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My 30 day experiment - no log on to AdSense
What were my findings?
frakilk




msg:3540275
 11:51 am on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

Hi all,

After the October stress I decided at the start of December to not log in to my AdSense account for a period of 30 days. My findings:

- Earnings: Better than I would have expected for my niche in December but I don't believe it was directly related to not logging in.

- Time saved: Lots! After a few days into the experiment gone was the compulsion to check the account numerous times a day.

- Stress levels: The biggest reason this experiment was a success had to be the lack of worrying what was going on in my account from day to day. At the end of the 30 days I began to feel very silly about any emotional investment I had previously made into the account. Some days are way up, some days are way down and others are average. Looking at your account on an hourly/daily basis can STRESS you out.

So will I continue the experiment? Yes indeedy. I'm already into my second 30 day period.

If you want to try this experiment I would strongly suggest that you check out WebmasterWorld for any important AdSense developments that require you to log into your account.

Good luck!

 

zett




msg:3540278
 12:04 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

The biggest reason this experiment was a success had to be the lack of worrying what was going on in my account from day to day.

I am down to revenue levels where I hardly worry about the development of Adsense revenues any longer. :-(

Some days are way up, some days are way down and others are average.

Yeah, especially December was an extreme rollercoaster, the highest high:low ratio ever (highest variance ever).

So will I continue the experiment? Yes indeedy. I'm already into my second 30 day period.

And next we should try doing the same with WebmasterWorld. Imagine not logging on here for a week or so... <g,d+r>

vivalasvegas




msg:3540343
 2:33 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

I agree - checking stats several times a day "helps" you waste a lot of time and generates a lot of stress. However, a month may be too long. My rule is to check stats once a week. Who knows, something important may happen, something I wouldn't wanna miss.

pageoneresults




msg:3540349
 2:40 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

Man, I haven't logged into my AdSense account for at least a couple of months (I'm sure I have a ton of "New Features" and other stuff to dismiss). Nothing to see there other than the daily grind. ;)

farmboy




msg:3540378
 3:04 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

I also made some changes back in December.

1. I decided that once you have the basics covered, all the tweaking, testing, etc. aren't worth the results (if any) - there are just too many factors not in the control of the publishers.

2. I haven't created any new channels since sometime in early December. I've created new ads for new pages, but no channels.

3. I now only view URL channels when I check my earnings report.

4. I haven't added any new URL's to my filter since December. I saw a few ads that were obviously written to take a visitor to a MFA page of some type, but I just left them alone.

5. I didn't go 30 days without checking reports like the OP, but I've probably only been checking about once per week on average.

Results: The end of December and early January were great from an EPC perspective. I don't think my changes had anything to do with that, but it seems to reinforce #1 above.

FarmBoy

explorador




msg:3540544
 5:40 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

The lows of Dec caused me lots of stress trying to find out what was wrong. "US logging into ADSense reports" should generate a lot of load on the servers huh? I was trying to find a way to receive a daily report on my email or via sms into my phone about my daily earnings.

I want to quit worrying but I think staying informed should let me know of any problems "on time"... "right?". I'll try to stay off the reports for a while :(

</paranoid>I hope this won't cause any problems</paranoid>

CentennialEmpire




msg:3540569
 6:03 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

If you're running your website like a business you need to check your stats daily, if not several times a day. As with any business, you need to be on the ball and able to react virtually on the fly to changes taking place in your market.

For hobby sites or for individuals who do not rely on Adsense for their income not checking the stats may be fine, but for others it's not a choice. But you're certainly right in that it leads to stress!

ecmedia




msg:3540601
 6:38 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

There is no one good answer and I agree with CentennialEmpire that it all depends on where you are with AdSense. As an executive for a firm that makes six figure income with AdSense, waiting for 30 days is out of question. Actually, we monitor the data on 2-hour intervals to plan our strategy. But if all you make is a a few bucks a day I agree that once a month makes perfect sense.

BigDave




msg:3540603
 6:42 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

If you're running your website like a business you need to check your stats daily, if not several times a day.

No you don't. Just because you do it, doesn't mean that everyone has to. That is the equivalent of micromanaging and just leads to wasted time, especially since there is really nothing you can do about it with almost any the problems that you can find from logging in.

farmboy




msg:3540605
 6:47 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

No you don't. Just because you do it, doesn't mean that everyone has to. That is the equivalent of micromanaging and just leads to wasted time, especially since there is really nothing you can do about it with almost any the problems that you can find from logging in.

I tend to agree with the above. What problems can a publisher find by logging in to AdSense where the publisher can do something about the problem and the problem would need to be corrected quickly?

FarmBoy

CentennialEmpire




msg:3540624
 7:08 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

If you have a large site with varied content and content styling, adapting ads and studying the effects is a daily routine. We review bigger changes on a weekly basis and watching our statistics as things happen is integral to tweaking Adsense to make as much profit from it as possible.

Within a day whatever changes we make will be statistically significant given our traffic, therefore we NEED to monitor changes and make subtle tweaks to see what differences, if any, they make. If what we introduced doesn't fare well over a few days, we start planning for larger changes to be implemented a day or two later. Logging in and studying the statistics is integral to ensure larger changes are positive for us and not obstructions to earnings.

For the majority of publishers a few ads planted in a few parts of the page are enough, and off they go. You could check a year later and it wouldn't be an issue, but it is for us. I can assure you that if you took a passive attitude to Adsense on a large and varied site you'd be cutting your earnings by a significant margin.

[edited by: CentennialEmpire at 7:10 pm (utc) on Jan. 4, 2008]

netchicken1




msg:3540632
 7:36 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

As an aside to this experiment, I have been on holiday for the last 2 weeks and not added to my site at all.

Over the time the ecpm plummeted to quite low levels - 1/2 normal. This could be entirely owing to the Christmas / new Year season.

However yesterday was the first day I worked on the site and today my ecpm has returned to its pre chritmas levels.

I wonder if making changes to your site registers with google who reward updated content with higher paying adverts?

BigDave




msg:3540653
 8:15 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

You could check a year later and it wouldn't be an issue, but it is for us.

And I can assure you that there are very serious business people that spend their time producing varied content on their large site, and find that to be the best use of their time.

Again, just because you think it's important doesn't mean that it is necessary to a successful business.

Of course you need to pay attention if you are always experimenting and fiddling. I would do the same. But I don't do that anymore because I like the general look of my site as it is, and every other variation that I tried either gave worse results than the current layout, or was embarassing in how it pushed ads in the user's faces.

As I care about the site's reputation, and not just maximizing short term profits, I'm satisfied with reasonable profits and concentrating on the content side of the equation. Whether you choose to believe it or not, people can be serious about their business and operate differently than you. I'm even willing to bet that many of them take home more money than you do as well.

explorador




msg:3540667
 8:36 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

Good Business: don't take anything for granted. Keep an eye on your stuff cause while you where away the little ant was studying your niche... and after a month you find out, only to see the little ant one month ahead of you. (positioning on SE, rankings, links and so...)

MY POINT (IMHO) why caring about a website, or traffic if doesn't mean earnings? I don't mean anything should produce money, but "heavy and costly hobby" to maintain a website and not worrying about its performance.

* Sure, everybody has the right to do what they want :) (even if that means lots of threads on WW about "why are my earnings down? explain me please!")

LifeinAsia




msg:3540671
 8:52 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

What problems can a publisher find by logging in to AdSense where the publisher can do something about the problem and the problem would need to be corrected quickly?

Having a bug in the latest code update that prevented AdSense from showing. Granted, someone would probably notice the problem eventually, but you are more likely to find something like that quicker if you are monitoring your stats regularly. And granted, you should be checking all pages affected by any type of code update. Buyt we all know that sometimes sites become monsters and a code change here may cascade into a problem on other pages that you've forgottten also access that code.

CentennialEmpire




msg:3540712
 9:43 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

BigDave, it appears as though you agree with me.

Yes, publishers can leave their Adsense settings alone for long periods while others can tweak their ads on a regular basis and continuously monitor results. Each publishers' situation is different and in our case daily monitoring is a must. You challenged my response when I stated why we check our stats daily, so I fired back. I don't understand why that makes me automatically discount anybody elses way of monitoring their stats, but I digress.

I think you're also jumping to unfair conclusions by suggesting publishers who tweak their ads are out there solely for the money or stuffing ads to annoy users. That's an unfair statement and in our case doesn't apply at all. The trick to success with adsense IMHO is to adapt ads into the design and make their presence welcome or at the very least not distractive to visitors. Feeling guilty about ad placement defeats the entire purpose of having them in the first place for most publishers.

Now to add some more ingredients into the mix, if Adsense works like the stock market, which many individuals believe it actually does given the live buying and selling of ads world-wide, some publishers believe monitoring that stock market is prudent. Newspapers publish daily stock values so investors can track their stocks during breakfast, and Adsense publishes stats so their publishers can do the same. Nothing wrong with doing it and certainly no harm should come to those who believe in regular monitoring.

[edited by: CentennialEmpire at 9:49 pm (utc) on Jan. 4, 2008]

potentialgeek




msg:3540713
 9:46 pm on Jan 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

Adsense checking = Site monitoring.

Up-time hosting guarantees mean nothing. The losers won't tell you if/when your site was down, or for how long. I once lost more Adsense revenue than the cost of an entire year of hosting b/c the site went down.

Get an auto checker for your system tray = all of the info, none of the time wasting.

p/g

"The price of freedom is eternal vigilance."

inactivist




msg:3543722
 4:02 am on Jan 9, 2008 (gmt 0)

And next we should try doing the same with WebmasterWorld. Imagine not logging on here for a week or so... <g,d+r>

Already doing that. Nothing much changes. :D

explorador




msg:3549732
 3:03 pm on Jan 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

DONT STOP MONITORING YOUR WEBSITES if you care about them or if they are worth something.

I had one site hacked and guess what, I realize about it via adsense reports showing LESS impressions on that site that day. Nor the visitors or the hosting company will tell you fast enough.

Nobody will tell you about an emergency. It is your job to take care of what you build. Nobody will check your site status to say "hey, correct this or that". Few people send you this kind of messages.

farmboy




msg:3549818
 4:25 pm on Jan 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

DONT STOP MONITORING YOUR WEBSITES if you care about them or if they are worth something.

That's good advice, but this thread seems to be about about frequent vs. not-so-frequent logging in to AdSense. You don't need to log in to AdSense to monitor a site.

I'd even go so far as to "if you care about your sites, don't rely on AdSense reports to do your monitoring."

FarmBoy

coachm




msg:3549848
 4:47 pm on Jan 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

Within a day whatever changes we make will be statistically significant given our traffic, therefore we NEED to monitor changes and make subtle tweaks to see what differences, if any, they make. If what we introduced doesn't fare well over a few days, we start planning for larger changes to be implemented a day or two later. Logging in and studying the statistics is integral to ensure larger changes are positive for us and not obstructions to earnings.

Actually, what your wrote above about statistically significant is incorrect under a number of situations, and you are oversimplifying something and repeating an oft repeated myth about numbers.

Actually stat. significance depends on a variety of things, one of which is sample size. However, what's critical here is the unit of analysis that is used and is appropriate for the question being answered with the numbers. (ie. impressions, clicks, ctr, days, weeks, months...and so on).

You may have one million impressions a day, but if your unit of analysis is "day" then the impressions mean nothing. One day is just simply one day.

So theoretically what you are saying is wrong, but worse, practially, I'd bet almost anything that you are making bad decisions based on wrongly interpreted data, on almost a daily basis.

In your case, the volume of traffic is giving you a false sense that your analyses are accurate and following a reasonable scientific approach.

kaz




msg:3550095
 9:19 pm on Jan 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

Didn't stats used to have a longer lag and were from the day before? Ahh - those were the days.

I agree with the basic theory. To me it has to do with how I am spending my time. While I won't go a month, I do think there is only so much I get out of monitoring closely and I earn more money by working on my site's content and improving it. I believe stats are important, but there is a rate of diminishing return. When you get to the 300th time in the month, I'm not sure that it helps provide insight to improve my earnings. Making a new page which adds value to visitors and provides more advertisers with paying customers does help more than ... checking my stats again and again.

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