homepage Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.204.67.26
register, free tools, login, search, subscribe, help, library, announcements, recent posts, open posts,
Accredited PayPal World Seller

Visit PubCon.com
Home / Forums Index / Microsoft / (deprecated) Microsoft Windows OS (XP/NT/Vista)
Forum Library, Charter, Moderators: bill

(deprecated) Microsoft Windows OS (XP/NT/Vista) Forum

This 36 message thread spans 2 pages: 36 ( [1] 2 > >     
Dell Warns Customers About Vista Complications
tedster




msg:3387789
 3:24 pm on Jul 6, 2007 (gmt 0)

After a brief period of selling only Vista, Dell was forced to bring back Windows XP, since there remained a lot of demand for the old system. Now Dell is going even farther, as it's warning business customers about the difficult challenges that lay ahead of them if they decide to adopt Vista.

TechDirt article [techdirt.com]

Dell is "stepping back" from telling people they must upgrade. "We are set up to give people all the guidance and support they need for this...We are not here to promote Microsoft and tell people they should buy it."

ZDNet article [news.zdnet.co.uk]


 

kiwibrit




msg:3388051
 8:36 pm on Jul 6, 2007 (gmt 0)

Good story. But I can't find any original Dell output to back it up.

tedster




msg:3388469
 5:44 pm on Jul 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

The Dell US website has an "Essential Links" section in the left panel with one choice that says "Still looking for Windows XP?" The target page of that link makes it clear to the buyer that they can still buy XP from Dell on their new computer.

Here's another story (there's lots of them out there now) that covers the fact that this is widespread among VARs (Value Added Resellers), and not just a Dell phenomenon.

VARs Ripping And Replacing Vista For XP At Breakneck Pace [crn.com]

maximillianos




msg:3388474
 6:01 pm on Jul 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

Good for Dell... Consumers should not be railroaded into Vista. A choice is always good!

I recently bought a brand new Thinkpad laptop from Lenovo. They offered both XP Pro and Vista. I opted for XP Pro since I knew it would fly on my new laptop, and all my software would work.

Too many unknowns right now with Vista. Maybe in a few more years after all the performance issues are worked out.

Way to go Dell! Now if you can only bring your consumer customer service BACK into the USA!

ogletree




msg:3388527
 7:30 pm on Jul 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

MS should not have released an OS that would not run well on the most common new computer set ups. They released a version that requires a high end system.

celgins




msg:3388558
 8:59 pm on Jul 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

A month ago, two friends asked me if I thought Windows Vista was "okay" to order preloaded on new laptops. I recommended against it.

Even though tedster mentioned the "Essential Links" link on the Dell U.S. site, I don't think most users will see this. I walked through the process of building a laptop and Windows Vista is still the only OS you can choose.

ByronM




msg:3388559
 8:59 pm on Jul 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

Funny.. I run vista quite nice on a sub 400.00 system. (or about 450.00 with an ultimate Vista license)

I built a:

AMD X2 3600 ($36.00)
2 Gigs Ram (80.00)
250 Gig Sata HDD (49.00)
Geforce 8600GT (99.00 after rebates)
Case/Power Suplly (55.00)
DVDROM (29.00)
S&H From new Egg - 20 bucks.

That system screams with vista, has DX10 support, is rated over 5 across the board and has absolutely no problems running Office 2007, IE, Opera, Mozilla, Oracle Financials, Oracle Developer, Visual Studio, Photoshop, Premier and everything else i run or my wife runs on her system.

The problem with Vista isn't computational resources, its companies like Dell still pushing antiquated hardware as if its the deal of the century and people complaining and blaming vista because its slow.

YES, shared video is slow. Its slow on XP as well. Yes, 4800RPM whitebox drives are slow - sata is better. Yes Chrome/Intel 960 chipsets are slow - they're slow on XP/Linux or any OS for that matter.

You hardly realize the penalty of PC resources until you throw a real application at it. Vista does requiremore headroom than XP, but ram almost singularly fixes that. A slow dell running XP may feel snappier if all you ever do is click the start bar, but if you run any applications, games, multimedia a slow dell is still a slow dell irregardly os the OS.

rehabguy




msg:3388591
 10:26 pm on Jul 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

My business partner had to send his Dell with Vista machine back for one with XP because Microsoft Office 2003 wouldn't run on it, and it was extremely slow, even with 2GB of RAM and the best dual-core processor. So we've experienced this Dell problem first hand.

celgins




msg:3388612
 11:06 pm on Jul 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

The problem with Vista isn't computational resources, its companies like Dell still pushing antiquated hardware as if its the deal of the century and people complaining and blaming vista because its slow.

I don't think Dell's hardware is the issue.

... and has absolutely no problems running Office 2007, IE, Opera, Mozilla, Oracle Financials, Oracle Developer, Visual Studio, Photoshop, Premier

Maybe, but most people don't use Opera, Mozilla, Oracle products, VS, Photoshop, or Premier. Even more important, not everyone has Office 2007 and still run Office XP on personal and work computers.

When I tried to install certain software applications on Vista (i.e. Norton Antivirus), it choked and almost every tech forum on the web has people screaming about Vista's inability to support older applications (including some of Microsoft's own).

maximillianos




msg:3388635
 12:05 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

For me, I don't care for the new flashy 3D stuff... and apparently it hogs the memory (like 1 GB even while you are idle!). That is just crazy to me.

Plus XP just works so well and fast on old and new machines... what motivation do we have to upgrade? They may take away support... but who really uses those automatic updates anyway... for me, they seem to always break more than they patch anyway... =)

ByronM




msg:3388671
 1:59 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)


Maybe, but most people don't use Opera, Mozilla, Oracle products, VS, Photoshop, or Premier. Even more important, not everyone has Office 2007 and still run Office XP on personal and work computers.

Huh? Photoshop, Firefox, Oracle Products, Office 2007 or any office version for that matter are all highly used by hundreds of millions of people. Probably the most used apps on any platform.


When I tried to install certain software applications on Vista (i.e. Norton Antivirus), it choked and almost every tech forum on the web has people screaming about Vista's inability to support older applications (including some of Microsoft's own).

Norton Antivirus is terrible to begin with. I wouldn't touch it with a 10 foot pole because it was the same issue going from 95 to 98 to ME to 2000 to XP and to Vista.

I find it very amusing people say the same thing year in year out with every upgrade. "I don't want XP because the new interface.." "I don't want Vista because the new interface"..

I'd say vista has been the LEAST hassle of ANY of i've EVER upgrade and i've been in the industry before the days of DOS. Vista worked out of the box with every PC and laptop i've upgraded. Installing XP on modern hardware is like pulling teeth. (SATA anyone? and yes, i've slipstreamed my own release to get it to work, but we're talking about average pc users here).

Thats not to say it doesn't have its share of problems. It is a memory hog, but so are lots of OS's.

My fav back in the day was OS/2, but it was the same beef back then. (needs 16 megs of memory to run good man!)

celgins




msg:3388674
 2:08 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

Huh? Photoshop, Firefox, Oracle Products, Office 2007 or any office version for that matter are all highly used by hundreds of millions of people. Probably the most used apps on any platform.

Your average home user doesn't shell out $650 for Photoshop. It is used mostly by businesses, web developers, designers, etc.; despite the movement, IE is still more widely used than Firefox; probably 95% of average home users don't even know what "Oracle" is; and users who currently have Office XP probably haven't spent $$$ to install Office 2007. So I'm not sure where your "hundreds of millions" of people stat comes from.

Norton Antivirus is terrible to begin with. I wouldn't touch it with a 10 foot pole because it was the same issue going from 95 to 98 to ME to 2000 to XP and to Vista.

Whether you or I think Norton Antivirus is a great application or not, still doesn't resolve the issues Vista has recognizing it. Unlike those other software applications mentioned above, Norton Antivirus (and McAfee) are cheap enough for the average home user to purchase. Therefore, many folks have these applications already.

Wlauzon




msg:3388690
 2:43 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

The problem with Vista isn't computational resources, its companies like Dell still pushing antiquated hardware as if its the deal of the century and people complaining and blaming vista because its slow.

That is absolute baloney. I don't really think that Core 2 2.8 mhz is all that antiquated.

I have two systems, one Dell and one HP, both about the same or higher than what you have. And Vista quite often just "pauses" for no apparent reason for 10 seconds to a couple of minutes.

And Vista crashes continually, often for no reason at all just at random.

Some of the problem I am sure has to do with some 3rd party software, and/or all Adobe products - in Vista Acrobat Professional 8.1 will sometimes lock up for 1-4 minutes and then start again.

But I have had Vista on BOTH of my machines just randomly reboot while doing nothing not long after a restart - with no programs but the usual startup programs running.

And if Vista upgrades are so wonderfully easy, then why did I have to reinstall all of my MS Expression software because Vista broke it?

[edited by: Wlauzon at 2:46 am (utc) on July 8, 2007]

ByronM




msg:3388718
 3:35 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)


That is absolute baloney. I don't really think that Core 2 2.8 mhz is all that antiquated.

2.8ghz? I have one of those (not a dell) and it screams with Vista. Infact i run at 1920x1080 and use it to power a media center, DLP projector and 2 xbox 360s and i barely cause it to burp.


I have two systems, one Dell and one HP, both about the same or higher than what you have. And Vista quite often just "pauses" for no apparent reason for 10 seconds to a couple of minutes.

Are they a laptop or desktop? Are they shared memory systems or do you have at least a real geforce 2go or radeon chipset video card? Are they 4800 RPM drives or at least 5200?

When does it pause? I can use keyboard shortcuts all day long in vista and never a pause.


And Vista crashes continually, often for no reason at all just at random.

Sounds like hardware problems. I have 5 systems running vista at home and the only time i've managed to crash one of them was upgrading my video card.


Some of the problem I am sure has to do with some 3rd party software, and/or all Adobe products - in Vista Acrobat Professional 8.1 will sometimes lock up for 1-4 minutes and then start again.

I agree.. adobe has been terribly slow to fix vista issues - but is that a fault of vista? the rest of the suite works well. Acrobat is terrible and foxit has better products. I don't think its a design issue of vista but a lack of product control from adobe.


But I have had Vista on BOTH of my machines just randomly reboot while doing nothing not long after a restart - with no programs but the usual startup programs running.

ahh.. the random reboots. Just goes to show the quality of HP and dell systems is garbage. If it randomly reboots in vista, i'm sure it does the same in XP - just quicker i guess.


And if Vista upgrades are so wonderfully easy, then why did I have to reinstall all of my MS Expression software because Vista broke it?

I dunno.. who said anything about them being wonderfully easy, i just said it was 10x easier than previous upgrades.

I never "upgrade" the os, i always do a fresh install and everything i run works.

ByronM




msg:3388724
 3:44 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

Your average home user doesn't shell out $650 for Photoshop. It is used mostly by businesses, web developers, designers, etc.; despite the movement, IE is still more widely used than Firefox; probably 95% of average home users don't even know what "Oracle" is; and users who currently have Office XP probably haven't spent $$$ to install Office 2007. So I'm not sure where your "hundreds of millions" of people stat comes from.

Isn't it sort of obvious that IE works? I mean it comes with Vista, no reason to spell it out.

The hundreds of million stats were in regard to business applications currently used since people thought my list was too narrow or not "consumer" enough.

Last time i checked most people who buy a PC are going to load up software on it or buy it with the software in place.


Whether you or I think Norton Antivirus is a great application or not, still doesn't resolve the issues Vista has recognizing it. Unlike those other software applications mentioned above, Norton Antivirus (and McAfee) are cheap enough for the average home user to purchase. Therefore, many folks have these applications already.

Its not a fault of Vista that Norton and McAfee choose to ignore functionality or even application availability for vista.

Nortons business products are ok, but the rest are garbage. These products spam you, require expensive subscriptions, slow down, crash, create instability and generally degrade your computer irregardless of running vista or not. They're garbage on XP and garbage on vista. Hardly a fault of MS.

kaled




msg:3388790
 9:45 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

My own experience is that Vista works, but some ludicrous decisions were taken some big some small. Like many around the world MS engineers seem to think change=improvement - WRONG.

1) Graphics hardware. So far as I can tell, if you ditched the glowing title-bar buttons (and possibly shading effects) it could run on typical XP hardware - even the glass effects.

2) Where's the parent-folder button on open/save dialogs?

3) Menus are no longer at the top of the window - why?

And then there are bugs that betray the fact that the code (which is supposed to be mostly new) is perhaps even dirtier than the old stuff. Did you know, for instance, that (if glass is active) the position and size of fixed-size windows is reported wrongly making accurate programatic positioning impossible - the only way around this bug is to use resizable windows and then make it impossible to resize them by overriding message handlers. How on earth do bugs like that get into a release version?

Kaled.

Calculus




msg:3388791
 10:17 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

I bought a Vista machine, then a few months later had to by another PC and was so glad when I saw that Dell was still offering XP.

The crap that MSFT puts out is amazing. Can't wait for the day when machines have virtual OS and all we need is a cheap terminal to access all our files and programs.

Can you imagine how big Google might become if they can accomplish the above?

night707




msg:3388809
 11:19 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

My systems do professional productions of music, videos, dvds, websites, photos. I had a close check on xp on my machines, a good look at other folks pc and still prefer W2k.

All software runs fine, a complete installation with all tuning takes about a day and i dread the day, when some application might force me me into xp or vista.

W2k incl. all service packs fit on one little cd and it had been a pretty good product.

vincevincevince




msg:3388820
 11:41 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

I recently had to recommend a Dell Vista PC be reformatted and installed with XP just a week after it was shipped. Reason being that it wouldn't support important software packages.

shigamoto




msg:3388830
 11:48 am on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

I think the whole Vista problems issue has several variables.

1) Some hardware manufacturers knowing that a new version of Windows will be released well in advance did nothing to develop new drivers for Vista. So people had problems with their Ipods, printers, video cards and what not.

Of course the hardware companies didn't want to release new updated drivers for Vista since they are making nothing to provide drivers for the operating system and would rather have their customers buy new hardware.

2) I would like to counter the popular belief that Vista requires a high-end system. I have used Vista for several months on what I would consider a low-end system, obviously I can not use stuff like Dreamscene and Aero but it runs fine as a basic operating system and I see no difference from if I would have used XP.

3) The real problems with Vista has been the software. Adobe also knew that Vista would be released and could have prepared in advance, but they did not. Apple also knew that Vista would be released and could have fixed Itunes in advance, they did nothing.

The only software I have had real problems with using Vista is ZoneAlarm and Itunes. Most other stuff worked fine but then I don't run much older software.

4) Every release of Windows had its share of problems. When 95 came some software didn't work and a lot of hardware were renedered useless (I remember giving away my trusty monochrome hand scanner:).

Now all my systems run Vista (three computers) except for one. I can't say that the difference is that dramatic from XP. It's a little bit more flashy, includes a faster search engine and a little bit different start-menu. Yes there are a lot of software included some of it useless (BitLocker which slows down the system badly) and some useful (Sidebar, Aero and Backup).

The most annoying feature in Vista so far is the User Access Control, it's a security feature I know but I turned it off since it pop-ups just about everytime you do something. I think Microsoft could have integrated it better.

Making a decision about upgrading should be based on what hardware and software you are running. If you know that your printer won't work and some software then don't upgrade. You will not miss much now but you probably will later.

All problems in Vista is not solely Microsoft's fault, there are other culprits as well; Adobe, Apple and a bunch of hardware makers.

justageek




msg:3388865
 1:40 pm on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

My $0.02.

I've had Vista since it was a beta and it has been just fine. I found anything that did not run on it in the beginning slowly began to work as the 3rd party software providers released updated software. Sure MS had their set of issues but most issues were related to other folks not supporting Vista not the other way around.

Most people forget, or don't realize, that an awful lot of work goes into the MS OS's to get them to work on all the possible combinations of hardware configurations out there. Dell should have sent a team to sit down with the folks at Apple so the Apple folks could tell them 'just like us you only have to support the hardware you produce so make sure it works BEFORE you start selling those systems'. MS enbles companies like Dell to exist so you'd think they would be on top of this from day one.

I wish I had some real world experience with a Dell machine not working so I could talk about it but I haven't experienced it yet. I've not had any problems whatsoever with Dell, not even with the latest 64 bit beta Longhorn server running on several Dell machines. In fact, I have never had easier installs than with Vista and Longhorn. Longhorn takes me about 30 minutes to get fresh install and have the machine in service including all the other software I need.

JAG

Wlauzon




msg:3388912
 4:26 pm on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

I never "upgrade" the os, i always do a fresh install and everything i run works....

That is not always an option unless you really want to reinstall 20-30 programs, redo all your settings for emails, logons, etc etc. - meanwhile hoping that you can find all the CD's, keys, license info. I just did all that 3-4 months ago when I got the new machines, and am just not mentall prepared to do it all again.

What is odd is that sometimes it will run for hours with no problems at all.

And I have seen some other strange things - like one program I want to uninstall shows up under my normal user logon, but says I need admin access to remove it. But if I log on as Admin, the program appears not to exist on the computer at all.

But as someone noted, I so far have seen no big advantage to upgrading. A lot of what is new seems to be a bit "fluffy" - prettier, glitzier, but not any more functional. The "new" email program I think is a step backwards - and appears to be part of the crashing problems.

So while it may be true that much of the problem is really 3rd party stuff, it is more fun to blame MS.

[edited by: Wlauzon at 4:32 pm (utc) on July 8, 2007]

Essex_boy




msg:3389004
 7:22 pm on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

Ive jsut bought amachine installed with this, it crashes 3 times a day on average.

Makes me think back to my Sinclair days and the wobbly RAM packs.....

ByronM




msg:3389011
 7:38 pm on Jul 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

It is a lot of work to re-install, but we're talking about new PC's here anyway, so a re-install is just the fact of buying a new pc.

Dell often images the PC's with so much crap there are 20 things running, alerting you they're expiring and need registration and won't un-install correctly and so on and so forth that if you have the media, re-install and do it your way to begin with.

As for me, i like vista because i use the new features extensively. I couldn't live without Media Center, i like the drive encryption for my laptops (got rid of cludgy addons to do the same), the maintenance system is 2nd to none (performance logs, metrics, utilization, error reporting), application compatibility for an SP0 is astounding and it handles a load really well.

If i buy a modern computer, i tend to turn on the bells and whistles. Its like car shopping, why buy a lexus if you aren't going to enjoy heated seats, windows sensitive to pressure changes, climate control, GPS, automatic parking and what not. Sure the car is still a car, but you sure as hell enjoy the tweaks they put into it.

There is a lot "under the hood" that most people won't recognize until well into the acceptance of vista - media center, media sharing and media networks being one of them.

growing pains, of course.. but any long term PC user knows who to trust and what not to do.

UAC is a moot point since its terribly easy to disable (as well as disable the alerts about it). I'ms ure UAC will be tweaked even further with SP1.

the biggest annoyance is some of the networking options/menus & organization - 3 deep to get to where i want but oh well, i use it once in a blue moon to debug ISP/wireless issues and on the flipside on my laptops wireless roaming and networking seems to work flawlessly unlike the hacks in XP.

Vista is more than a pretty face.

vincevincevince




msg:3389154
 12:33 am on Jul 9, 2007 (gmt 0)

ByronM - I'd love to see a new thread entitled "benefits of Vista explained" - you briefly mention some benefits in your post but to be honest I've no idea what the feature-titles mean. Nothing I've seen, even from Microsoft, has told me of the good reasons why I should run Vista. Is media sharing different to file sharing, and are media networks different to networks? And, what is a Media Center?

unreviewed




msg:3389231
 4:36 am on Jul 9, 2007 (gmt 0)

I’m still working in XP, but duel boot to Vista as I slowly build it up to a reliable OS and one that I can understand.

Undated my cheap Realtek driver from Windows Update 2 days ago and immediately had incredibly slow private networking and it was corrupting Microsoft Access database files when accessed over the private wire. “ouch” Good thing I keep good backups. The solution was to rollback the driver.

Another problem was installing a network printer. During installation Vista would complain that its print spooler died and needed to be restarted. The solution was to open Services, located the Print Spooler, stop and restart. Continue to install your network printer. The printer install will again complain that the Print Spooler has died and you will again need to stop and restart the spooler system. You’ll need to do this about 3 or 4 times until it will install your HP 1020 network printer.

Now If I could figure out a way to get Winfax 10.03 working, I might start to think of Vista as more than a hobby.

ByronM




msg:3389455
 12:18 pm on Jul 9, 2007 (gmt 0)


ByronM - I'd love to see a new thread entitled "benefits of Vista explained" - you briefly mention some benefits in your post but to be honest I've no idea what the feature-titles mean. Nothing I've seen, even from Microsoft, has told me of the good reasons why I should run Vista. Is media sharing different to file sharing, and are media networks different to networks? And, what is a Media Center?

Windows Media Center is a service in the Home Premium or higher editions of vista that allows you to create a home media network and watch/record live TV from a PC. I run Media Center on one desktop connected to a project in my home theater and i use 2 Xbox 360's as extenders for a tv in the bedroom and living room. The MCE machine has 2 digital tuners and 1 analog tuner so i can record 2 hdtv shows and one analog.. really only have multiple cards because we had conflicts of recording 24 and heroes at the same time. (Cards were only 35 bucks.. so it was a cheap price to pay).

The media services is a lightweight protocol used in WMP11 that allows you to share you videos, recorded tv, music across the network as a standard catalog and WMP11 rated devices can access/play this media as licensed content. So if you have zune marketplace or yahoo music or other subscription services everything can work easily through this framework to allow your network devices licenses up to the legal amount (3 for yahoo).

I don't have Cable TV - just OTA HDTV and Analog tv. I've dumped all my dvd's onto disk and taught my kids how to use a remote/xbox 360 and thats how we watch tv, listen to music, watch movies, look at our family pictures and whatnot.

As far as the Vista features that will impact more people, vista has very fine tuned performance, metrics, benchmarking, alerting and error reporting capabilities. You can pinpoint everything to disk, io, driver, cpu latetncy and use that data to report bugs, change options or point the finger.

I bought a dual core laptop from hp with 2 gigs of ram and it ran vist LIKE A DOG, but after running the tools that came with vista to report the latency & bug issues to HP they've updated the bios, drivers and i removed some of the software causing the issue and now the only slow part is user switching which HP has a fix coming for.

Wireless networking on my laptop is also pretty seemless, i used to run "roaming" systems on xp to be able to easily identify networks but the capability in vista is already there.

Other features i like:

1. Fast install - no farting with device drivers/sata/scsi disks for bootup - supports large HD devices out of the box without having to slipstream my own XP release for each hardware scenerio
2. WIndows MovieMaker - i use firewire from my camcorder to dump all my recording into media center so we can not only have them on tape but watch them on any of our tvs and archive them.
3. Photoviewer/WMP have all been upgraded to support tagging of media. sure, other programs have done this but its integrated across the board.

Favs:
* Windows Search works like a dream
* Windows Media center while still not the best, has come a long way and is being improved independantly of the OS for a change (unlike the locked xp releases)

Oh, another favorite is that audio is now mixed on per application, i can mute IM and still listen to music at standard volume or disable audio on virus alerts (darn talking avast) and so on and so forth.

I also like the fact hovering over the task bar gives you a thumbnail of the application and the thumbnail is an active representation of what is going - so you can see the webpage/app/movie and whatnot and easily tab through.

have any specifics you are looking for?

Easy_Coder




msg:3389654
 4:09 pm on Jul 9, 2007 (gmt 0)

I've got vista running on a dell box and it's never crashed once. It's the fastest box I've got but that has something to do with a 10K RPM drive and 3 GB of memory (I loaded 4GB but it only see's 3GB).

I do have problems with IE 7 crashing though and I'm still not able to get print drivers for my laser printer and those are big hassles for me. My only other software problem is my speech recognition software likes to fireup the StumbleUpon browser window when I say "exclamation mark". I don't think thats vista related though ;)

Personally, I like it but I don't know that I'd recommend it to a neighbor or friend without a warning on older peripherals and the fact that they may not work. To date, all of my programs have installed and ran just fine on vista.

scotland




msg:3390040
 12:07 am on Jul 10, 2007 (gmt 0)

I recently purchased a desktop with Vista installed and I have never seen so many cases of "blue screen of death" as I used to know it - way back in Windows 3.11 days.

I changed my anti-virus software and have not had a problem since.

It has meant that I have had to buy new software thus increasing the cost of upgrading more than I would have wanted. One advantage is that I have also tried out Microsoft Expression web as an alternative to Dreamweaver (as 2004 MX crashes Vista) - I am pretty impressed with Microsoft's new web development software.

I must admitt that I think I still prefer XP Professional and if I had realised the problems involved in not being able to run by existing software I would not have gone Vista.

Wlauzon




msg:3390292
 7:18 am on Jul 10, 2007 (gmt 0)

Windows Media Center is a service in the Home Premium or higher editions of vista that allows you to create a home media network and watch/record live TV from a PC....

I have Vista Business, and I use it for business.

How does all that media bloat do a thing for the business side?

This 36 message thread spans 2 pages: 36 ( [1] 2 > >
Global Options:
 top home search open messages active posts  
 

Home / Forums Index / Microsoft / (deprecated) Microsoft Windows OS (XP/NT/Vista)
rss feed

All trademarks and copyrights held by respective owners. Member comments are owned by the poster.
Terms of Service ¦ Privacy Policy ¦ Report Problem ¦ About
© Webmaster World 1996-2014 all rights reserved