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Venting About New Adwords Landing Page Algorithm.
narsticle

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 2:58 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

Hi all,

i would just like to vent about the new adwords landing page algorithm. I feel that the algorithm is unfair to lead generation campaigns and interferes with an advertisers ability to do business. If you are paying for an ad, as long as the webpage you are sending a visitor to is relevent, Google should not interfere with the campaign. Here is what happened to me.

The ad ran something like this (this is generic)

Name of Client
Register for special pricing.
Offer expires 7/31/06

The landing page then took the user to a page that said register for special pricing with a form to fill out and register for the special pricing which then took the user to a page where they could see the pricing. No tricks, no gimmicks, what the ad says is what the user gets. Why is google interfering?

Very annoyed.

 

narsticle

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 3:00 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

As an addendum to the initial post this is what the clients ad group said:

25 keyword(s) are currently inactive for search.
These keywords are marked in the Status column of the Keywords tab below. Improve their quality through optimization, delete them, or raise the keywords' maximum CPCs to the minimum bids indicated. (Raising the bids to at least the minimum will activate the keywords.) [?]

The campaign has been running since friday and yet the keywords had over 1% CTR's. All the keywords now had minimum bids of $5-$10 to reactivate.

syber

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 3:02 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

Why is google interfering?

because they can

ScottG13

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 3:13 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

It's Google's medium and if they have decided they don't like affiliates, that's just how it is.

I guess the solution is to not be an affiliate.

narsticle

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 3:21 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

It's Google's medium and if they have decided they don't like affiliates, that's just how it is.
I guess the solution is to not be an affiliate.

Who said anything about being an affiliate? This is a lead generation campaign for a client not any type of affiliate program whatsoever.

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 3:30 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

If you are paying for an ad, as long as the webpage you are sending a visitor to is relevent, Google should not interfere with the campaign.

This is an age-old conflict. Advertisers nearly always feel that "the customer is always right," but media set standards to protect their image, their user experience, and the value of the space, time, or clicks that they sell.

Consider one obvious example: Many U.S. newspapers won't take ads for movies rated NC-17, no matter how discreet or respectable the ads might be. An NC-17 movie may be legal, and it may even be a great work of art that has been blessed by Roger Ebert and THE NEW YORK TIMES, but the newspapers decline ads for the movie because of the "landing page" (i.e., what users will see when they get to the movie theatre).

Your client may not be selling NC-17 movies, but the same principle applies. The advertising seller has set a standard, and as a practical matter, whether that standard is enforceable depends on the law of supply and demand.

jtara

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jtara us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 3:47 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

Your client may not be selling NC-17 movies, but the same principle applies.

Not at all.

A newspaper will TELL the theatre that they don't accept advertising for NC-17 movies. That way, the theatre knows not to waste their time trying to advertise NC-17 movies, and at the same time, doesn't walk away in disgust and advertise NO movies because they can't figure out what the newspaper's policy is.

I've never heard of a newspaper accepting an "unacceptable" ad for 10 times the price.

narsticle

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 3:53 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

I've never heard of a newspaper accepting an "unacceptable" ad for 10 times the price.

Exactly. The whole policy seems like a scap to get higher bid prices. If an ad is bad and the landing page isnt converting Google should allow the principles of free market to weed that advertiser out. How long can an advertiser with an innapropriate or bad landing page actually advertise if they are getting a low conversion rate? Not for very long and hense that advertiser would weed themselves out or increase their quality. Google should have no part in determining bid price or quality if they want to base their billing on an auction system.

Khensu

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 4:53 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

You are putting the cart before the horse.

I block sites like this one constantly.

You need to show the pricing and then have the email form and say "if you would like more info blah blah"

If I can't get to an example(s) of your offer without giving up my info that is a "bad user experience"

Your pricing could suck and now I have given up my info.

netmeg

WebmasterWorld Senior Member netmeg us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 5:08 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

The whole policy seems like a scap to get higher bid prices.

I don't think Google is fooling themselves that that many people are going to pay the higher bid prices. I think they're trying to push out the types of pages, sites and businesses they just plain don't want to be advertising on their search engine. They would much rather you made changes to your site, or your business model, or just went away. But rather than ban you entirely, you can pay some astronomical rate per click; presumably while you're working on your site, so as not to drop off completely. Or you can pay some astronomical rate and NOT work on your site - in which case, I shouldn't be at all surprised if that astronomical rate kept going up and up and up until you either comply or drop out.

That's what I'm thinking is going on.

narsticle

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 5:23 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

at the same time they should be leaving this to the advertiser to decide. We were getting a very good conversion rate.

bcc1234

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 5:30 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

Actually, I agree with the original poster.

I have a newsletter that promote with PPC. And the landing page is basically a signup page. It explains what the newsletter is about, the frequency of mailings, and the privacy policy.

When I called Google about the increase in bids, they said that I need to display more content and provide users with the information before asking them to sign up. That really defeats the purpose of having a newsletter. If I wanted an informational website I would run one. But in that case, I wouldn't be able to spend four figures a month promoting it through adwords and simply settle for the free search engine traffic, just like most others in my niche do.

Oh, and the creative says that it's a newsletter and that you can sign up to receive it. So it's as relevant to the content of the page as it gets.

Google definitely hasn't considered all possible implications of their changes.

rbacal



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 5:34 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

at the same time they should be leaving this to the advertiser to decide. We were getting a very good conversion rate.

Why? I have yet to see any explanation of why google "should" do what you want them to, when it is counter to their own financial and long term interests.

And, I might add that a lot of people have been riding a train on very cheap tickets, while others on the very same train have been paying a LOT more for the ride.

Why "should" someone, let's say you, pay 3 cents a click when there may be others paying $8.00 a click? (that's the range in some of the niches I'm in).

I understand why YOU might want that (that's fair), but why "should" google continue to offer you the bargain, when they can maximize the spends and loyalty of businesses with much better, long term business models? And, at the same time get rid of at least some sites that are fraudulent, misleading, and annoying.

Anyway, if you are that good at indicating what google "should" do, then perhaps they'll have a lucrative job or pay you for the advice.

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 5:46 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

at the same time they should be leaving this to the advertiser to decide. We were getting a very good conversion rate.

What does your conversion rate have to do with Google's protecting its "user experience"?

Let's say, just for the sake of discussion, that you (meaning the generic or universal "you") have a landing page with nothing but boilerplate sell copy and an order button. You have a conversion rate of 10%. That means 90% of the people who see that landing page aren't buying anything. Are those users having a positive "user experience" when they visit that landing page? Probably not. Does their experience with that landing page make them more inclined or less inclined to click AdWords ads in the future? The answer to that question may not matter to you, the advertiser, but we can assume with some degree of confidence that it does matter to Google.

LifeinAsia

WebmasterWorld Administrator lifeinasia us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 6:26 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

they said that I need to display more content and provide users with the information before asking them to sign up.

Why not just include a sample of a past newsletter (or at least part of one) to show people what it's like? It should make Google happy and it will give potential subscribers a better idea of what to expect.

ronmcd

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 6:39 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

europeforvisitors, it still doent make sense. What if the phrase which was typed into google.com was "buy green widget"? And the landing page is specifically designed to sell you a green widget. Even then conversions may only be 1%, or 5%, depedns on the product. But it's exactly what they were looking for, you cant say cos 90% didnt buy they didnt find what they were looking for.

If that same site redesigned the landing page to conform to googles new guidelines (assuming that were possible), lots of content, background, history of green widgets etc etc, their conversion rate may make it impossible to stay in profit. What happens then? Noone advertises for that search phrase because its not profitable. How is that serving the visitors who want to buy with relevant content?

No, I tell a lie, there are still advertisers - ebay, parked domains etc. Fantastic relevant content they are providing.......

aeiouy

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 6:41 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

You are putting the cart before the horse.

I block sites like this one constantly.

You need to show the pricing and then have the email form and say "if you would like more info blah blah"

If I can't get to an example(s) of your offer without giving up my info that is a "bad user experience"

Your pricing could suck and now I have given up my info.

From another review elsewhere, I believe this is the case. Google does not consider an e-mail form to get more information a friendly experience. Provide some information relative to the keywords and then try to ask for the information. Placing it as a roadblock is a bad user experience for most people.

I know some don't care and it is only about their own conversions, but Google has to care because enough of those bad experiences and the visitors go elsewhere.

I think this is a clearcut example of how something can be improved and SHOULD be improved.

Some of you have to stop treating non-interested visitors like they are disposable. There is not a limitless supply of human beings interested in your keywords, in most cases.

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 3021482 posted 7:55 pm on Jul 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

What if the phrase which was typed into google.com was "buy green widget"? And the landing page is specifically designed to sell you a green widget.

That's a good point, and maybe it's something that the algorithm should address. Maybe certain keywords such as "buy" should trigger a different calculation of the quality score for the landing page.

Then again, maybe not, depending on what kind of data Google has available on the user experience. A searcher who wants to buy something may be looking for more information than he'd find on an order page even if he's searching on "buy green widget." DoubleClick's 2005 study, "SEARCH BEFORE THE PURCHASE: Understanding Buyer Search Activity as it Builds to Online Purchase" [doubleclick.com] may be illuminating, and it may show why Google thinks the "user experience" is important even for queries like "buy green widget."

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