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Amazon, Apple, Google, HP, Microsoft and RIM Agree To Improve Privacy In Mobile Apps
engine




msg:4420815
 10:07 am on Feb 23, 2012 (gmt 0)

Amazon, Apple, Google, HP, Microsoft and RIM Agree To Improve Privacy In Mobile Apps [oag.ca.gov]
Attorney General Kamala D. Harris today announced an agreement committing the leading operators of mobile application platforms to improve privacy protections for millions of consumers around the globe who access the Internet through applications ("apps") on their smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices.

Attorney General Harris forged the agreement with six companies whose platforms comprise the majority of the mobile apps market: Amazon, Apple, Google, Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft and Research In Motion. These platforms have agreed to privacy principles designed to bring the industry in line with a California law requiring mobile apps that collect personal information to have a privacy policy. The majority of mobile apps sold today do not contain a privacy policy.

"Your personal privacy should not be the cost of using mobile apps, but all too often it is," said Attorney General Harris.

 

lexipixel




msg:4420943
 4:29 pm on Feb 23, 2012 (gmt 0)

These platforms have agreed to privacy principles designed to bring the industry in line with a California law requiring mobile apps that collect personal information to have a privacy policy


Here's the (US) White House's (60) page white paper it's based on: [whitehouse.gov...]

Most likely, what we'll end up with is 12k apps with 30k privacy policies, (that most average user will never read, and won't be able to understand if they do).

The trend in "privacy policies" is to write lengthy documents full of so much legaleses that impatient users just check off the "[X] I have read and understand this" to get past that part of the software setup.

travelin cat




msg:4420951
 4:42 pm on Feb 23, 2012 (gmt 0)

I'm sure there is no data on the percentage of people that actually read privacy policies, but I would venture to guess it is less than 10%.

Even if I did read every pp, would it deter me from using the goods or service? Probably not unless there was some non-legalese warning in large bold letters stating that something horrible would happen to me when using said goods or service.

Marshall




msg:4420955
 5:02 pm on Feb 23, 2012 (gmt 0)

My biggest complaint with these privacy policies is not the length or legalese, but the fact you cannot opt out. This especially annoys me when I pay for something.

I can opt out of pre-screened offers through my credit report, unsolicited phone calls, having my information sold on a mailing list when I subscribe to a magazine, newspaper or other periodical, but you cannot opt out of online services.

My take on it: if it is a free service, then you have to play by their rules as the price you pay for free. But if I am paying for it, then an opt out feature should be required. That, in itself, would solve a lot of privacy issues. Me buying your product does not give you the right to use my information for all eternity, especially if you are making money off of its use.

Marshall

Gibble




msg:4420960
 5:09 pm on Feb 23, 2012 (gmt 0)

...but I would venture to guess it is less than 10%.


I would venture it's far far far far far far lower than that.

lexipixel




msg:4421005
 6:15 pm on Feb 23, 2012 (gmt 0)

Me buying your product does not give you the right to use my information for all eternity, especially if you are making money off of its use.


It's well beyond the internet. If you use a grocery store loyalty discount card, they literally know how much and what brand of TP you use.

I would venture it's far far far far far far lower than that.


I just checked one of my sites, +26,000 uniques, +80,000 page views, 148 views of privacy policy page. I don't have a way of knowing how many actually read it (or how many just ended up on that page from a SERP that matched a word or phrase in the privacy policy which also includes information under titles like: "How to Correct Inaccuracies", "Log files" and "Links").

Still 148 views out of 26k uniques is approximately 0.5%, (half a percent).

Admittedly, that number is different from "software signup" (forced) reads of privacay policies -- but I'm sure the numbers aren't much higher for people who actually read the policies.

Anyone with an ecommerce site that has an "I have read and understand" (privacy/shipping/returns policy) check box can probably get an idea of how many people actually read things compared to how many check the box saying they did...

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