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Value of blog review (links)
Value of links from non-link pages?
majjk




msg:3995543
 10:34 am on Sep 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

I have been doing almost everything I can think of in order to reach that #1 spot in Google. The site has been live for nearly 2 years, with proper link development for 7 months (it is a commercial site, so getting links isn't the easiest thing).

I make sure I get a few new links every week, and have been doing so during these past 7 months. In doing this I am making sure I get the same mixture of pr0-pr7 that my main competitors (top5 in Google for my keyword phrase) have, i.e. a few high pr, more mid pr and lots of pr0. I also made sure that the anchor text varies and targets the key phrase in 40-50% of the links (just as my main competitors). Just a handful links are reciprocal (to really relevant and high quality sites) while the rest is one-way links. Almost every link is coming from "link pages".

After initial progress, I am now stuck in position 5-6, where I have been for the past 6 weeks. Before that I spent 2 months in position 6-8.

As you can see, the progress has slowed down to almost nothing, and at this pace I can expect to reach the top at some point in 2017... or something.

My main concern isn't the slow progress, but the fact that I have exhausted my options... what else can I do? Forget the onsite seo, I have looked into it all. The only thing I can think of is my lack of links from "regular" pages, i.e. not link pages.

So my thought is that I maybe should contact bloggers (nice quality ones and seem interested in my kind of products) and offer them a product for free, in return for a review on their blog (including links of course). My cheapest products cost $40, so even a cheap one is of some value.

So here is my question: do you think this is what I am missing? Do you think these kind of links (on a dedicated page) are worth a lot? If they are just worth slightly more than a link on a regular link page, then getting a blog review link every 2 weeks or so is not going to make much difference...

Thoughts?

 

piatkow




msg:3995547
 10:42 am on Sep 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

My knowledge may be out of date as I was worrying about this several years ago but as I understand it a page passes a fixed amount of "link juice" which is shared between all the outbound links. All links get a share but if the link is "nofollow" then its share is lost.

I wouldn't have thought handing out samples for review would be cost effective purely for link building but if the blog has a decent readership then think of it in the same way as getting a review from a printed journal with the link as a bonus.

[edited by: piatkow at 10:53 am (utc) on Sep. 25, 2009]

majjk




msg:3995551
 10:53 am on Sep 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

I don't think nofollow is an issue as that usually only applies to comments, right? If a blogger writes an article about my products and stick a link or two in that article, then those links will be proper ones, not nofollow.

But the issue about getting links from proper pages, not just link pages, do you think that will provide a boost or am is it just wishful thinking?

wheel




msg:3995588
 12:41 pm on Sep 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

This isn't overly scientific, but I would work on two things, not neccesarily in this order:
1) in content links. That's what you're talking about by getting blogs to link to you. Whether you pay for them is something else, but I prefer links from within lots of written content.
2) Getting some authority links. Forget PR specifically, find the top authority sites in your niche then do what you need to do to get a link. i.e. find the association for your industry, or some old school authority site. Spend weeks to get that one link if you have to. Target them specifically, create a project on your site specifically for that if you have to. Spend the work you're doing now to get 30 links and put that energy into that one over the top link that no one else has.

That's the old refrain 'quality over quantity'. As you know it's not easy - but consider redirecting your efforts towards that end. Pick that site that would be a killer link. Then spend a week blue skying as to what you could possibly do to seal the deal. Then spend the time to implement it. Do that for a year, and then next year you've got 30 links that no one else can possibly get.

majjk




msg:3995845
 7:25 pm on Sep 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

1) in content links. That's what you're talking about by getting blogs to link to you. Whether you pay for them is something else, but I prefer links from within lots of written content.

I have started looking for suitable blogs, which is very time consuming... and I've also sent out some emails to bloggers and suggested a review in exchange for a free sample. The response rate was quite poor. This means I'm likely to spend a lot of time on this... so I kinda would like an indication that I'm on the right track before venturing into this, spending loads of time in the pursuit of a handful of links. I mean, will a handful of in content links make a huge difference?

2) Getting some authority links.

I have spent a lot of time trawling sites related to my area, and I can't really think of a single "authority" site out there. I guess some areas are simply considered too uninspiring and not very important and therefore no authority site has emerged. Anyway, I know what you mean, and if I would have been in a different area this would have been a great thing to do...

wheel




msg:3995858
 7:48 pm on Sep 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

Majik.

First, yes, blog links work. Paying for blog links in large volumes works great right now. Buy enough blog links, you'll rank.

How that translates into 'non-paid' blog links is problematic as you pointed out. Yes if you got enough free incontent blog links I believe you'll rank. Of course you then look like you're buying links and when the sites that buy large numbers of blog links eventually fall from the serps you may get caught up i that as well. My opinion would be to do some free blog links, but don't do it as a basis. Get what you can, move on. Make your backlinks look varied.

In terms of the authority sites, I bet there are authority sites. First authority sites -those that rank. Another place to look, those that link to those that rank. If that's not doing it yet, start looking at areas that 'touch' your market. Anyplace in your supply chain from initial product through to retail, any other market or industry that relates to any of those steps - go looking there for links.

For example,lets say you're a mortgage broker and claim the only sites inthe industry are other mortgage broker sites, no authorities (though I think that's wrong). mortgage brokers place a service on a physical good. On the service side, look at interest rates. Anything interest rate related - studies, banks and financial institutions, and so on. On the physical goods, realtors, construction people. Anything to do with land or building. There's lots of authorities there.

idolw




msg:4007350
 6:13 am on Oct 15, 2009 (gmt 0)

Are you 100% you must be #1 for this keyword?
Are you 100% sure the traffic from this keyword will be so huge?
How about getting into Top5 for a 1000 easier keywords by using well-done content and extremely diversified anchor texts? This will not only deliver more traffic but also should be safer in terms of penalty.

brickmarketing




msg:4010108
 2:57 pm on Oct 20, 2009 (gmt 0)

Have you taken a look to see how much of an age difference there is between your domain and the ones in front of you? Age of a domain will make a big difference on your rankings. Trust factor of an aged domain is something you cannot really do anything against.

guia




msg:4010599
 7:24 am on Oct 21, 2009 (gmt 0)

But perhaps the most important point to make of all is this:
Links in blog posts are permanent links.Ill start by assuming you already know the value of inbound links, and that your Link Popularity (how many links point to your page) and Link Reputation (the quality of those links) directly affect your rankings in the major search engines. Simply put, the more links that point to your domain (and specifically, to individual pages) and the more relevant those links are the better your web pages will rank in the search results.

majjk




msg:4012273
 4:47 pm on Oct 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

Are you 100% you must be #1 for this keyword?
Are you 100% sure the traffic from this keyword will be so huge?
How about getting into Top5 for a 1000 easier keywords by using well-done content and extremely diversified anchor texts? This will not only deliver more traffic but also should be safer in terms of penalty.

You have a point... but aiming at, say, 50-100 easier keywords means I have to write up loads of new pages, all of which need to be promoted in the same way as the page I'm currently focus on.

If I would feel a top spot for this #1 keyword would be beyond me, then I might go that route. But as the work involved is just as punishing, I think I will keep my strategy roughly as it is. It should be noted though that I have started slowly to promote 10 pages or so, covering all the other top10 keywords... just as some kind of insurance policy.

majjk




msg:4012292
 5:16 pm on Oct 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

Have you taken a look to see how much of an age difference there is between your domain and the ones in front of you? Age of a domain will make a big difference on your rankings. Trust factor of an aged domain is something you cannot really do anything against.

I have in fact the youngest domain, 1 year 9 months accoring to some domain-age-tool. My top10 competition all range between 2y 9m and 9y 2m, where the top spot is for one that is 3y 11m.

Comments on those numbers?

majjk




msg:4012312
 5:42 pm on Oct 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

My thought so far has been that search engines does not care whether a page is the index page or not, i.e. there is no difference between

domain.com/

and

domain.com/whatever.htm

and for that matter

domain.com/dir/whatever.htm

Or to put it differently, if the 3 pages above are all identical, including all have same amount of incoming link juice, then any outgoing links carry the same weight. Is that your understanding as well?

The reason for mentioning this is that most of my competitors have quite a number of links coming in from

domain1.com
domain2.com
domain3.com

while (almost) all my links come from pages such as

domain1.com/links.htm
domain2.com/links.htm
domain3.com/links/links.htm

does it matter?

ewriter




msg:4014819
 9:21 am on Oct 28, 2009 (gmt 0)

What is lucking to you is the back link for high authority site. You can have many links as much as you want but the high PR site give high PR too

majjk




msg:4014871
 12:08 pm on Oct 28, 2009 (gmt 0)

What is lucking to you is the back link for high authority site. You can have many links as much as you want but the high PR site give high PR too

I believe there is a general lack of authority sites in my area. Not even the top ranked sites, my competitors, have such links. The high PR links they have are either proper quality link pages (like I also have) or (I guess) paid links on the index page of a number of sites. I suppose the next best thing to aim for is high PR links from sites in neighbouring areas... but to get such links is for natural reasons somewhat more tricky.

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