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Inserting Images in a Word File
Optimising techniques?
contentmaster




msg:3474952
 3:09 pm on Oct 11, 2007 (gmt 0)

A friend of mine wants some help on a word file that needs updation. The file contains a lot of text as well as many images. The task is to optimise the images which are already in the file and add new ones, while making sure that the total file size is kept to a minimum.

Should we work on each image in photoshop and save each file at a resolution that reduces its size to the minimum?

What other steps can be taken when a file contains a lot of images and the aim is not to compromise too much on quality and clarity while reducing the file size to the maximum?

When should an image be saved as a jpeg or gif? These are colorful pictures.

Newbie question that need answers....When images are put in a word file and the word document is saved and emailed, where are the images saved? Say I send a word file with images to my friend via email, do I also need to email all the images separately?

WOuld appreciate a response and some help

 

limbo




msg:3475040
 4:19 pm on Oct 11, 2007 (gmt 0)

Word embeds the images - no linked files.

There's a setting in Word (and PowerPoint) that let's you optimise the image within the document: on the picture tool bar there is a tool called 'compress image' (picture with arrows pointing at it's corners) - You can apply it to all pictures in a document or just a selection - you can change resolution for screen (92dpi) and also delete cropped areas from images - handy for screen shots.

Of you could batch process all your images before you insert them...

rocknbil




msg:3475525
 2:34 am on Oct 12, 2007 (gmt 0)

contentmaster, have you considered exporting the file as a PDF before deployment?

This would allow a few distinct advantage offer emailing a word file:
- optimization - addressing your first concern, PDF files will be smaller than any Word document that created them - far smaller.
- Universal - Everyone will see your content as you designed it, often the text and images will flow very differently in a Word document opened on different systems. Also not *everyone* has your version of Word - it's entirely possible the recipient may not even be able to see it.
- Uneditable - If you have Acrobat Standard or Pro, you can set password protection to keep the document from being altered or content extracted.
- Bookmarks - You can create a table of contents on the side that will hyperlink to specific views on large documents.
- Annotation - You can add notes, like "post-it stickies" as the document goes from one person to the next (may need Standard or Pro for this, not sure.)

contentmaster




msg:3475827
 12:09 pm on Oct 12, 2007 (gmt 0)

There's a setting in Word (and PowerPoint) that let's you optimise the image within the document: on the picture tool bar there is a tool called 'compress image'

Does that mean I don't need to go into photoshop at all. The images can be optimised and I can even crop the images to make then the same size?

What about any new images that I add to the word document? Can I do the same thing there as well?

contentmaster, have you considered exporting the file as a PDF before deployment?

I do have Primo PDF and I plan to convert the finished document into a PDF file. However, as of now, the requirement is to make the word document manageable so that it can be emailed in full and parts of it can be emailed separately ie, copy pasted into my email.

Another question - Are tables recommended while creating text and image layouts in word so that they can be emailed without losing their alignment?

limbo




msg:3475834
 12:26 pm on Oct 12, 2007 (gmt 0)

Does that mean I don't need to go into photoshop at all. The images can be optimised and I can even crop the images to make then the same size?

What about any new images that I add to the word document? Can I do the same thing there as well?

Yes, and yes. :)

contentmaster




msg:3475836
 12:28 pm on Oct 12, 2007 (gmt 0)

A few more questions please.....

1) The images presently seen in the word document are clear and bright. However, when I copy them and paste it in photoshop, they look pixelated and smudged...what it wrong? Why can't I see them at the same resolution?

2) Suppose the resolution of the pictures are set at Print - 200 dpi...however, I only need them for Web / Screen...should I first compress all the pictures to Web/Screen ie 96 dpi and then copy paste them in photoshop to reduce their size etc?

3) Images saved in PNG format have a much higher file size as compared with jpg. When are png images used and preferable to jpg?

limbo




msg:3475940
 2:36 pm on Oct 12, 2007 (gmt 0)

answers:

1) Don't copy and paste the images direct from Word - if you want to retrieve the images from a word file you need to save the file as a webpage - this will create a directory that you can pull the full size images from.

2) If you compress through word you don't need to open Photoshop - amazingly it doesn't do a bad job.

3) PNG has different applications - it's got the ability to save layers, so for instance, you can edit them in Fireworks + you can use PNG's to support Alpha Transparency with a few tweaks for IE. I'd recommended GIF's and JPG's for what you describe though - no real need for a PNG.

thecoalman




msg:3477518
 4:35 am on Oct 15, 2007 (gmt 0)

When should an image be saved as a jpeg or gif?

Depends on the content of the image.

.gif should be used for images with large areas of a single color, where there is text and you don't need a big color palette. You won't get the artifacts common to .jpg images around edges, for example it would be ideal for taking a screenshot of this forum. The text edges will be preserved perfectly and it will also produce a smaller file. Basically if you don't need a lot of color and want to preserve edges it's perfect. Icons, buttons... Gif also has the ability to be transparent and animate, you can't do that with .jpg.

.jpg should be used for image where you need a large color palette such as people, nature etc.

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