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Non-English Sites Linking to English Site: Any Impact?
SE Ranking and Spamming
bilalseo




msg:3876367
 3:01 pm on Mar 22, 2009 (gmt 0)

Last night I had a hot coverasation with my new client. I wouldn't mention his name here, but it was quite interseting. He is running an english version website. But according to his statement, he needs some backlinks from German, Dutch, Spainish, etc languages websites. Well as far as my experience is concerned, I never do that before. But personally I'd say that it would come under spamming. Because when some nonenglish websites linking to a an english version website, it could get harmed while making connection. How does google treat this? will it be a spam or it comes under quality linking.

thanks

bilal

 

Makaveli2007




msg:3876392
 4:03 pm on Mar 22, 2009 (gmt 0)

I highly doubt it's considered spam (unless it's done excessively).

However, why would he want backlinks from sites in other languages if he has an English-language site to rank? It's just unnecessary, unless he's trying to target English speaking searches in germany, Spain, etc. - which of course might be a market niche Im not aware of :P

nealrodriguez




msg:3876408
 4:32 pm on Mar 22, 2009 (gmt 0)

it sounds like a few clients with whom i've worked that want to expand internationally. the quick answer would be to create foreign language sections or pages to which foreign language sites can point links. another way would be to register domains in foreign tld's in the countries where your client would like to operate. i have seen foreign tld's rank with little optimization in the google foreign tld - e.g. domain.co.uk ranking for 'buy widget' on google.co.uk

bilalseo




msg:3876441
 5:29 pm on Mar 22, 2009 (gmt 0)

hey ... sooooooooo good answers you I have from you guys.. actually he needs to expand his business in such countries, and wants me to write some contents for him. But I guess it could harm his website, as the links are totally against the english website. anyways.. thanks for your help dudes :) God Bless You.

Makaveli2007




msg:3876575
 9:20 pm on Mar 22, 2009 (gmt 0)

If we forget about search engines:

How much sense would it make to receive traffic from these countries to an English-language version of the site? Of course, it depends on the country and on the demographic.

For example, I hear everybody in Amsterdam speaks great English (my sister lives there) and maybe its similar in most of Holland. In Germany many college students (I am a German college student ;-)) speak good English.

However most Germans I know would probably click the back button and go to a competitor instead...if they clicked on an English-language page in the first place.

Hold on - what kind of keywords is he trying to rank for in the first place?! English keywords (in those markets)?

I assume he doesnt have a local business (unless he works in tourism) otherwise attracting clients from other countries wouldnt make sense.

Take this into consideration, please:

If he's trying to rank for English-speaking keywords (and doesnt have a local tourism site or something like that) in those countries (Germany, etc.) then getting links from those countries wont really help him much. Here in Germany if I do a search in English the results are slightly different, but it's usually pretty much the same sites that I see in the US- and UK-Serps.

My guess would be that your client probably simply thinks "going international" is "great" without having too much of an idea what he's trying to achieve.

If you have any questions on the German market, you can shoot me a PM if you want.

Makaveli2007




msg:3876577
 9:22 pm on Mar 22, 2009 (gmt 0)

What's the point of expanding in such countries and then showing them an English-language website?

There are people who dont search in English in those countries. They wont see the website.

And there are people in those countries that do search in English (very few compared to those who use their native otngue), and they see pretty much the same search results that people see when they search in English but are in the US or in the UK. It's somewhat different, but really not much.

I think if he wants to expand he should have a version in the local language or it simply doesn't make any sense.

nealrodriguez




msg:3876626
 10:50 pm on Mar 22, 2009 (gmt 0)

And there are people in those countries that do search in English (very few compared to those who use their native otngue), and they see pretty much the same search results that people see when they search in English but are in the US or in the UK. It's somewhat different, but really not much.

i have seen country specific tld's rank higher than their foreign counterparts for English keywords; for instance, i have seen a .co.uk pr 2 website rank higher than a popular pr 5 .com page on google.co.uk; however, if i perform the same search on google.com that same pr 5 .com will take the top position and the .co.uk wont even show up on page one.

actually he needs to expand his business in such countries

explore registering national tld's specific to the country in which your client plans to expand; create link bait in any language that people may query in that question; that said, try to figure out how they refer to your service or product in that country because although English is spoken in a different country they may query the search engines with other words than may be used in the u.s. to find companies like your client's.

bilalseo




msg:3876923
 1:45 pm on Mar 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

yes he has given me english keywords, as his site is totally english based website. Actually he is selling some undergarments but needs some foriegn clients specifically from these countries... I like the idea of creating sub domains for specific countries to attract local visits. Sub domains can help making new customers locally and send them to its original domain for purchasing and placing orders. I've no such experience in foriegn languages except english. And it is so hard to find out some non-english keywords and either write some contents other than english. I have been trying to find out the way we go eaisly. you guys suggestions/opinions in order to find out the best solutions could help me to answer him very clearly.

bilal

Makaveli2007




msg:3877857
 7:29 pm on Mar 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

Why does he need clients specifically from those countries?

It reminds me of people I know that think their website will be more successful if it "goes international" or "go global". The simple fact of doing so won't increase a website's ROI. It might actually decrease it.

nealrodriguez




msg:3877877
 8:04 pm on Mar 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

I like the idea of creating sub domains for specific countries to attract local visits.

if you're referring to my idea, i meant registering domains with foreign tlds in the countries where your client wants to operate; so if his site is myclient.com, and he is planning to open an office in dubai, register myclient.ae, and write the content specific to that country on that tld;

georgeek




msg:3878663
 6:23 pm on Mar 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

One of my sites is a "narrow niche" news blog which reports relevant news in the "narrow niche" from all over the world in English for an English audience.

Very often foreign language websites will link to a specific post because it is the first source they see with the information about which they are writing.

The inbound links for the site have TLDs from all over the world and I have to say Google loves it!



bwnbwn




msg:3878719
 7:38 pm on Mar 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

Don't forget English is considered a universal language and most not all countries are teaching it now as a required language in schools.

I know in India knowing the English language will get you a better job same as many places in the world so getting a site to rank in english in another country isn't that bad an idea, anyway most all people can use the google translator with ease.

nealrodriguez




msg:3878752
 8:19 pm on Mar 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

Don't forget English is considered a universal language and most not all countries are teaching it now as a required language in schools.

especially for business and technology.

designaweb




msg:3878870
 11:06 pm on Mar 25, 2009 (gmt 0)

From my personal experience, I can say that European countries perform a lot of English searches, and they convert really well. The better the population speaks English, the more volume in English searches there is.

Additionally, it makes a lot of sense to link to English websites from a user point of view. Let's take Wikipedia as an example. If I have written an article on purple pony plugs, and there isn't an article available on the Dutch version of Wikipedia, I'll link to the English version instead as my target audience will be able to read the English version anyway.

For example, I hear everybody in Amsterdam speaks great English (my sister lives there) and maybe its similar in most of Holland. In Germany many college students (I am a German college student ;-)) speak good English.

Yes it's similar in the rest of Holland. We learn English at the age of 10. (The time is... ten pee-em)

signor_john




msg:3878993
 3:22 am on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

From my personal experience, I can say that European countries perform a lot of English searches, and they convert really well.

That's been my experience, too.

old_expat




msg:3879004
 4:33 am on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

I have a travel site about a very small/niche destination. The site is english language, most of my visitors are Scandinavian. Most of the sites linking to mine are Scandinavian. Users will go where they find information.

OddDog




msg:3879064
 7:29 am on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

In reference to th oringal opīs question.

Yes I believe it does have a postive impact. The idea that I should not attract a link from a french language to to a spannish one jsut because there in different languages seems really daft to me. I know people that speak 5 languages fluently. Bilingualism in europe has pretty much become the norm, especially in the sub 30 year olds generation.

Back to the op question. In my opinion language is not the issue. Relevancy is.

[edited by: OddDog at 7:29 am (utc) on Mar. 26, 2009]

jecasc




msg:3879072
 8:15 am on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

Let's choose a random topic. For example "link developement".

How many sites in dutch, albanian, danish, maltese, czech, slovene, macedonian, romanian, galician, icelandic are there on this topic?

Probably not many. So if someone has a website in slovene and wants to link to a website with more information on this topic. What language will the website he will point to be? Slovene, too?

Guess again.

There are probably more websites on "link developement" alone in english than the total number of websites on any topic in maltese.

2clean




msg:3879085
 8:52 am on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

It's absolutely absurd to ever entertain the idea that linking from a website that's target language is not the same as the website being linked to may be considered spammy. Depending on how much resources you've got to follow the setup of country level based domains (.jp .es.pt.za), because let's face it, when you go down this route it can become a little bit more complicated then just housing everything under one domain, this is a valid path.

However, subdomains or even just straight domain.com/language/ will start to generate inbound links to correctly categorize a site in the relevant indexes. It's just that wih country specific domains, the chance is that it will come off better. But then if you've got an old domain with good inbound links creating other language versions under the main domain is likely to get better rankings to begin with then starting with a domain from scratch.

For interest: There are 47 million results in Google under a Maltese domain. and 476,000 under a .com with the keyword "link development". I think we'd have a problem trying to ascertain any accurate figures on English prevalence, but what I am sure of is that Europe is a small place with a disproportionate voice ;) and we'd be wise not to try and make too much in the way of generalizations about online user habits unless they have a solid foundation. :)

editsha




msg:3879115
 10:16 am on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

Non-English Sites Linking to English Site: Any Impact?
Hmm i would say it's fine ...
as most of the global sites have localized websites (with diffrent domain name .jp,kr.cn.tw etc)and they do link to each other, so eticallly they are doing the right thing and each website will get the benifits.

In countries like China and Korea to do e-business you need an registration number, and if they find out you don't have one - then your website would be either blocked (from sem) or banned. so in such cases having a link building with an chinees/korean website were you expect you target audience to reach and then getting them back to your website is an feasible option..

also

Makaveli2007




msg:3879127
 10:46 am on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

Yes it's similar in the rest of Holland. We learn English at the age of 10. (The time is... ten pee-em)

Actually we start learning English at age 10, too, yet most people (except for college students, I guess) do not speak English well. The majority of them would never perform a search in English, though.

Ive heard the reason was that most dutch movies were subtitled or something? Actually Ive heard that about Sweden (and I think other Scandinavian countries).

My sister said when she first moved to Amsterdam, she was more than surprised that the reply to her question "Can you speak English?" was an "Of course, I do!".

From what Ive heard most Dutch people and Scandiavians are excellent when it comes to English. However the rest of Europe is not like that. In Germany, etc. there are quite a few (many) people who can speak decent English, I think (but most are far from fluent except for c ollege students and business people). Whereas in the South of Europe, the level of English is a lot lower in general, except for tourist destinations maybe. Ive been to Valencia (in Spain) for example, and loved it ;), but nobody really spoke a word of English.

jecasc




msg:3879184
 12:10 pm on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

For interest: There are 47 million results in Google under a Maltese domain. and 476,000 under a .com with the keyword "link development".

But have you checked how many of those Maltese websites are actually in maltese? Most of them are in english.

Makaveli2007




msg:3879215
 12:42 pm on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

For interest: There are 47 million results in Google under a Maltese domain. and 476,000 under a .com with the keyword "link development". I think we'd have a problem trying to ascertain any accurate figures on English prevalence

I'm not sure what you mean exactly (if you type in link development and search for pages with a maltese .tld? Im sorry I didnt get that part?), but:

- English is an official language in Malta (the only official language other than Maltese if I am to trust wikipedia)
- I've thought of travelling there in the future (because English is said to be spoken so widely in Malta..and I like travelling to places where I can make myself understood :-))
- 2 friends of mine actually went there to learn English at a language school 10 years ago

Malta, the Netherlands & Scandinavia are not representative of the grasp of English of most European countries (I'm not going to mention the UK, now ;)).

signor_john




msg:3879267
 2:26 pm on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

It's absolutely absurd to ever entertain the idea that linking from a website that's target language is not the same as the website being linked to may be considered spammy.

I link to foreign-language sites all the time--sometimes directly, and sometimes via Google Translate. For example, if I'm writing an article on public horsecart transportation in Equineville, and if the Equineville Transit site is only in Equinian, I'll provide essential information in English and let my English-speaking readers go to the Equineville Transit site where timetables and maps should be fairly easy to decipher even for those who don't read Equinian.

Malta, the Netherlands & Scandinavia are not representative of the grasp of English of most European countries

So what? My site is in English, but it has substantial audiences in Germany, France, and Italy because of its subject matter. I'm sure the audiences in those countries would be even larger if the site's content were translated into Grmany, French, and Italian, but that's a whole separate issue. The fact of the matter is that my English-language site is already being read (and generating revenue) in Germany, France, and Italy, and it attracts unsolicited inbound links from German, French, and Italian sites.

Makaveli2007




msg:3879374
 4:05 pm on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

Congratulations on your success signor_john. I just meant to say that Malta in particular is a bad example when were talking English-language use in Europe, because English is an official language in Malta.

signor_john




msg:3879431
 4:59 pm on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

Sorry. I misunderstood. (All this talk of Malta makes me want a wee dram of malt or a bag of Maltesers...)

nealrodriguez




msg:3879453
 5:12 pm on Mar 26, 2009 (gmt 0)

this reminds me of the facebook connnect page that has a link to a wordpress plugin the description of which was written in Spanish; it has now been translated, but the rest of the site remains in Spanish. now if i wanted to use that plugin, for my blog that link definitely would have helped me from a usability perspective; why shouldn't google count the link? a disclaimer: i speak fluent spanish; however, a non-spanish speaker can easily pop the description into the google translator; now, i haven't seen this, but can google translate the meaning of the foreign language words as anchor and surrounding text next to the link, and help rank the linked site for english terms?

i see spanish language sites linking to my english site just because it has a spanish domain. there is a spanish language social network that links to english sites, which some users submit, and offers an option to translate the site.

you may want to offer an option to translate the content on your site for enhanced usability for the people visiting through those foreign language links.

bilalseo




msg:3885411
 11:15 am on Apr 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

:) Great discussion, I never think about :) you guys gave me lot of ideas and thoughts .. thanks to all you guys havnig such a great conversation :) but I think it still going on....

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