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Call to Action
experiences, results...good & bad
Hubie




msg:3202356
 12:51 am on Dec 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

For awhile we had ads running that head good Headline, and L1 & L2 that clicked through beyond our expectations. Ad spend got real high, with not a ton of sales. I read a lot (in this forum) about using a "Call to Action" to cut down on bum clicks and increase ROI.

I'm in the process of doing this now, and I have a question.

1. Where should the call to action be? L1? L2? Obviously not in the headline...or obviously IN the headline?!
2. Include a price/dollar amount? (lets assume it's a unique product and you're not competing on price). Will including price increase a 'clickers' willingness to buy? Or does it just scare away 'potential' clicks turned buyers? Example: Buy Widgets for $3.00. versus Buy Widgets today.
2.a. If yes to the price question...include numbers or words? (widgets only $3.00 versus widgets only 3 dollars or widgets only 3 bucks)
2.b. Include a price AND a call to action? (example: Widgets for $3.00 Buy now! versus Widgets for $3.00.
3. Do 'buy now!' and/or 'sign-up now' in your ad really increase ROI? I know everyone's campaign is a little different, but is this a no-no in the world of ad writing or is this the golden rule?

Hubie the Nubie

 

meg8




msg:3206699
 11:47 am on Jan 3, 2007 (gmt 0)

Shame there's been no reply to this, I'd be interested to read any thoughts.

DoctorDoctor




msg:3206712
 12:06 pm on Jan 3, 2007 (gmt 0)

I'd go for 2b, hopefully most clicks would be buyers that the price suits them right. Maybe you add if shipment is included etc.

engine




msg:3206728
 12:33 pm on Jan 3, 2007 (gmt 0)

In my experience as a buyer, it's not always the lowest price that attracts.

If I want it now, then shipping/delivery may be more important. Service and quality are prime movers for me.

So, experiment with differing ads, some showing price, some showing "shipping today", some showing brand names, etc. After you've run at least a 1000 impressions you should start to see a pattern developing. Don't just look at clicks, look at how many of which type actually placed an order, ie ROI. Keep experimenting, and the best ads are the ones to keep.

Obviously, it does depend upon what the product or service might be, and what the buyers requirements might be.

For sure, a call to action does help, but, as a buyer, would be wasted in the title.

Hubie




msg:3208904
 3:53 am on Jan 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

bumpity bump. let's keep these ideas coming. Good topic

mimmo




msg:3208914
 4:01 am on Jan 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

I think it depends a lot on how much you pay per click, your conversion rate and your market strategy.

If you are paying a lot for clicks (proportionally to your product price), you obviuosly only want real potential buyers: showing the price can help keeping casual visitors away.

On the other hand, if your clicks are relatively cheap, you may want to prioritize the amount of visitors you get.

When the price is shown, your CTR will be lower, which may result in lower placement and eventually higher cost to keep in the top positions.

I saw some advertisers paying ads and offering free products. I guess this would be good if you are looking for branding.

jtara




msg:3209015
 7:30 am on Jan 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

2b.

I resisted mightily the tired "buy now". But it works.

Price is useful, if only to filter-out those who are shopping for the lowest price, and will just be disappointed and go elsewhere after clicking and seeing that you don't have the lowest price. Put it right in the ad. If they don't like the price, they won't click, saving you money.

RockSolidWes




msg:3209767
 8:49 pm on Jan 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

I'd ask yourself a question first. What sets you apart from your competition. Possible answers include:

1) We have it in stock (e.g. PlayStation 3)
2) Excellent Customer Service (e.g. no questions asked return policy)
3) Incentives & Rebates (e.g. Free Shipping)
4) Large Selection

I'd highlight what sets you apart in a fairly large icon or graphic throughout your site -- then create ads that match that slant that sets you apart.

Example:

Buy Widgets: $3.00
Buy 4, Get Free Shipping in USA.
Browse Inventory. Buy Now.

QualityNonsense




msg:3211977
 10:52 am on Jan 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

If you are paying a lot for clicks (proportionally to your product price), you obviuosly only want real potential buyers: showing the price can help keeping casual visitors away.

Exactly. Putting a price in the ad can cut out the dud leads. Say there are two types of widget in your industry: standard and premium. Premium cost 10x standard widgets. By putting "From $1000" in your ad copy, you'll slash the number of clicks you get from standard widget shoppers.

The downside? You're giving away your trump card before the user has had the full sales patter on why they should go premium. As with anything, I'd experiment with both (and track ROI, not just CTR).

lets assume it's a unique product and you're not competing on price).

In that case, I'd be inclined to *not* quote price. But test everything.

I resisted mightily the tired "buy now". But it works.

Much like myself. Again, I believe it filter out the browsers and timewasters. But don't forget to test the alternatives, like:

- order now
- join now
- sign up now
- save now

etc. I think you'll be surprised how much of an impact this can have. The call to action traditionally goes at the end of the ad (ie. they're read the copy, now do what I want).

If yes to the price question...include numbers or words

Again, test. I'd put money on the figures getting higher CTR. Remember, anything that impacts readability impacts CTR.

Finally, do please let us know how you get along. Always interesting to hear other's experiences.

QualityNonsense




msg:3211981
 10:55 am on Jan 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

PS. I'd also look at what your competition is doing. Then I'd test the same call to action/USP as them (eg. 'Cheapest prices around') as well as the polar opposite (eg. 'Highest quality guaranteed').

You might find that it pays to stand out.

kea12345




msg:3212464
 8:25 pm on Jan 8, 2007 (gmt 0)

In terms of calls to action, I once tried, "Do Not Buy Stuff From Me".

Reverse Psychology for the Web Savvy. Turns out, it worked beautifully.

Or, I should say it *didn't* work. ;-)

meg8




msg:3219600
 10:06 am on Jan 15, 2007 (gmt 0)

That was a great set of replies, thank you. It always surprises me how stuff that seems sooo obvious when I read it here just doesn't occur to me, until I read it here!

My top secret special word which I shouldn't share is:

friendly

works really well for my web nervous buyers.

trannack




msg:3219651
 11:15 am on Jan 15, 2007 (gmt 0)

"In terms of calls to action, I once tried, "Do Not Buy Stuff From Me".
Reverse Psychology for the Web Savvy. Turns out, it worked beautifully. "

I have also tried using very bizarre wording in adverts - and sure enough curiosity killed the cat. However, this was some time back, and I feel sure that if I tried tha same tactic now, that QS would come into play.

Call to action works extremely well. Tell them what you have at what price and how/when you can supply it. This will reduce the time-wasters.

However, if your product sells based on your sales speel on your landing page, then you will start to reduce your sales. Its a fine balance, and as you said in your opening post, every site is different. I would suggest you run about 4 ads at the same time for about 1 month to really assess the traffic trends and CTR.

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