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Vista Gets 'Transfer To New Machine Limits' To Combat Piracy
engine

WebmasterWorld Administrator engine us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month Best Post Of The Month



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 11:50 am on Oct 17, 2006 (gmt 0)

Under changes to Microsoft's licensing terms, buyers of retail copies of Vista will only be able to transfer their software to a new machine once. If they want to move their software a second time, they will have to buy a new copy of the operating system.

In the past, those who bought a retail copy of Windows needed to uninstall it from any machine before moving it to another machine but there was no limit to how many times this could be done.

Shanen Boettcher, a general manager in Microsoft's Windows Vista unit, said: "It was something that had been abused from a piracy perspective before. We're just being clear it's one move from machine to machine that you are licensed for."

Vista Gets Transfer To New Machine Limits To Combat Piracy [software.silicon.com]

 

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 1:07 am on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Personally I don't see piracy as bad if there are no free alternatives

Try using that excuse when you're caught shoplifting or stealing a car.

incrediBILL

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 1:16 am on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Depending on how it is implemented, I could imagine a situation whereby hardware manufacturers sue Microsoft for making it hard for them to sell upgrade components.

Adding a component isn't a complete re-install

incrediBILL

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 1:21 am on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

If it had not been for piracy of Microsoft software they would have a much lower market share today. Microsoft has needed piracy at the bottom-feeder level to engender monopoly at all the higher levels.

OK, we both know that's nonsense as those three letters IBM on the from of those early PC's legitimized Microsoft and made them a household name. The alternatives didn't work nearly as well at the time which is why they became the monopoly. There was nothing else at work other than people needing to get jobs done without fighting tons of bugs in the OS and developers gravitated toward MSDOS when IBM came out as everyone knew using IBM hardware wouldn't get you fired.

Many of you may not remember CP/M-86, MP/M-86 or DR-DOS but they were all second rate and died a horrible death and we though were were done with it until Novell bought it up and kept trying to bring that dog back from the dead, nasty.

There was also GEOS and GEM and all sorts of other junk that also went POOF!

Even before the PC, people that wanted serious business applications installed those Microsoft Z-80 softcards in their Apple, or got a real computer in the first place but I digress.

[edited by: incrediBILL at 1:25 am (utc) on Oct. 18, 2006]

antonaf

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 1:52 am on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I can't see why Microsoft will go in this direction. It's definitely not a fight against piracy, its a plot to fatten their pockets. Taking this stance will definitely ruin sales for Microsoft because no one wants to purchase a two-time license, unless the price of the software dramatically drops (under $50). Myself, I rebuild my machines at least 3-4 times a year, many times just for fun (I have a test lab setup with legal copies of all Windows versions including server) and sometimes because a fresh install of Microsoft is sometimes needed. If they really wanted to combat piracy then they would just have you contact Microsoft to activate or use their current internet activation to validate your copy, not completely purchase a new license. This type of licensing is headed for a big lawsuit, I see a large class-action lawsuit in Microsoft future, because if I have to pay the full price for a new license because Microsoft software crashed my system twice (which isn't uncommon) then I will feel cheated. They would have to make their software 99.99% stable before they can think about penalizing users for re-installs.

Though, I see Symantec Ghost sales going up, because the best way around this is to make sure you create a ghost image of your inital setup and you should be fine, unless your hardware changes drastically.

******
EDIT
******

I think I was looking at this wrong. I was thinking of this as affecting reinstalls as well, but I see it is only a transfer to a new machine. That's not a biggie then, just have to make sure I remember which copy is for which machine. Maybe I'll make the computer name the last 5 digits of the license key :-)

Anyway, I still see ghost images being increasingly popular, with this licensing scheme.

willybfriendly

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 2:27 am on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Many of you may not remember CP/M-86, MP/M-86 or DR-DOS but they were all second rate and died a horrible death and we though were were done with it until Novell bought it up and kept trying to bring that dog back from the dead, nasty.

MS-DOS was at the right place at the right time. If memory serves me correctly, CPM was in the middle of a major rewrite when MS got the call.

Frankly, I found both MS-DOS and CPM to be less than intuitive and pretty clunky.

Apple and Commodore both had a lot going for them at the time. The Amiga was a pretty sweet machine.

IBM/MS did not win their market share because of quality. It was marketing, and IBM's decision to open their architecture. That was the birth of the PC industry - the day anyone could buy parts on the open market and put together a compatible computer.

'course I am getting a little white haired, so my memory may not be what it once was...

WBF

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 3:12 am on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

IBM/MS did not win their market share because of quality. It was marketing...

I disagree. Apple, Radio Shack, and other big-name vendors sold computers that felt more like toys or hobbyists' computers than serious business machines, with their cheap keyboards and 40-column monitors. The IBM PC was a solidly-built machine with a great Selectric-style keyboard, a sharp 80-column monitor, and an overall "turnkey package" not unlike that of the IBM DisplayWriter, IBM's much more expensive word processor of that era. Sure, IBM did some great marketing, but the product was also superior to Apple, TRS-80, Commodore, etc.--unlike the PS/2 that IBM introduced later on, which was an embarrassment that no amount of marketing could save.

willybfriendly

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 4:22 am on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

IBM may have been a nice machine. It was IBM compatibles that made the PC market (and MS-DOS).

80 column screens were available on the C-128 and Amiga. Commodore's proprietary interface to peripherals was a real downer though. IBM compatibles opened the door to mix and match systems that could be made to fit the exact needs of the user. Competition kept prices low - so low that IBM ultimately left the market that it started. Standardized expansion capabilities spawned entire companies - everything from SoundBlaster to Logitech.

With the exception of Apple, every manufacturer using a proprietary architecture succumbed. Apple very nearly went down too, but they managed to carve out a niche in schools and multimedia.

During the PC compatible phase there were a number of DOS options, all about equal. The competition forced innovation. MS had an advantage being the DOS of choice that was usually pre-installed, but it was not until somewhere around Window 3.01 that the system surpassed the competition in any real meaningful way.

There then ensued the unfair trade practices that still haunt MS. That put the final nails in the coffins of their competitors.

Since then, MS has shown very little innovation. XP was a major improvement in terms of stability. The Office suite about reached the limits of what it could be several years ago.

The pattern with MS has been to attain market dominance, and then rest on its laurels. IE 6 is a nice example of that, as is the time between OS version upgrades. That pattern does not make for a company that will be sustainable over the long haul. I would guess that they worry more than they let on about what they see in the rear view mirror these days - just as Intel, another "made by the PC compatible" company probably regrets not fully recognizing the AMD threat.

This is all way OT though. I have to say for myself I have a bias towards open source solutions. Not necessarily "free", but at least when you buy/acquire it, then it becomes yours to do what you will with it.

Purchasing a license to use is a rip off in my mind. Where but software do we see such a thing? Most products are yours once you pay for them. Software continues to belong to the company selling it. All you get for your $$$ is the right to use it, and even then only to use it in ways defined by the manufacturer.

You can own your computer, but you can't own the software that makes it work? Is that a scam, or what?

WBF

incrediBILL

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 5:42 am on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Purchasing a license to use is a rip off in my mind. Where but software do we see such a thing?

You might want to wake up and look around as you license music and video as well, you don't own squat except the media it's reproduced on.

You can own your computer, but you can't own the software that makes it work? Is that a scam, or what?

You own a record player but you don't own the records, cassettes came and out people purchased it again, CD's came out people purchased yet again.

Guess it's a good thing most people posting in this thread about MS lining their pockets don't live off their own intellectual property. Post a few of you domain names and I'll show you what piracy is all about in a major way when I come scrape your websites and put up MY version of your site and SEO your site into oblivion.

Same difference when you steal from Microsoft or anyone else, it's still stealing, grow up.

vincevincevince

WebmasterWorld Senior Member vincevincevince us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 6:49 am on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

You might want to wake up and look around as you license music and video as well, you don't own squat except the media it's reproduced on.

I can take an audio cassette and play it in the living room, on a portable tape player and in the car. I am also quite within my rights to take it to my friend's house and play it there. Should I wish I can cut out bits of the tape, add extra bits or even smash it up and use it as boring Christmas decorations.

lukasz

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 9:57 am on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

It will give other more legitimate Operating systems a better foot hold.

In what way are other operating systems more "legitimate" than Windows is?

Micro$oft achived its position using illegal monopolistic tactic (as confirmed by US court)

Not much different from bank robbers.

Wlauzon

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 11:02 am on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

If it had not been for piracy of Microsoft software they would have a much lower market share today. Microsoft has needed piracy at the bottom-feeder level to engender monopoly at all the higher levels....

Yup, and if not for Al Capone banks would be in much worst shape today...

Micro$oft achived its position using illegal monopolistic tactic (as confirmed by US court)..

That is NOT what the courts said. What they said was that MS was not allowing 3rd parties access to all of the source code that they "needed" to make their apps work with Windows.

But regardless, I think this WILL be an issue - not right away, but some months or a year or two down the line when people do their 3rd upgrade/hardware failure/whatever.

In fact my copy of XP is now on it's 3rd reinstall on the same machine. From what I see, I would have had to buy a new copy.

[edited by: Wlauzon at 11:06 am (utc) on Oct. 18, 2006]

bird

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 11:04 am on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I'd like to think that European Union law probably trumps Microsoft's shrink-wrapped EULA on this issue.

This is most likely invalid under US law as well (look up "principle of exhaustion" in a legal dictionary), even if there aren't quite as many obvious court decisions available yet as in Europe.

How many people will be affected by this? One in a thousand? One in ten thousand?

More like one in ten, or maybe even one in five.

Who the heck installs Windows anyway?

Most Windows users I know do this about once or twice a year, just because the system got too messed up and bogged down to fix by other means.

If the pirate clears off to some other platform, MS is no worse off. If it converts pirates to legitimate copies, then MS will gain.

The pirates will find ways around it. The honest buyers will be ripped off.

scintex

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 12:38 pm on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I think the first thing I will be doing is creating an image of my disk so I can restore to a "good" state. I am hoping this will be legit as technically I have transferred once (and the image is held on that machine).

It would be interesting to see what equation the software uses in order to determine what a "new machine" is. Component upgrades have to count purely as PCs by thier very nature are made up of components. It would be good to know what those key components are.

Also "transfer their software to a new machine once" - define "transfer" too. If I have a new copy of vista on a CD and I install it, is install = transfer?

willybfriendly

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 1:23 pm on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

You own a record player but you don't own the records, cassettes came and out people purchased it again, CD's came out people purchased yet again.

Guess it's a good thing most people posting in this thread about MS lining their pockets don't live off their own intellectual property....

As was pointed out, there is a vast difference between the licensing on music and video media vs software.

I'm not sure where the second part of the above comes from, since I never advocated any form of piracy, nor did I accuse MS of lining their pockets. My point was simply that MS market dominance was as much a result of the fortuitious intersection of events coupled with some troublingly hardball competitive practices, as it was quality and innovative products.

WBF

incrediBILL

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 5:23 pm on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

As was pointed out, there is a vast difference between the licensing on music and video media vs software

Not really. You don't own either and both have specific licensing details. Try playing a DVD made for Europe in the U.S. as there are codes and regional locks in the products. True, you can play the DVD at a friends house, as long as he doesn't live in France.

If you don't like the license don't buy the products as nobody is putting a gun to your head. You can always get a Mac with their OS pre-loaded or get some brand-x machine and install a copy of Ubuntu and load it up with Open Office and then sit and cry when things don't run as smooth as that's what tends to happen once you start down that path.

Nobody ever complains about Mac pre-installing the OS but MS is evil when Windows is pre-installed. Maybe we would be better off if Dell, HP, COMPAQ, Gateway, etc. all had their own OS software division like Apple does. Then we would have a true mess, no data or software interchangability and it would be just like the not-so-good old days when TRS-80, APPLE and COMMODORE couldn't read each others disks.

The rest of the piracy rant wasn't aimed at you, but other posts that condone it.

[edited by: incrediBILL at 5:24 pm (utc) on Oct. 18, 2006]

Philosopher

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 5:47 pm on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I don't hear anybody in this thread complaining about Windows being preinstalled. It's the possibility of not being able to reinstall it after significant upgrades etc. that is causing the problems.

As to DVD's sure their are region limits, but that is a FAR cry from not being able to move a piece of software from one computer to another that may only be 5 feet from it. That's not a good comparison at all.

willybfriendly

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 5:56 pm on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Nobody ever complains about Mac pre-installing the OS but MS is evil when Windows is pre-installed. Maybe we would be better off if Dell, HP, COMPAQ, Gateway, etc. all had their own OS software division like Apple does. Then we would have a true mess, no data or software interchangability and it would be just like the not-so-good old days when TRS-80, APPLE and COMMODORE couldn't read each others disks.

Again, we can agree that compatiblity is a nice thing to have.

The restrictive license is insane, in my opinion. I buy a CD/DVD/etc. and I can play it at home, in the car, on the plane or train, etc. I buy Win OS and I can install it once? Twice?

The discussion is not about pre-installed OS. It is about the ability to use the software on multiple machines - not necessarily simultaenously. I build a machine and install the OS. Machine dies, so I build another and install the OS. Machine dies, so I have to buy the OS anew? That is a problem. If the software stands the test of time, I should be able to install it now and for many years into the future.

I am not sure about you, but I tend to go through a new machine every couple of years. I am on my 4th box running XP right now. That would be three over the limit. My darling wife (lover her dearly) and/or kids have managed to get their machines so clogged up with spy/malware that I have had to reformat the disks and do a complete reinstall almost annually.

Meanwhile I am playing CD's purchased 10 years ago in the 6 month old player in my wife's car. The same version of Office has been in use for 5+ years across muiltiple machines. An old version of Phtoshop is still in use, etc.

WBF

incrediBILL

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 6:14 pm on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

My darling wife (lover her dearly) and/or kids have managed to get their machines so clogged up with spy/malware that I have had to reformat the disks and do a complete reinstall almost annually.

I taught my family not to download and install things, or click on emails they shouldn't. :)

If the hard disk dies, we'll talk about fixing it, if you messed it up doing something you shouldn't, ah well, that's a shame now isn't it...

Anyway, love it or hate it the license is what it is. I too replace machines about every 2 years and the OS is already loaded so I don't have a retail version and doubt I'll see a problem with this policy. Those people that buy the OS off the shelf might have issues and I haven't met anyone (in person anyway) that actually owned a retail version of Windows in so long I didn't think those people even existed anymore.

Until this thread, I thought they were an extinct species!

FWIW, if you get a Tivo, Sirius or XM and get a lifetime subscription you can't transfer it to new hardware, it's a one time deal. They're even more restrictive than the Windows Vista retail license as it appears the subscription is for the lifetime of the HARDWARE, not YOU!

[edited by: incrediBILL at 6:15 pm (utc) on Oct. 18, 2006]

Philosopher

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 6:31 pm on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

AGain, Tivo etc. are not good examples. They don't get munged up due to spyware, viruses, with anywhere NEAR the regularity that PC's do.

I've had a series 1 direc-tivo for 6 years...still running strong. That doesn't happen in the PC world.

incrediBILL

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 9:55 pm on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I've had a series 1 direc-tivo for 6 years...still running strong. That doesn't happen in the PC world.

Maybe it doesn't happen in YOUR PC world, it does in mine.

I've owned computers for over 25 years now and only had one active virus ever, which was an accident.

plumsauce

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 11:14 pm on Oct 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I've had a series 1 direc-tivo for 6 years...still running strong. That doesn't happen in the PC world.

This message is being sent from a computer on which the hard drive subsystem was first installed in 1998.

The drive subsystem has moved to a number of computers and has never been re-imaged. Failed drives are recovered from the mirror through hardware. Umm, NT4 sp6a.

So, 1 install, 4 computers. I just keep on moving the raid card and drives to newer computers. Reset the video driver and I'm good to go.

vincevincevince

WebmasterWorld Senior Member vincevincevince us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 12:19 am on Oct 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

The issue of preinstalled windows begs the question of whether that counts as one of your installs. I know many of us (especially those who set up PCs as part of their job) are in the habit of reformatting preinstalled systems immediately upon delivery. Would that mean the license is knocked-down to one install left?

bill

WebmasterWorld Administrator bill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Best Post Of The Month



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 1:36 am on Oct 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

This isn't an issue of re-installs on the same hardware. This is a matter of transferring your licensed copy of Windows from one piece of hardware to another.

According to the Microsoft representative quoted in the article I linked to above, MS has always considered the retail Windows licence to be a one-machine = 1 license scenario. This new EULA is just clarifying what they already have in place in the XP EULA. If your machine fails then it's OK to transfer that license to a new one.

From the sounds of it many of you are using a retail Windows license the same way as a volume/bulk/enterprise license would operate. You can't go running your PC repair business on one retail copy of Windows. The retail EULA doesn't allow for that.

vincevincevince

WebmasterWorld Senior Member vincevincevince us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 1:41 am on Oct 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

re-installs on the same hardware

Unless Microsoft have greatly improved their systems for identifying machines there is frequently no difference between the same machine and a different one.

At present if I have an activated XP installation and upgrade a component or two I'll be fine (it was a small and gradual enough change). The problem comes when I want to format the drive and reinstall windows - the machine identification has changed - XP has no record of the fact that the hardware was added slowly and gradually - and decides it's a new system.

If the same happens with Vista then it'll mean unless you leave the inside of your box untouched between reinstalls then it will use up a 'transfer' each time. Bearing in mind that many people send their PC to a repair shop specifically to have hardware upgrades (memory, harddrive, etc.) and have the drive wiped and reinstalled at the same time - this is going to be a very common problem.

willybfriendly

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 2:59 am on Oct 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

According to the Microsoft representative quoted in the article I linked to above, MS has always considered the retail Windows licence to be a one-machine = 1 license scenario.

Interesting. From the XP EULA

1.1 Installation and use. You may install, use, access, display and run one copy of the Software on a single computer, such as a workstation, terminal or other device ("Workstation Computer"). The Software may not be used by more than one processor at any one time on any single Workstation Computer.

And later,

13. SOFTWARE TRANSFER. Internal. You may move the Software to a different Workstation Computer. After the transfer, you must completely remove the Software from the former Workstation Computer.

Assuming the above is written in English, it says I can run the software on one computer at a time, and that I can transfer it to a different computer.

Further,

The initial user of the Software may make a one-time permanent transfer of this EULA and Software to another end user, provided the initial user retains no copies of the Software.

I can even sell, give or otherwise pass on the right to use the software to another person.

WBF

webdoctor

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 5:47 am on Oct 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

The initial user of the Software may make a one-time permanent transfer of this EULA and Software to another end user, provided the initial user retains no copies of the Software.

I can even sell, give or otherwise pass on the right to use the software to another person.

IANAL but I think it's the "one-time" bit that conflicts with European law. Why do MSFT have the right to add restrictions on me on a lawful sale of something I lawfully purchased from them?

Imagine if you found this in the "licence agreement" for your car:
the initial purchaser of this Car may make a one-time permanent transfer of this Car to another owner, provided the initial user retains no copies of the Car

I'm sure Detroit would love that, but would it stand up in court? :-)

adamas

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 7:33 am on Oct 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

I'm not in favour of the change being discussed but on the issue of transfering to another person...

If you've made a transfer and retained no copies just how are you expecting to make a second transfer anyway? Just sounds like belt and braces making sure to me.

adfree

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 7:35 am on Oct 19, 2006 (gmt 0)


System: The following message was spliced on to this thread from: http://www.webmasterworld.com/microsoft_windows_os/3126637.htm [webmasterworld.com] by bill - 4:54 pm on Oct. 19, 2006 (jst +9)


Anyone careless enough not to study the entire
VISTA EULA in detail and switching machines neglecting the license transfer or switching the machine or mother board more than once (just once per copy!) will have to acquire a new copy? [newsfactor.com]

From where I am sitting: this Vista Kill Switch will kill Vista and MS's credibility BIG TIME! Your take?

Leosghost

WebmasterWorld Senior Member leosghost us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 10:35 am on Oct 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

The previous link in the post which was spliced appears to be to a page which is unavailable to those outside the USA ( without a "workaround" ) ..

The link leads to splash page with one large ad ..and a link to the next page again with a large ad ..and so on ..and so on ..and so on ..( no other content on any of the pages )..;-)

Difficult to see what the link brings to the debate?

this latest is against EU law ..( BTW as is the non support of any software less than 10 years old ..XP SP1 falls into that category ) will be challenged in EU courts ..and isnt too hard to get around anyway as have indicated plumsauce and others ..there are still other ways ..hotswap HD's etc ..external HD's on USB ( and a little tweaking )..but it will piss off the average non tech user very very fast ( especially as when one buys amachine with an OS pre installed one is not signing up to any EULA ..in fact one will not see the EULA until one gets the machine home ..and one has already paid for it ..thus I suspect even US law is contravened by the EULA ..

So presumably all the discussion only applies to the USA?

[edited by: Leosghost at 10:45 am (utc) on Oct. 19, 2006]

bill

WebmasterWorld Administrator bill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Best Post Of The Month



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 10:39 am on Oct 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

The link works for me from Japan, but I agree that they do have an annoying interstitial you have to be patient with. (It may not last) The article's more of a summary of what we've been talking about already.

kaled

WebmasterWorld Senior Member kaled us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3123986 posted 11:17 am on Oct 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

If Microsoft really want to be this paranoid, they should switch to renting the OS instead of selling it.

Set the price of Vista to $10.00 per quarter ($30.00 per year if paid annually). Require activation whenever it expires - simple.

If there is a hardware failure and you're paying quarterly then you're only out $10.00. You take a slightly greater risk if you pay yearly. If you perpetually upgrade, this would be no great additional cost or inconvenience (if you pay quarterly).

Manufacturers like Dell would also like this since they could reduce prices.

So, given that someone at MS is bound to have thought of this and you can be certain Bill & Co. have considered it, why have they not chosen this approach? The answer is very simple, they don't have sufficient confidence in their ability to write the necessary code securely.

Kaled.

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