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Linux, Unix, and *nix like Operating Systems Forum

    
LAMP installation
Linux newbie requests some guidelines.
microduma




msg:3784342
 7:50 pm on Nov 11, 2008 (gmt 0)

I have done minor local web site development on Windows, and a working WAMP was a snap to install via Apache2Triad. Currently I am running Ubuntu 8.4 (desktop edition), and returning to WIndows is not an option. I now have to install LAMP to run Drupal on, quite urgently. My knowledge of Linux will gradually increase, but I still find it a bit overwhelmed by it at present; half the problem is that there is so much to learn, and the other half is that there is so much information available!.

Is there a way in which I may quickly set up LAMP, in such a way that the data on my server data can only be accessed by myself? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

 

graeme_p




msg:3784720
 11:07 am on Nov 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

From ubuntuguide.org:

System-->Administration-->Synaptic Package Manager-->
Edit-->Mark Packages by Task-->LAMP server -->Apply

That gives you a LAMP stack.

Incidentally, other distros have similar features. Mandriva gives you a GUI for simple configuration of Apache (more advanced stuff requires editing the config file)

Is there a way in which I may quickly set up LAMP, in such a way that the data on my server data can only be accessed by myself?

Not sure what you mean by this. So only you can edit the data, or it can only be browsed from you desktop? Either can be done.

microduma




msg:3784747
 12:30 pm on Nov 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

Thank you very much graeme_p, this was very helpful. My intention is that it it can only be browsed and edited from my desktop.

mcavic




msg:3785197
 10:09 pm on Nov 12, 2008 (gmt 0)

My intention is that it it can only be browsed and edited from my desktop

Three ways to accomplish that would be to block outside access through your firewall, password-protect the site using .htaccess, or run Apache on a custom port.

microduma




msg:3785810
 6:22 pm on Nov 13, 2008 (gmt 0)

Thanks once again. I have found additional info on -htaccess; it seems as if it is what I need.

microduma




msg:3790610
 5:03 pm on Nov 20, 2008 (gmt 0)

I have been left with no option but to abandon MSW completely, and I have been running my desktop exclusively on Ubuntu 8.04 for about 2 months now.

Fortunately I was running a dual boot system (Windows XP/ Mandriva for a while before, doing my website work mostly on Windows. I never made enough of an effort to study Linux in more depth; I regret it now.

I say that I was fortunate however, because by the time I was compelled to switch to Ubuntu, I already knew that Linux was adequate for me, as well as how to get the job done, (but with a few special exceptions.)

I am also no techie, but I am slowly starting to reap some benefits for trying to actually solve my Ubuntu problems on my own. I think that to make the most of Linux, one has got to be prepared to invest in it. (Note that I say 'make the most', not 'use Linux productively'.)

I have found Linux users (in general) extremely helpful and unselfish. I hope to some day know enough to return the favor. Maybe I sound dogmatic, but it is really the way I am experiencing it.

graeme_p




msg:3793597
 6:20 am on Nov 25, 2008 (gmt 0)

Very nicely put. The helpful and knowledgeable community is a major advantage of using Linux.

I think it is also self-perpetuating (as you imply). People who have been helped are easily persuaded to help others when we can etc.

wheel




msg:3793994
 5:11 pm on Nov 25, 2008 (gmt 0)

Most of my problems with linux went away over the years as I updated to newer versions. My screens started to look better, my wireless cares started to work automatically, the funky keys on my laptop like brightness and contrast worked one day, and a number of years ago my sound worked.

The last thing that they just fixed in my distro (Mandriva) is the ability to auto-update everything, including the kernel. That's a big problem right now....my server is on an old version of mandriva. I daren't just upgrade on a live server that abruptly so I have to build an entire duplicate system offsite, upgrade to test, then perform the upgrade or swap at the datacenter. Not something I want to do...

With the newer releases it looks like I can get 100% upgrades online, including new versions and new kernels, something I couldn't do before. ANd that means I can update 100% remotely through the years.

Kinda like being able to move from 98 to xp to vista incrementally, without a CD and on a live system.

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