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Google Chrome - Google's Browser Project
pageoneresults




msg:3736046
 4:55 pm on Sep 1, 2008 (gmt 0)

Google Chrome, Google's Browser Project
[techcrunch.com...]

Unlike other modern web browsers, which can only run one process at a time, Google Chrome will give each tab its own process. This speeds up overall performance and saves the entire browser from crashing when one tab causes problems.

The multi-process design requires more memory allocation up front but less memory over time as users tend to multitask. It also prevents your computer from slowing down after you browse for an extended period of time and open/close lots of tabs.

[edited by: Brett_Tabke at 2:31 pm (utc) on Sep. 3, 2008]
[edit reason] fixed link. [/edit]

 

incrediBILL




msg:3737479
 4:28 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

Google use any of your copyrighted material posted to the web via Chrome without paying you a cent.

And you use Chrome without paying Google a cent, point?

Google already uses all your web pages (cache) without paying you a cent, point?

jdMorgan




msg:3737480
 4:29 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

Astute readers would have noted that the Terms in question refer to Google Services, and have nothing to do with Chrome itself.

Jim

incrediBILL




msg:3737482
 4:31 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

This is starting to remind me of all the people that join AdSense and get booted out because they didn't bother reading the T&Cs in the first place.

It's a contact, read it before clicking OK, it's not that complicated.

Astute readers would have noted that the Terms in question refer to Google Services, and have nothing to do with Chrome itself.

Do you allow Google to cache your pages?

If the answer is YES then this ship has already sailed...

[edited by: incrediBILL at 4:32 pm (utc) on Sep. 3, 2008]

Zamboni




msg:3737507
 4:55 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

It would be nice if chrome would password protect or have the option to master password your saved passwords like FF.

Also while working in our adwords accounts sometimes the dropdown area to change the date range is missing.

Quadrille




msg:3737509
 5:03 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

I miss autofill, and the 'open all tabs' option in bookmark folders.

Else it's been a pretty smooth changeover. Now, howsabout an email/news reader that blocks all spam and allows us to ban Googlegroups users?

tangor




msg:3737519
 5:11 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

The google tos for chrome goes a bit beyond "cache"!

Seb7




msg:3737530
 5:32 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

By submitting, posting or displaying the content, you give Google a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free and non-exclusive licence to reproduce, adapt, modify, translate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute any Content that you submit, post or display on or through the Services.

Thats a little scary. Google has rights to your content?

zett




msg:3737538
 5:40 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

By submitting, posting or displaying the content, you give Google a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free and non-exclusive licence to reproduce, adapt, modify, translate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute any Content that you submit, post or display on or through the Services.

Madmen!

By DISPLAYING a piece of content I give Google a licence to use this content? Don't think so. If a visitor looks at MY content, I grant him a very limited licence to display the content on his computer. This definitely excludes the right to grant a licence to a 3rd party (e.g. Google).

Google gets more bizarre every single day.

Luftmenschen




msg:3737540
 5:42 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

The merging of the address bar and search bar in Chrome gives Google too much control over navigation. It separates companies and website operators from their website addresses and brands.

Companies spend heavily to establish and maintain brands. Google has just imposed itself between consumers and businesses. Direct navigation has now become proprietary search, whereby Google uses its discretion to filter out web addresses and domains that it deems less relevant.

Bddmed




msg:3737553
 6:04 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

A more appropriate quote would be:
You retain copyright and any other rights you already hold in Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services. By submitting, posting or displaying the content you give Google a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, and non-exclusive licence to reproduce, adapt, modify, translate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute any Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services. This licence is for the sole purpose of enabling Google to display, distribute and promote the Services and may be revoked for certain Services as defined in the Additional Terms of those Services.

As that's the paragraph. I read it as they can do whatever they want with what people type into their search boxes except when it would violate copyrights. We receive that info too for people landing on our pages. Don't we?

Also this applies to all Google services.
[google.com...]

We're getting a bit too paranoid now IMHO.

Quadrille




msg:3737606
 7:01 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

We're getting a bit too paranoid now IMHO.

Don't you believe it; it takes more than facts to silence the Tin Foil Hat Brigade, and, given the chance, this thread - like every Google thread - will be turned into the same old, same old, same old .... well, you get the point.

night707




msg:3737608
 7:04 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

What would happen, if Google decide to keep their search only available for users surfing with Chrome ?

Who could afford or want an Internet without Google search ?

Zamboni




msg:3737638
 7:30 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

Also while working in our adwords accounts sometimes the dropdown area to change the date range is missing.

my mistake, didn't have the tab activated.

tangor




msg:3737663
 7:46 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

Open source or not, it still calls home (for hashes at the moment), but that's not the biggie. Looks like Google is looking for a way to take over the desktop, not just browsing. And they just might have the first tool needed to get 'er done.

I personally won't be changing my browsing habits anytime soon, but I can see the inherent attractiveness of Chrome, Gears, and web apps... which puts it all back in mind to 1980...

"PERSONAL COMPUTER? Who would want a PC when they can use a terminal to access the mainframe? We have the most powerful computer out there...and we control it!" Duh, that disappeared in 1983. Since that time the corporations running Big Iron have been doing their best to get us "users" back to the fold. Cloud computing, the internet, googleness, and all that other stuff is The Way Back.

Average Joe user doesn't care tiddly winks about "computing", They just want their stuff when they want it. The megacorps lusting for control (ie, ability to charge for access, etc) and no tin foil hat on these comments...just an observation what DEC and IBM said way back when is coming around again... should be tickled pink with Chrome! And just for fun, Issac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, and Arthur C Clarke said the same thing about "computing" back in the 1940s-50s!

Quadrille




msg:3737673
 7:58 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

Average Joe user doesn't care tiddly winks about "computing", They just want their stuff when they want it.

That's exactly right; and most of us really don't mind if our browser phones home, either.

I can see all this might be worrying for the Mob, Big Business and Spies.

But, trust me, for most of us, it's a major advance in browsing.

And if bugging my computer means fewer microphones under the wallpaper and fewer CI&A men getting cold watching my home ... I'll take that as a bonus. I guess they will too! ;)

[edited by: Quadrille at 7:59 pm (utc) on Sep. 3, 2008]

Scarecrow




msg:3737706
 8:31 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

One problem is that there is no way to disable JavaScript, or disable images.

Another is that there is no way to keep Chrome from grabbing the standard Google universal cookie, even if you never access a Google site. This is the cookie that expires two years after the last time you landed on some Google site (which means it expires two years after your hard disk is in the dumpster).

Unless you have your home page set to some site of your choosing, Chrome will phone home with a HEAD fetch to grab the standard Google cookie within about ten seconds after loading. If you have a home page set it doesn't do this until you put something into the address/search bar. Then it will phone home with a HEAD to grab a Google cookie, or read that cookie if you already have one. This happens even if you've changed your default search engine to a non-Google engine.

The cookie options are minimal. You can accept all, reject all, or do something mysterious in between that Google doesn't explain, and doesn't allow you to configure.

Try this: With your own home page set, now delete your cookies and exit Chrome. Next, reload Chrome and you won't get a cookie. Before you do anything else, get into the "incognito" window, which is supposed to dump all cookies upon exit. It works, except that Google's own cookie is exempt from this! Google will read its own cookie in incognito mode, or set its cookie if you don't have one, and it stays in Chrome even after you exit the incognito mode. In other words, Google exempts itself from its own privacy features.

You can change the default engine to anything you like, and Wireshark tests indicate that Google doesn't phone home your search terms using its cookie if you change the default engine. But they're ready to do this with a minor automatic update, and someday they will.

All this behavior is with phishing and malware protection disabled, and "show suggestions" disabled, and send usage statistics and crash reports disabled.

The GoogleUpdate.exe program is separate from Chrome, and it tries to access the Internet on every warm boot. Then it hangs around in the process table forever, even if you never load Chrome. Why is this necessary? What is it waiting for? Is it watching you?

StoutFiles




msg:3737711
 8:37 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

What would happen, if Google decide to keep their search only available for users surfing with Chrome ?

That's when Cuil would strike! Muahaha.

Bddmed




msg:3737714
 8:41 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

Don't you believe it; it takes more than facts to silence the Tin Foil Hat Brigade, and, given the chance, this thread - like every Google thread - will be turned into the same old, same old, same old .... well, you get the point.

So true. I'm off grabbing a cookie now. Just like them.

Why I like Chrome:

I quite like the simplicity and being able to do everything without a large 'chrome'.

Also the active links in the source code is pretty nice. Expanding text areas when you want to.

The inspecting elements option highlighting the elements on the page. All very nice.

And above all. It's speed!

basenotes




msg:3737738
 9:25 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

Matt Cutts on Google having rights to anything you publish via chrome (basically it looks like someone did a copy-and-paste from their standard one...)

Google does not want rights to things you do using Chrome
[mattcutts.com...]

Scarecrow




msg:3737748
 9:42 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

I removed Chrome using the add/remove option in Windows, but the GoogleUpdate.exe doesn't get removed. There is no obvious way to kill that, which continues to phone home to Google with a huge GET request that has your machine configuration and a unique user ID:

/service/check2?appid=%7B430FD4D0-B729-4F61-AA34-91526481799D%7D
&appversion=1.2.131.11&applang=&machine=0&version=1.2.131.11
&machineid=%7B4F599683-B0DE-46F0-A73C-E8A4623C92BD%7D
&userid=%7BAD99E17C-DE6C-4ED7-8FE7-4919642086C7%7D&osversion=5.1
&servicepack=Service%20Pack%202 HTTP/1.1
User-Agent: Google Update/1.2.131.11;winhttp
Host: cr-tools.clients.google.com
Connection: Keep-Alive
Cache-Control: no-cache
Pragma: no-cache

Fortunately, I set a restore point before I installed Chrome, so I was able to revert to that restore point. Google's installation program doesn't set a restore point before it installs, unlike most responsible Windows packages.

I suspect this is all deliberate. When you uninstall Chrome, Google asks you why. I suspect that GoogleUpdate.exe, which sends off all that info on a warm boot and currently gets back empty content, can be set to show a nagging reminder that everything you didn't like about Chrome is all fixed now, and wouldn't you like to install it again?

No thanks.

Quadrille




msg:3737757
 9:58 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

From: googlesystem.blogspot.com [googlesystem.blogspot.com] (A reliable source on Google developments).

Like most other browsers, Google Chrome has some special pages that show information about memory usage, cached files, plug-ins and more. Here's a list of the most interesting about: pages available in Google Chrome (you can open them by dragging about:name to the address bar).

1. about:version - Google Chrome shows the version number the browser, WebKit and V8 (JavaScript engine). You can also find the user-agent used by Google Chrome:

Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 6.0; en-US) AppleWebKit/525.19 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/3.1 Safari/525.19

2. about:plugins - the list of plug-ins that are available in Google Chrome: Shockwave Flash, RealPlayer etc.

3. about:cache - a list of all the web pages cached by Google Chrome. The browser doesn't have an option to limit the cache's size, so it's recommended to regularly empty the cache.

4. about:memory - this pages compares the memory used by all the active browsers and by Google Chrome's tabs.

5. about:stats - a list of internal counters and timers that has a funny subtitle "Shhh! This page is secret!".

6. about:histograms - a list of histograms for Google Chrome's internal metrics.

7. about:dns - Google Chrome prefetches the DNS records for 10 frequently visited hostnames. This feature can be disabled in Options > Under the Hood by unchecking "Use DNS pre-fetching to improve page load performance".

8. about:network - this page could be used for I/O tracking and it's a partial replacement for the Live HTTP Headers extension. Click on "Start I/O tracking", open a web page in a new tab and you'll get a list of all the images, scripts and objects loaded from that web page.

9. about:crash - crash the active tab. Google Chrome displays the "sad tab" image, followed by this message: "Something went wrong while displaying this webpage. To continue, press Reload or go to another page".

10. about:hang - type this in the address bar of a tab when there's already an active web page to hang the process (this means that the process no longer accepts any signal, but it's still running). The other tabs will continue to work and the active tab can be closed.

11. about:internets - this is an Easter egg that references two popular Internet memes: Internets and Series of tubes.

[edited by: Quadrille at 10:02 pm (utc) on Sep. 3, 2008]

incrediBILL




msg:3737767
 10:24 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

Why I like Chrome:

You forgot that it also sends the paranoids off chirping like crickets and gives the Google bashers something to live for.

Quadrille




msg:3737771
 10:27 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

It's now official: not tin foil hats - they've all upgraded to chrome.

youfoundjake




msg:3737819
 11:22 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

For whatever it's worth, I'm really digging Google Chrome, loads up pages really fast.
A lot less overhead the IE or FF.
You can find that by looking at about:memory in the address bar.
User agent is
Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US) AppleWebKit/525.13 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/0.2.149.27 Safari/525.13

Watch ur logs...

incrediBILL




msg:3737821
 11:24 pm on Sep 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

BTW, for all those crying foul about the EULA, it's just Google's general terms of service.

See #11. Content license from you
[google.com...]

This might even cover CACHE pages in the search engine in their eyes, who knows.

You've all be agreeing to these terms for every service you sign up for with Google to date so why is it such a shock now?

Ah, because nobody read those terms did they?

akreider




msg:3737920
 2:23 am on Sep 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

The javascript is very fast. I've got a project with 5000 markers on Google Maps. Chrome is around five times faster than Firefox 2 in displaying markers. Maybe more.

amznVibe




msg:3737995
 5:09 am on Sep 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

akreider, could you try it in Firefox 3.1beta-pre and me know if it's just as fast?

amznVibe




msg:3737998
 5:13 am on Sep 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

I removed Chrome using the add/remove option in Windows, but the GoogleUpdate.exe doesn't get removed. There is no obvious way to kill that, which continues to phone home to Google with a huge GET request that has your machine configuration and a unique user ID

This can also be disabled with What AutoRuns [webmasterworld.com] and then you can kill the GoogleUpdate.exe in the taskmanager. Then you can delete the GoogleUpdate folder entirely. Nasty eh? Google Gears does the same thing.

Bddmed




msg:3738070
 8:31 am on Sep 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

Google changed the EULA.

Chapter 11 now reads:

11. Content license from you

11.1 You retain copyright and any other rights you already hold in Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services.

[google.com...]

Zagek




msg:3738142
 10:50 am on Sep 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

The browser is very clean and I cannot wait for plugins to be released.

It is also good news to hear that they have removed the much discussed controversial passage from the Google Chrome terms and conditions.

frontpage




msg:3738226
 1:13 pm on Sep 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

And you use Chrome without paying Google a cent, point?

Google already uses all your web pages (cache) without paying you a cent, point?

Why would we pay Google to use Chrome?

They are offering Chrome as a freeware product to entice users to use more of their services to click on Adwords.

Why would Google go through the expense of developing a new browser?

1) By pass Firefox, Safari, IE and cut out the middleman.

2) Control methods for disabling Adwords. Get rid of pesky ways to stopping javascript/cookies/image bugs/etc that are available on other browsers.

3) Personal data bonanza. Get viewing habits data for free direct from the end user's uniquely identified browser without having to do it via javascript with Adwords/Google Analytics/tracking cookies/images.

4) Cut out the competition like Hotmail with a bundled browser for other monetized platforms like Gmail.

5) Get rid of pesky people like me who use NoScript/AdblockPlus/Hostman who never see an Adword/Doubleclick/CommissionJunction type ad nor allow any cookies to be set.

Boy, we should really pay for all that... LOL.

I did pay for a browser once, it was called Netscape when it came in a box back in the day. JMHO.

This 241 message thread spans 9 pages: < < 241 ( 1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9 > >
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