Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.227.48.147

Forum Moderators: bakedjake

Message Too Old, No Replies

WiGig Super-Fast Wireless Certified By WiFi Alliance

the 802.11ad standard

     
1:22 pm on Oct 25, 2016 (gmt 0)

Administrator from GB 

WebmasterWorld Administrator engine is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month Best Post Of The Month

joined:May 9, 2000
posts:25033
votes: 658


That super-fast wireless technology based upon the 802.11ad standard, dubbed WiGig, has been certified by the WiFi Alliance and now means that 60Ghz spectrum can be used for gigabit performance technology, such as in VR, multimedia, and gaming.
“Wi-Fi Alliance certification has a strong history of accelerating broad technology adoption across the industry, and we expect 2017 to be a breakout year for WiGig on the heels of Wi-Fi CERTIFIED program availability,” said Phil Solis, Research Director, ABI Research. “The ecosystem for WiGig spans the mobile, PC, and consumer electronics industries across the consumer, enterprise, and service provider markets. Devices will leverage the brand and ubiquity of Wi-Fi for continued momentum across these industries.” WiGig Super-Fast Wireless Certified By WiFi Alliance [wi-fi.org]
1:52 am on Oct 26, 2016 (gmt 0)

Administrator from JP 

WebmasterWorld Administrator bill is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month Best Post Of The Month

joined:Oct 12, 2000
posts:15039
votes: 139


[en.wikipedia.org...]
In the United States, the band 38.6 – 40.0 GHz is used for licensed high-speed microwave data links, and the 60 GHz band can be used for unlicensed short range (1.7 km) data links with data throughputs up to 2.5 Gbit/s. It is used commonly in flat terrain.


Interesting. They can get some serious distance in this millimeter band. I guess we'll have to wait a bit before there's any equipment that can handle this sort of broadcast and reception.
8:02 am on Oct 26, 2016 (gmt 0)

Administrator from GB 

WebmasterWorld Administrator engine is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month Best Post Of The Month

joined:May 9, 2000
posts:25033
votes: 658


Yeah. 1.7km is using a directional antenna. I suspect this will be used for high data throughput applications. Your average laptop is unlikely to need this, however, with VR I can see the applications.

I'm sure it's only very low power, and i'm sure they've tested it, however, i'd be concerned about the safety aspect of this frequency in use.
10:07 pm on Oct 26, 2016 (gmt 0)

Moderator from US 

WebmasterWorld Administrator keyplyr is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Sept 26, 2001
posts:10624
votes: 630


Qualcomm (down the street from me) being proactive: [forbes.com...]

And 5k for mobile: [pcmag.com...]
8:34 am on Oct 27, 2016 (gmt 0)

Senior Member from KZ 

WebmasterWorld Senior Member lammert is a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month

joined:Jan 10, 2005
posts: 2938
votes: 24


This will in practice only work if there is a free line of sight between the sender and receiver. The ability of waves to bend around objects is dependent on the ratio between the wave length and object size. With a wave length of 5 mm and buildings and furniture much larger than that there will be no noticeable diffraction.

Long distances will never be reached in the 60 GHz band. Reason is that Oxygen has a high absorption for frequencies in this range. Actually this seems to be the important reason 60 GHz is now used as a near-distance communication band because air effectively filters interference and therefore allows for high density antenna networks. See also [rfglobalnet.com...] Figure 2 is especially interesting because it shows that 60 GHz is the optimum for high density antenna grids.