2 and 4) is really a poor choice for editing, though it can be a decent format for delivery.

There are quite a number of consumer cameras today that shoot in MPEG4, but I would avoid them for the reasons stated above. If quality matters, shoot in DV.

The advantage of MPEG4 cameras is that they compress sufficiently that most/all use solid-state storage, resulting in a more compact camera. Most/all DV cameras use a tape (which records in a digital format). As far as I know, all DV cameras include a firewire interface that you can use to transfer to your computer.

Bring plenty of disk space.

henry0




msg:3494488
 11:02 am on Nov 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

jtara,
Thank you very much for taking time to post such a bundle of valuable info.

Now I have a better view on how to perform.
Henry

<edit>
I can use on my dedicated server either a .RM or .AVI file format

What it means is that those tools are already installed
</edit>

jtara




msg:3494805
 5:07 pm on Nov 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

I can use on my dedicated server either a .RM or .AVI file format

What it means is that those tools are already installed

But there aren't any tools that need to be installed to serve either of these, or any other video format.

Not sure what it is that you have installed.

There are video servers for live streaming, but live streaming certainly isn't necessary to serve video files. They're needed if you are going to feed a live stream from a webcam, or if you want your users to be able to skip to the middle of a video without having to download the whole thing.

I'd be surprised, though, if your server came pre-installed with such servers, as they tend to be rather expensive, and hosts generally charge extra for this.

henry0




msg:3494820
 5:20 pm on Nov 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

I have Darwin Stream Server
and RM
But as mentioned I never used any of the above :)

thecoalman




msg:3515032
 4:53 am on Nov 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

AVI is not a format but a wrapper that can contain any type of video. Playback is dependent on whether the user has the correct codec installed.

Most/all DV cameras use a tape (which records in a digital format). As far as I know, all DV cameras include a firewire interface that you can use to transfer to your computer.

They all use tape except for some very expensive (as in you can purchase a house for the same price) professional cams. One thing to note is the MPEG4 video produced by still cams is in no way a comparison to DV video, it's not even close. Nice feature but not practical for anything professional or even home video where the event is important. They use non-standard resolutions and in some cases non-standard framrates. For those using non-standard frmaerates it makes the video almost useless except for video on your computer.

While on the subject do yourself a favor and keep right on walking when you see a DVD cam, tape is superior to them as well.

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