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AdSense Full-time - Considerations
FourDegreez

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 7:39 pm on Dec 2, 2006 (gmt 0)

It's long been a goal of mine to leave the rat race and earn a living from my web sites. But I don't want to go into it naively. So I thought maybe we could talk about some important points to consider.

How much income is enough? My thinking is that twice what you need to live on is a good goal. That should help offset lean months or unexpected events such as smartpricing or losing your rank.

Plan for additional costs. I think the two biggest for people living in the US are health insurance and full FICA tax. Today I get good health coverage from my employer, and pay the typical half FICA. Health insurance for the self-employed is probably a topic in itself. How to get a good rate?

Diversify. Build up more than one web site. Try not to let a single web site dominate your earnings. Have other income streams, like CJ, Amazon, AdBrite, etc. - they may not earn as much as AdSense, but it's worth the peace of mind.

Diversify more. Instead of spending excess income on plasma TVs and trips to the Bahamas, invest that money in stocks, bonds, real estate, etc. Live beneath your means and invest the rest.

Have a contingency plan. What will you do if your plans go up in smoke? Go into a new business? If so, have money set aside for it. Go back to the cubicle? Keep your skills up to date.

I'm curious about other people's experiences. Who has made the leap and how has it gone? What words of advice do you have?

 

rbacal



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 7:59 pm on Dec 2, 2006 (gmt 0)

2 quick cents. I believe going into ADSENSE full time is exceedingly foolish, but I believe that going into WEB DEVELOPMENT full time is the way to go if you want to jump in.

I've never considered myself or my sites as focused on adsense, and I plan on making money from them from the sites for a long time.

BigDave

WebmasterWorld Senior Member bigdave us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 8:34 pm on Dec 2, 2006 (gmt 0)

I do not have anywhere near the income to be able to claim that I live off my AdSense earnings, but I have lived off wildly fluctuating earnings since the late 80s as a contract programmer. The rules are pretty much the same except that AdSense is even less reliable.

You seem to have a good grasp of what is involved. You no doubt shake your head when you see someone going into a panic attack because they no longer make $1000/day, and talk about going bankrupt.

I think that your "Diversify More" point is the most important one. Ideally, you should be living off your investment income and using your AdSense income to increase your pay.

My ideal is to live off the dividends, and increase the equity through growth and using all my after tax income to increase that equity. I was almost there before the bubble burst in 2000. I'm sticking with more stable investments this time, they weren't extremely high risk, but I was getting a little too greedy trying to reach my retirement funding.

Instead of spending excess income on plasma TVs and trips to the Bahamas

While those sound extravagant, unless they are bought on credit, that isn't where you get into trouble. Yeah, it would be better to invest that money, but where you really get in trouble is when you increase your monthly expenses and your risk of future high expenses.

Buying a nicer house in a higher tax area is a nicer area is a bad plan. You are now free to move to an area with a lower cost of living, if you are going to move, you should consider that option. Do you really want a $10,000 mortgage payment due when Google drops you out of the SERPs for 4 months?

The same goes for your cars. Even if you are paying cash, consider the recurring expenses of your choice. Some vehicles are simply cheaper to own and operate.

I also want to toss in a little warning about rental properties. In general, they are a good investment, but you can find yourself with sudden, large bills to pay. Plan for it. A month with a new roof on one house can turn into a bit of a disaster when you have to replace a water heater and half the plumbing in another and there is a drug raid in the third. Can you afford all those repairs and three empty houses at the same time?

humblebeginnings

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 8:48 pm on Dec 2, 2006 (gmt 0)

I was about to quit my job 3 months ago because my Adsense earnings had exploded. Running my Adsense business took me about twice as much time as keeping the boss happy at my daytime job.
Then some of the recent algo changes hit me and now my online earnings are down to zero. Got my Adsense cash in the bank and yes, I still have my daytime job. So not too bad at all.
But since Google can make or break your Adsense earnings in a split second, I fully agree with the previous members; diversify, diversify more, and I would add; diversify even more.
Do Adsense, YPN, CJ, Shareasale, Clickbank, etcetera.
Open your own webshop, first on e-Bay and then fully independant.
Use your profits to invest in more online activities, park some serious cash on bank accounts and buy some solid Wallstreet stuff.
Buy your own house, buy a vacation home in Florida, buy the local bar or hotel, etcetera. Diversify, diversify, diversify.

trannack

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 9:18 pm on Dec 2, 2006 (gmt 0)

Excellent advice from Humblebegginings. I have been fortunate, and myself and husband are able to live off our adsense earnings. However, I have put in place several other income sources, so that if adsense ever stopped working for us - yes, it would have an effect on our standard of living, but hopefully the other revenue sources bring in enough to cover our day-to-day living costs.

I think diversification is very important - and this is where a lot of people go wrong. For example if you rely on your traffic from adwords to generate your adsense income - try having in place other traffic sources, obviously best of all is good SEO, but set up some MSN/Yahoo stuff. This is time-comsuming compared to adwords, so it is too late when adwords stops working for you - have it in place now.

Check out the other revenue sources for your site(s) - make sure there are other earning structures there apart from adsense.

Good Luck.

FourDegreez

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 10:35 pm on Dec 2, 2006 (gmt 0)

You are now free to move to an area with a lower cost of living, if you are going to move, you should consider that option.

Good advice. This is part of my plan. My wife and I will be moving next year from the Northeast to the South, where homes and taxes are less than 50% what they are in my area. That will help out significantly.

MThiessen

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 11:23 pm on Dec 2, 2006 (gmt 0)


How much income is enough? My thinking is that twice what you need to live on is a good goal. That should help offset lean months or unexpected events such as smartpricing or losing your rank.

I have lived off the web for about 10 years. Your goal in reality is to make as much as possible without getting greedy. NEVER revert to anything blackhat or the like. Your goal should be to maximize revenue to optimal capacity without hurting the visitors experience or your reputation... period

Plan for additional costs. I think the two biggest for people living in the US are health insurance and full FICA tax. Today I get good health coverage from my employer, and pay the typical half FICA. Health insurance for the self-employed is probably a topic in itself. How to get a good rate?

BCBS (blue cross blue shield) has single proprietor group insurance. It is high, in my case 1200+ per month, but worth it, no health questions.

You need an accountant and you need to pay your quarterly taxes without fail, and you need to make sure you are paying enough or over-paying. This helps you avoid penalties come tax time.


Diversify. Build up more than one web site. Try not to let a single web site dominate your earnings. Have other income streams, like CJ, Amazon, AdBrite, etc. - they may not earn as much as AdSense, but it's worth the peace of mind.

Diversity is good but... If you earn MORE in adsense, stick with it primarily. Don't be afraid to use affiliates, or other adsense accepted sources of income. AdBrite and the others are viable options if (God forbid) you get banned, but for now, optimize and mazimize profits.


Diversify more. Instead of spending excess income on plasma TVs and trips to the Bahamas, invest that money in stocks, bonds, real estate, etc. Live beneath your means and invest the rest.

That's the key. Don't let it go to your head. You are the boss. So what if this year you broke 300k? Next year could be 50K so squirrel your money away and pay off all your debts. Save the lamborgini or the beach house for when you can afford to pay cash for it.


Have a contingency plan. What will you do if your plans go up in smoke? Go into a new business? If so, have money set aside for it. Go back to the cubicle? Keep your skills up to date.

Best plan is to diversify your "sources" of income. Multiple quality sites across differnent themes, invest money in things like real-estate (worked well for me) and the stock market (if your up to it)


I'm curious about other people's experiences. Who has made the leap and how has it gone? What words of advice do you have?

Living the dream here, but it is not without stress, stay with it, there is no better boss then YOU but also be aware the "boss" can let you take off to much time from work... hehe if you know what I mean... FEAR COMPLACNENCY it's your worst enemy.

chocorol

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 12:59 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

Well, I think that properties rental is the way to go when trying to invest and diversify. At least where I live, people who are in this bussiness have a really good life. The hard part is to buy the properties (choose the right ones), but after that, things are easier, yeah, I know it involves some hard work to take care of the plumbing and the roofs ;) but, hey! you have a steady income every month and your investment is available if you need it for some emergency just by selling.

Maybe it's not the best option for everyone but it's a nice one for sure.

gregbo

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 1:05 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

Don't forget to factor in the costs of your web operations - web hosting, network connectivity, etc. Also, if you are a single-person operation, you need to set aside some money for part-time backup in case you are ill or otherwise unable to manage your sites.

Jane_Doe

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jane_doe us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 1:42 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

Self employed people do have to pay more FICA, but on the other hand there are some great tax benefits for the self employed. If you set up your own 401K plan or defined contribution plan you may be able to contribute (and tax defer) much more money to your own plan than you can with most corporate retirement plans. Health insurance premiums may also be tax deductible for the self employed.

How much money to save before you leave your full time job depends in part on how long you think it would take you to get another regular job again if for some reason all of your sites got wiped out.

One thing to consider is that having a number of sites in different topic areas, getting income from a variety of programs and traffic from many different sources can sometimes be more secure than working for one company that has plans to lay you off and transfer your job duties to someone in Bangalore.

The Millionaire Next Door is a good book on the habits of people who are often self employed, live well below their means, and are good at saving and investing money.

BigDave

WebmasterWorld Senior Member bigdave us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 2:54 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

There are definite advantages to rental properties, but you have to understand the realities of them. What they tell you in the late night TV infomercials is not the whole story.

I know it involves some hard work to take care of the plumbing and the roofs

More than taking work for the roof and plumbing, it takes money. It takes liquidity. Sometimes you do not have the time to get that loan set up to take care of an emergency plumbing job. Major work also tends to coincide with vacant properties. Money going out while no money is coming in.

Yeah, you can use your credit cards for an emergency, but then you have that debt at credit card interest rates. It is much better to have cash on hand.

but, hey! you have a steady income every month

No, you don't. When you first buy a property, the rent rarely covers all the expenses unless you put in about a 40% down payment. It usually takes about 5-10 years before you have any positive cash flow at all.

Then there is the little problem of vacancies. You could go five years without ever having a unit vacant for more than a month, then a big employer in the area might shut down. There are ways to reduce your exposure, but you cannot eliminate it.

Most people are in it real estate looking to improve their equity position, not get a monthly income. If you hold a property long enough, you may get "a steady income", but not if you need it in the short term.

and your investment is available if you need it for some emergency just by selling.

Real estate is NOT a liquid asset. It can be incredibly difficult, costly and time-consuming to sell. Do not assume that the money is available "just by selling".

Two years ago the houses on either side of mine accepted offers for more than the asking price within 2 days of listing. Now there are three houses in the immediate neighborhood that have been listed for over three months.

One other house, around the corner in the "nice neighborhood" just sold after being on the market for 5 months, for $120k less than it was originally listed for.

Another that is about a block farther has been on the market for 9 months and has dropped in price almost $200k. That is 9 months of mortgage while not living in or renting the house.

Then there is the 7.5% broker's commission when it finally sells.

Real estate can be an excellent investment for building wealth. It can be an excellent source of income after you have owned it for a long time.

Real estate is not so good at providing you a steady income that you can rely upon.

Real estate is not a liquid asset. If you are in real estate, you need more liquid assets to deal with emergencies, not less.

Real estate is not a low risk investment.

The Millionaire Next Door is a good book on the habits of people who are often self employed,

Seconded.

[edited by: BigDave at 2:57 am (utc) on Dec. 3, 2006]

spaceylacie

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 2:59 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

I made the leap, closing down a previous business of mine to become a full time web publisher. This was a shock to my family and earned me a brief stay in a mental institution. They got together and had me committed trying to stop the closure of my successful previous business since some had a financial vested intestest in me keeping the previous company going but they were not willing to support me in my new endeavors. When I told some friends, family... and, finally, doctors that I was no longer going to make money from selling my designs but instead make money by giving them away, most of them thought I was nuts. I'd advise that you don't tell friends/family what you are up to if you decide to go for it. Being ridiculed for your lack of common sense won't help your earnings a bit.

The other advice I have is just be ready for the non-pressure. When you are giving away free info(the type of stuff people used to pay me a pretty penny for) it's easy to get lazy and think, well, it's free, what do they expect? Don't ever lower the quality/quantity of info just because you aren't getting paid directly and immediately for the work. Keep working at it as if you did have a deadline and quality minimums and you will be successful. That's the hard part, staying motivated on a daily basis.

[edited by: spaceylacie at 3:35 am (utc) on Dec. 3, 2006]

obxbound

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 3:34 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

If you take risks, you may still fail. But if you do not take risks you will surely fail. The greatest risk of all is to do nothing.

Go for it - if you don't, you'll ALWAYS wonder "What If..."

Jane_Doe

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jane_doe us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 3:49 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

As far as real estate for an offline investment, the one thing the real estate books rarely factor in is the value of your time when determining your true rate of return compared to other types of investments.

I'm not against buying real estate, and I think it is good to develop diverse streams of income, but even the more pragmatic books on investing in real estate seem to not factor in the opportunity cost of looking at property, reviewing the loan documents, finding tenants, managing the property, etc.

If you are a succesful web or other type of business owner, each hour of time you are not working on your sites can be very expensive, and real estate often takes more time to manage than investments in other area such as mutual funds or real estate investment trusts. Plus the tax deductions get diminished as you reach certain income levels unless you qualify as a real estate professional.

[edited by: Jane_Doe at 3:56 am (utc) on Dec. 3, 2006]

Mistra

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 4:41 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

I am doing Adsense full time for a few years now (i.e. a few months after Adsense started - could've applied earlier but waited for a while out of fear of rejection). I lied to others that I just started because my earning is lesser than those who are doing it part time. No, I cannot even be compared with part timers, because I am earning lesser than those who are creating web site as a hobby.

One day, while I was working with my sites at Starbucks, I overheard someone who was bragging to his friend about how he is making tons of money from Adsense. Then, he shared about an underage little boy that he knew, who is earning a few thousand dollars per month from Adsense. I felt so sad and discouraged, because I am running not ten web sites but more than a hundred and been working so hard sleeping late at night and sometimes sleepless and yet earning very little.

I also overheard a man at the cafe where I was working who told his friend about his smart daughter. According to him, his daughter is earning a few thousand dollars per month from "Google" just by cutting and pasting some contents to her web site. After I heard that conversation, I guess I am not that cool as I thought after all because my Adsense income is just enough to cover for the coffee that I've been drinking daily at Starbucks.

Now, I am seriously thinking about finding a full time webmastering job. I will miss the kind of lifestyle I've been living for the past few years, especially working at cafes, looking cool with my WiFi notebook. I should be happy if I can get a webmastering job as I can still manage my sites while working for others because for the past 5 years I have laid the foundation. All I need to do now is to add a little content to my sites on daily basis and to do some SEO. Google has been very unkind towards my web sites. :D

If you want to do it full time, please make sure that you have enough money to support you or your family. Don't just rely on Adsense. Give all your heart out to what you are going to do. Don't hold back. Love your job. In Adsense terms, I can be considered a big time failure but that doesn't matter to me because I am really happy with what I am doing. I have no regret.

workingNOMAD

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 5:03 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

"2 quick cents. I believe going into ADSENSE full time is exceedingly foolish, but I believe that going into WEB DEVELOPMENT full time is the way to go if you want to jump in."

I belive not taking any risks in this life to be exceeding foolish!

Web development is all very well and good but you are only getting paid for time.

For instance I created a website on one day and have probably spent another day (if that) maintaining and updating it.

That site, through Adsense, has generated $500 thus far and continues to give me a small income and more importantly, an asset with a certain resale value.

Now lets go back 2 years when I was in the rat race. Working as a web developer in London I would earn around 130 per day ($250). Basically the time invested in that day at work is finished and I have just $250 to show for it (minus transportation to work).

It has also helped that I place myself offshore now and having living expenses well below London.

Jane_Doe

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jane_doe us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 6:05 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

I felt so sad and discouraged, because I am running not ten web sites but more than a hundred and been working so hard sleeping late at night and sometimes sleepless and yet earning very little.

A hundred web sites is a lot to manage and keep updated. If that methodology isn't working for you, consider just working on a site or two on subjects you really enjoy as a hobby and keep a day job until you get your sites up to a liveable income, plus some savings. (I think the buzzword of the day for working that way is called being a "chicken entrepreneur".)

jomaxx

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jomaxx us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 6:36 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

How much income is enough? My thinking is that twice what you need to live on is a good goal.

Goals are a dime a dozen. You don't quit your job based on goals. I wouldn't quit until I was making enough to live on AND it was clear that the venture would be a greater success if I spent more time on it.

In fact that's exactly what I did. Although I confess I dipped into my retirement savings a few times during the first 6 months of self employment. But I did have solid and steadily increasing earnings, and had a very realistic view of my site's probable growth arc.

Diversify.

Meh. Sounds great in theory, but if you have one real success I suggest you ride it as hard and as far as you can. As for adSense, I do agree that you should keep experimenting with revenue sources, but it's because of this: If you make good money with AdSense but next to nothing with other sponsors, maybe your site isn't based on a business premise at all? Maybe it's merely exploiting a loophole which may close at any time?

norton j radstock

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 7:32 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

This thread reminds me of one I started a year and a half ago:
[webmasterworld.com...]

Thought it might be worth updating what has happened to me since that post. Firstly, Google has applied 30 place penalties to two of my key sites. As a result my Adsense income has dropped to a fifth what it was mid 2005. However direct advertising has risen by an equivalent amount as advertisers look to diversify.

For anyone planning to move fulltime, I suggest you think through your plan and ask how you would deal with changes to this extent.

Pengi

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 11:01 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

I would love to reach the point where I could rely on my site(s) as my main income.

My earnings have yet again nosedived - actually made a loss yesterday due to all my pages suddenly showing ads for the same topic!

Before I can consider relying on my site for income, I'd bee looking for the following:
1. Substantial income being obtained from several distinct sites.
2. Substantial income being obtained from sources other than Adsense.
3. Substantial traffic being obtained from sources other than Adwords.
4. Sufficient earnings in the bank to last for several months.

My problem is that to achieve 4. Google Adsense and Google Adwords still offer by far the best return on my investment in time. I can diversify but it seem that this will earn less. Do I build up my income, then diversify, or do I diversify then grow?

vordmeister

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 11:53 am on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

I'm also planning to reduce other streams of work to spend more time with my websites. It's all about understanding the risks, deciding whether they outweigh the benefits for you. Level of risk adversity is a personal thing. Also makes sense to think about the recovery plan for when things go wrong.

Lifestyle is something to think about. It's a pain having to go into work every day, but on the other hand you can go mad sitting at home with nobody to talk to. You need to plan ways of having social contact much more when you are working by yourself.

FourDegreez

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 4:29 pm on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

Thanks for all the great advice, everybody! workingNOMAD, I agree completely. When you're working at your day job, you make a consistent income, but you're making someone else rich. Case in point: I was still in college (six years ago) when I created a certain page on my hobby site that has since earned me a few hundred dollars a month. Every month, for six years, I've profited off that page (and will continue to do so into the future). Had I done that work for an employer, I would've been paid once for my time, and he (or she) would've earned the recurring revenue instead. I learned a powerful lesson from that!

Of course for the greater rewards there are risks. Your work may not be fruitful. I've had that happen more than once, too.

you can go mad sitting at home with nobody to talk to.

This is a concern of mine. I'd love for my commute to be going from my kitchen to my home office, but I worry how I'll handle the social change. Having a fair amount of social anxiety, I wonder how I'll do without the forced social interaction of the workplace.

Another topic is what to tell friends and family. So far I've done pretty well deflecting occassional questions, but I'll be flooded with them if I go full-time. I wonder also what I'll tell my future neighbors, who will no doubt want to know why I live in a nice neighborhood but never seem to leave for work! Obviously I want to avoid the classic problem of people "helping" me by clicking the ads.

Dzordz

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 5:16 pm on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

I would think it makes much more sense to lower the cost of living by moving to another (read cheaper) country!

This is not something I am saying just like that. I live in Serbia (am a native) and here with a $1000 a month life is cool and if you have a place to live and hardship comes you could scrape by on as little as $300 per month. Plus real estate is much cheaper. And we have all the commodities of the modern world. Plus a lot of people here know english and german is also spread but not as much. Offcourse there are nicer countries too but I leave it up to you :)

ronburk

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 5:22 pm on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

Health insurance for the self-employed is probably a topic in itself. How to get a good rate?

It's a killer. Just how much it kills depends on where you live (enough so that if you're young and single, consider relocating based on the insurance situation).

If you're young, you can get better rates. The reason is, insurance companies "compete" to insure only the people least likely to need insurance soon.

Alternatives: marry someone with good insurance, part time job for gov-related inst., such as college, etc.

Chef_Brian

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 5:37 pm on Dec 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

Great topic and lots of good ideas, about two years ago I made a conscious decision to focus on content type sites based on topics I enjoy. I also planned on adding adsense or other "contextual" advertising programs to the sites once the traffic was consistent as a means of income.

Since that time I have launched probably a dozen or so sites, some have been winners while others seam to struggle to make it past the $100 a month mark.

I think it is important to define "success" when you venture into self employment. For me the money has always been great but it has been the life style that I really enjoy.

Over the last year and a half I have had months where I come close to breaking 10k and other months where I can barely break 5k ...However I am very happy and thankful each and every month.

I have also found that some topics just don't lend them self to decent adsense earnings. As mentioned I now create sites based on topics I really enjoy, skiing, Halloween, cooking, and online marketing. However the online marketing site does poorly , all my readers can spot adsense a mile away and are on my site for "my information" and have not interest in leaving.

Other topics can be effected by demographics, one sporting site I run brings in lots of great traffic from outside the us. However adsense earnings are probably "hampered" by this fact.

One thing I have learned is that it is much easier to focus on a handful of sites and continue to build on them over time. The google game is about working and waiting. It is also much easier to drive traffic (no traffic no income) in true niche subjects.

About all just enjoy website creation and don't give up ;-)

Brian

StuntasticAudi

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 3:28 am on Dec 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

I quit my job back in April. I was making about $30,000 a year working for a computer company. I had my own websites on the side and i met my salary with adsense within couple of months doing the sites. I had a choice to make. Take a change and quit my job and continue developing more sites or stay at my job and do both.

Usually most Americans work 8hr a day. So by quiting my day job that gave me extra 8 hours durning the day to work on my sites. Before i would come home from work and try to work on my sites. With 8 hours extra each day i had time to develop more sites. Now i own over 30 different websites and trippled my salary.

If i was you i would go for it. Working for someone sucks! Be your own boss. Take the risk..if you fail you can always go back to 9-5 job. There are plenty of jobs out there. Make sure you make atleast $10,000 more a year with adsense right now then you do at your job. You have to remember that at the end of the year you get hit with taxes.

[edited by: StuntasticAudi at 3:30 am (utc) on Dec. 4, 2006]

humblebeginnings

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 7:23 am on Dec 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

Hi Stunt, it appears you are either very lucky or very talented or both. I remember your first posts at WebmasterWorld when you were talking about quiting your job. So you have actually done it and you succeeded. Congrats! But not all of us are lucky and/or talented. I was on top of the hill a while ago but then my online earnings went down the drain. Now I am lucky I still have the (lousy) job. But I do agree that working for someone else s*cks major league. So I will persist in my effort to develop my own online business and ditch my boss.

workingNOMAD

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 10:06 am on Dec 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

COngrats Stunt, sounds like the way to go; that is try and match your salary and then concentrate full time on the website thing.

frox

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 10:32 am on Dec 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

The niche you are in matter a lot too...

If - to do a silly example - your main site is about the Wii, then that revenue is at a greater risk.

If on the contrary your contents is more "evergreen", you can be a little bit safer.

---

With Adsense currently contributing for far less than half to my life, this option is still quite far away for me.

On the other hand, as a freelance programmer, I am in the position to slowly move in that direction, developing solid, contents-based sites and lettign them emerge naturally in the SERPS.

I am currently in the 500.000 pageviews/mo, I want to add sites and get to at least twice as much within june 2007, and hopefully a big project will allow me to explode in the following 12 months...

So, the decision is deferred!

onlineleben

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3176124 posted 3:09 pm on Dec 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

This thread reminded me of an other member that went fulltime sometime last year. Actually just today I found a new posting of him, where he details how things worked out for him.
Maybe a good read ...
[webmasterworld.com...]

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