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Google's Panda - The Main Factors
brinked




msg:4399270
 6:24 am on Dec 19, 2011 (gmt 0)

Ok, so like always, every time google comes out with a new algo update, I become obsessed with it in trying to understand it as much as possible. I have taken on clients for free in an effort to learn about panda and recover them, usually on a paid by performance basis.

We know that panda mainly targets sites with a lot of pages and I am seeing that as well. Some of my theories may have been mentioned elsewhere but some of them have not. This is what I have seen from my own experiences. Of 9 clients I have worked with, 4 of them have made some sort of recovery. There were 11 test subjects but it turns out that 2 I did not feel were effected by panda, but a regular google penalty.

Rewritten Content - When you mention the term "unique content" most webmasters generally think of content that is not plagiarized from another source. Technically, paraphrasing an existing article usually passed for unique content. Not since google panda came along. Years ago one of my sites was mentioned on a very popular blog. After that story was published many other small blogs started writing about my site. It was essentially the same article just reworded. That is no longer considered unique content. Writing about a story thats already all over the web no longer does you any good. If your entire site or the bulk of your site deals with writing about popular stories that you did not start, you could be a target for panda.


all pages look visually similar - Look at any content farm and you will see page after page of just text. It is just paragraphs and essays of boring text that is all unique, usually written by a freelance writer at very low cost per word. You know how google says "do you have any graphs to support your argument?". Well in one case, I added dynamic feature rich graphs to a portion of the pages of a panda hit site as needed. This added life to every page and made every page visually better. On other sections I advised the client to add videos, images and anything else that would improve the usefulness of each page and that client has recovered over 60% of their lost google traffic within 2 months. She is still applying these rich media snippets so I think her recovery will continue to improve. Not only that, her bounce rate has improved from an average of 46% over the last 3 years to 35% over the last month. Videos and images are starting to prove very useful especially in my early tests. I have not did too much testing in this regard but this just makes sense so thats why I am listing it here.

Too many auto generated pages vs high quality content pages - If your site automatically generates content or you have a ton of user generated content, you may be in trouble. User generated content left un-moderated can cause big quality concerns for your site. If your site is a UGC type of site that is fine, just make sure you have some useful articles as well. This is also a big cause of empty/shallow content pages.


poorly placed content, ads given prime real estate over actual content - Where your content is located is a big deal right now. What is your intention for your visitors? Do you want them to browse your site and read your articles, or do you want them to click your ads? If you're giving priority placement to your ads over your content, you deserve to be pushed back. If your only intention is to get your visitor to another site then your site is just essentially a doorway page that users can do without.


Content Intention -What purpose does your content serve? Google has made it well known they don't want anyone to try to manipulate their SERP's. Over optimization is a real issue and it plays a role in panda. Do you have to scroll all the way down on your homepage to view a welcome paragraph? That's not very welcoming is it? Is your welcome message really a welcome message or is it a place just to stuff your money keywords?


A lot of time went into this and I usually hate sharing information with strangers that I put a lot of time into but I am just paying it forward. Thanks to tedster sharing his experiences, helped me become very successful so I feel I owe it to him and this community.

It is very possible to recover from panda. Its hard to get a 100% recovery but the more you improve your site the better your chances are at recovering traffic. Not only will you recover traffic by improving your site but your site will be of better quality, users will be more likely to link back to it, conversions will improve, bounce rates will go down etc.

I have one client who I was unfortunatley not able to recover at all in fact he took an even bigger hit since working with me. However, we improved his site and he recovered his sales so that he is almost making as much money as before panda hit. If he ever recovered from panda he will be earning much more than pre panda. There is more than one way to recover. Alternative traffic sources is also a great place to start. Get up a facebook page a twitter page a free iphone app etc. Be creative and beat google.

 

johnhh




msg:4400335
 12:30 am on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

Now I'm angry
Most 'genuine' webmasters have little to fear from Google, because they don't used machine-generated crud,
really - we, and others, have had to lay off people, many personal friends.
In business since 1995, all unique content years in the making, smashed by Panda. Quite a few of our respected competitors were hit as well.

You don't know what you are talking about .. Wall Street .. New York.. Haven't you heard of Berlin, Madrid, Paris, Amsterdam, London, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Rio, Mumbai.

Or you are American , 90% of which don't have passports and don't even know where Australia is.

We had our website up and running before others even had heard of WWW, yes thats right a WORLD wide web, when local papers in the US reported local pig prices...

this is going off-topic the OP was happy to share his/her info - now it's a rant that's annoying people.
edit spelling but I'm angry so mis-typed

brinked




msg:4400380
 4:19 am on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

johnhh,

I understand your frustration. I am american but a lot of people who come to me are from the UK asking for advice.

Sometimes I look at their site and see total crap and I pretty much tell them why their site was probably effected.

There are others who are deeply depressed and have a genuinely quality site. They may have some questionable seo tactics but they are not supposed to be SEO masters. They are supposed to be webmasters producing content for their visitors. I see great content that must have taken a lot of time to put together. It saddens me that some sites were effected when they clearly present great, valuable content to their consumers.

Google is a bot, there is no way it can definitely say a site is quality or not. They can look for common factors and build an algorithm that can try to identify a useless website but it can never be 100% accurate.

A webmaster just recently contacted me about his site that was effected. It was a high quality unique content site. It would be a very valuable resource to people who were searching for this topic. However, every article on his site had the same 2 word phrase because that is exactly what his site was about. Google saw this as redundant, but his site just had many different articles associated with that one topic because that is all his site is about. Lets say his site is about free widgets. His articles were along the lines of how to obtain free widgets, what to do with free widgets, why you should have free widgets, why your moms free widgets are better than your free widgets, why you should ask your father about his free widgets. This is repetitive but useful. He has a specialty site that deals only with free widgets, I guess it is harder these days to have a specialty site.

gregw2




msg:4400392
 6:21 am on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

@johnhh,
I agree with you. I know webmasters in both the UK and the US that were hit by the Panda, and virtually wiped out by it.

The sites in question were older, well maintained, and unique.

They also contained valuable information. They were not automated sites with PLR content or scraped content.
One of the sites was about printing presses and the history of printing around the world. It also had or has photos, and descriptions, already on site and within the articles.

For anyone to claim that they know what determined some sites to get the Google Panda Axe while others that appear to be no more than AdSense content farms is really pushing the reality button of anyone who has seen the results of Panda firsthand.

It was all a guess and still is. Granted rewriting some of your content or getting rid of some of your pages that are similar to what you already have published may help to get some ranking back but it does not guarantee it.

I have one site that is nothing more than an Amazon outlet and it did not get a blink from the Panda Axe.

I have an authority site which is much older dating from 2001 but updated and changed in 2008 and it was hit5 hard. It has no duplicate content and all of the content is written by 5 authors. Two of which are very active.

It was dropped from Google rank of 4 to 2, and lost over 2 thousands backlinks. I am guessing the backlinks were lost due to other sites trying to fix their own Panda Axe problems.

I took down some of the advertising for about 6 weeks and it had no affect. I have added the advertising back and it has made no difference. The traffic is gaining again but probably due to Bing and other search engines.

My site (the one I am referring to) was not hit as some other sites that I know that I consider as good or better than mine.

For certain topics I can get in a #4 placement on the first page of Google still but for other topics I am lucky to get to page 3 now. It is nothing like before.

It has been mentioned on another forum that Google Chrome is one element of the Panda Axe that is not exposed for what it has contributed.

Chrome may only have 300,000 users but these users are adding to the Google database by blocking sites that they find in their resultant searches and Google is taking note.

I have no idea if this, or what this, user effect would have on Google's site rankings and ratings, but it has been brought up. I am sure that there were many elements of data that were used by Google to determine which sites were Axed, but there are many good sites that fell and have not recovered, and many nondescript sites that are still plodding along as if nothing took place.

The only thing that a webmaster can do is to try and go over each site carefully and improve it. If that does not work then I have no clue.

I am taking a page a day and changing the content, that is already unique, to target new keyword phrases and see if that helps. As I mentioned, I already removed ads for almost 7 weeks and that made no difference. I how have different ads. I tried adding more AdSense and that has not had any effect either.

One other interesting event is that I had 180 pages linked to in Bing and in the last two weeks that dropped to 61 and today it has gone back to 118. I don't know what that is from. There are about 250 unique articles on the site.

gregw2




msg:4400404
 8:13 am on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

I want to add that in every forum that I have read and contributed to, it is always the people who did not have their sites crushed by Panda or hurt by Panda, that are the loudest and the ones that pretend that they know why other sites were affected.

These self-proclaimed intelligentsia can be found in every forum and they may have some valid points, but not one of them knows or understands anymore than the rest of us. Because it is all speculation. Google is not going to tell anyone what determines how they drop a site over another one.

I often hear these same forum experts talking about collateral damage, and they wouldn't know it from a grenade.

There is no collateral damage, it is all performed by bots.

Google's bots do not watch videos and they do not pay much attention to graphics either, only the code that is behind them. Google does not have thousands of personnel clicking from one site to another in each niche category and looking at each page. They do not have the manpower, and the costs involved would be astronomical even for Google. Get a grip.

It has more to do with the bounce rates of the visitors and the longevity of their stay on the site.

The entire Panda process was supposed to enrich the user experience and keep users from going to other search engines for finding relevant content to their searches. It has little to do with imaginary video feeds, pictures that are unique or anything to do with the prettiness of a website. Those elements can be user friendly and can help to keep a user on a site or may send them elsewhere.

It is all about whether the search terms that you are basing your content on is relevant to the searches or not, and whether the content is quality and what the searcher was looking for. Your content may all be brilliant and unique and possess real gems of wisdom, but if the searchers are landing on your web-pages for specific content and not finding it then there is a problem, and AdSense, or other ads are not an issue, or the problem. It is that the content is not what the keyword phrases produced in the resultant search and the users are not happy with the content that they were led to by Google when they typed the search term into the browser.

I mentioned one site that was all about the history of printing and printing presses. This site had an incredible amount of traffic for years and it all but vanished overnight. My guess is (and this is only a guess, I am in no way an expert) is that the site was getting a lot of traffic mistakenly, for printers in general. In other words, for new business computer and home computer printers.

This is my only reasonable conclusion, and until Google can straighten out the differences on its end of what each searcher is really looking for then many sites will suffer and many others will go on being in the search results that really have no better reason for being there.

All I have to say to all of the self-proclaimed experts that did not get hit or affected by Google Panda is good for you but I tire of hearing your expert knowledge and opinions that only reveal your egos and your lack of charm. You know who you are. Your site or sites skated by this time but maybe next time they won't.

I sincerely hope that no one is hurt again and that every site that is good and informative to the public remains in the searches where they belong, but we all know that is not possible.

As for the competitiveness of sites and their longevity and overall authority status. There will always be room for competition on small scales and this is because there will always be bigger sites and commerce sites looking for affiliates to help sell their products and reach more consumers. The tools will change and inventiveness will come into play, but there will be room.

Sure, there will be major affiliates that have deep pockets that will see your success and use it to their advantage, but do not let it get you down. There are other keyword phrases that can be optimized and put to use. You may have to settle for less monetary rewards but hey, it is called free market. Change your content to target the low hanging fruit and the lesser searched keyword phrases and I can guarantee you will see results. Don't let the bullies take away all of your efforts and have all of the fun and rewards.

We also know that Google is gradually losing some of the users that it is so addicted to. So no one is immune from Panda and its results, not even Google.

Quadrille




msg:4400423
 9:28 am on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

oops double posting, apols.

[edited by: Quadrille at 9:30 am (utc) on Dec 22, 2011]

Quadrille




msg:4400425
 9:29 am on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

You don't know what you are talking about .. Wall Street .. New York.. Haven't you heard of Berlin, Madrid, Paris, Amsterdam, London, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Rio, Mumbai."


Gimme a break. I siad wall street versus the wild west - ie it's not an unregulated free for all, it's big business. Geography didn't come into it.

And I'm from the UK, so there :)

And the discussion is very much on-topic. Loss of Adsense income is at the heart of people's compaints about Panda - it's hard to separate the two issues.

Quadrille




msg:4400431
 9:34 am on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

I agree with you. I know webmasters in both the UK and the US that were hit by the Panda, and virtually wiped out by it.

The sites in question were older, well maintained, and unique.

They also contained valuable information. They were not automated sites with PLR content or scraped content.
One of the sites was about printing presses and the history of printing around the world. It also had or has photos, and descriptions, already on site and within the articles.


So what on Earth makes you think this was Panda? The timing? Or do you have some evidence.

None of your description comes close to describing what Panda was about, or why such a site would have suffered collateral damage / whatever / please insert preferred term.

johnhh




msg:4400445
 10:08 am on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

So what on Earth makes you think this was Panda? The timing? Or do you have some evidence

Of course I know it was Panda , after these many years I know my traffic patterns, and a drop like that on a certain day in April is "created" not a natural traffic pattern.

Adsense on the site had nothing to do with it either, our Adsense revenues were very small in percentage of revenue terms,, we only had it on a few pages.

If you had a whole site with just a few words on a page and Adsense top, bottom, side panels which you knocked up in a few hours, well I guess if you got Panderized Google was probably right as it doesn't add value anywhere.

claaarky




msg:4400447
 10:13 am on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

Although my site has not yet recovered from Panda, a friend's site has and there may be something to be learned by comparing the two sites and our different approaches to Panda.

His site contained his own content except for one section using affiliate feeds, and he had a technical issue causing duplicate content (thousands of pages). In April he removed the affiliate content and fixed the technical issue, then left it (continued operating it like normal but didn't keep changing things). He recovered with the September Panda update.

My site is small by comparison but contained very little content of our own. I made major changes (added huge swathes of our own content, combined similar pages, restructured the site, dealt with technical issues) and continued to change things for months. Traffic got worse and worse until we stopped changing things at the beginning of October and left it to settle. Rankings and traffic began improving about 6 weeks later with a significant improvement from the November Panda update (although it basically brought us back up to where we were when Panda hit).

We are actually now ranking better for some terms than before Panda but overall traffic is still around the 50% mark.

The conclusion I've drawn from this is you have to leave changes to settle for months before you'll see any signs that you may be on the right track. If what we're seeing is the beginnings of a Panda recovery then you may see minor signs of encouragement after 6-8 weeks (some terms may rise a position or two). I'm not getting my hopes up but we are seeing more and more encouraging signs every week.

tangor




msg:4400448
 10:36 am on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

Google is not going to tell anyone what determines how they drop a site over another one.

Probably not... would give the inner workings of the black box away, but I have noted that in general the sites most affected are those which are REDUNDANT, ie. superfluous, repeat, more the same, nothing new, been there done that, etc.

The web is a big place. A Very Big Place. And even giant G is not up to the task. Of Indexing All. Bing makes no bones about what they include or why some internal site pages don't appear: redundancy, but Bing does attempt to list all home/index pages.

We had the Farmer change at G some time back which was cheered when it appeared which tackled the MFA, scraper, thin sites. That happiness lasted about 6 months before Panda 1x through 2x hit.

<smiling>I step away from this discussion for a few minutes and we're now talking about adding blinking lights ala 1990 (animations, images, video) to make our sites stand out? Images? Scratching head... the top SEs are pretty good these days, but even they can't do pics or vids worth a krap... only the text content has any assurance of site content/intent/value and that will be the significant part of how a site will rate/rank.</smiling>

There are no real answers for why one is hit by Panda unless one is honest in their appraisal of their own site. That's like asking parents to rank their kids as regards suitability in human social terms. However, we can always diversify and expand, just like we can educate our kids the best way we can. That's where the time, energy and funds should be expended, particularly if this is business site.

Quadrille




msg:4400451
 10:46 am on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

There are no real answers for why one is hit by Panda unless one is honest in their appraisal of their own site. That's like asking parents to rank their kids as regards suitability in human social terms. However, we can always diversify and expand, just like we can educate our kids the best way we can. That's where the time, energy and funds should be expended, particularly if this is business site.


Sums up the whole thread very neatly :)

netmeg




msg:4400538
 3:49 pm on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

From what I have seen of my own sites (and the sites I oversee for others) and various Pandalyzed sites I have been shown:

If your site is bad and your idea is bad, you're probably hit.

If your site is good and your idea is bad, you're still probably hit.

If your site is bad but your idea is good, you just might get a pass (which is probly the case with most of my own sites)

If your site is good and your idea is good, well then, Bob's your uncle.

MrSavage




msg:4400581
 5:42 pm on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

I haven't weighed in on Panda topics lately. I will say for anyone to take opinions as "gospel" should rethink. Greg summed it up best. I can't add to that.

It's a waste of my time reading this. The solution is to assume Google will cut your organic at some point. It called moving forward and assuming the worst regardless of whether you consider you site good or not. It's like the plague. Take a number and hopefully yours isn't pulled.

Pretending to come up with a Panda playbook or following someone elses playbook is a waste of your time. My opinion of course. Moving forward I'm assuming nothing. The only real credible solutions are with what Google releases about Panda. That's it. The biggest potential waste of time and money is hotly pursuing the Panda solution. Wait it out. Perhaps then Google will give up some of the search market and Bing and Yahoo will stabilize your organic. I realize a lot of people aren't able to launch something new and are stuck. Tweaking and tearing up based on a few people's opinion? Rethink that.

tedster




msg:4400602
 6:40 pm on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

I'd say Panda is one step in the great "sea change" that impacts all online navigation - and it's only going to get more intense. This sea change is fueled by the touch interface in all its forms (smartphones, tablets) as well as speech recognition.

All that spells the evolution and eventual death of "ten blue links". Touch and speech, not typing. And people using a touch or speech interface cannot afford to spend time investigating low quality websites.

Don't look to Bing/Yahoo for anything different. In recent interviews their spokesmen are putting forth a vision of the future that sounds more like Google than Google does! And a recent study reported here showed that on average, a search on Google results in an organic click 51% of the time, whereas a search on Bing only results in an organic click 27% of the time. I expect both numbers to go down.

And then there's Apple - have you checked out Siri? The whole online environment is changing. And Panda is one step toward learning how to meet the new online environment.

With recent Google changes, we did lose something from our lives that we really cared about - and this brings about something like grief response. It seems to me that many reactions to Panda are in the denial stage of "grief" and others are in the anger stage. But neither of those stages allow for effective adaptation. We saw a similar thing with the Florida update.

We're not going to reverse engineer all the Panda factors - and even if we did, new factors are always possible at any iteration. One thing I do like to watch closely is branded (even navigational) search traffic versus unbranded. And a second factor is direct traffic versus search traffic. When branded search traffic and direct traffic are healthy, then Panda usually seems to be appeased and generic, unbranded search traffic also cooks along.

Panda seems to take aim at sites whose business model was gaining generic search terms alone. That makes sense, given Google's stated motives. After all, this was the quintessential traffic profile for content farms.

Lenny2




msg:4400608
 6:46 pm on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

@Tedster [Panda seems to take aim at sites whose business model was gaining generic search terms alone]

That would be our site... for sure. However, I fail to see the correlation with a site that offers resources for unbranded searches and quality... in other words why do you have to advertise "brands" to be of quality material?

flatfile




msg:4400621
 7:29 pm on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

That would be our site... for sure. However, I fail to see the correlation with a site that offers resources for unbranded searches and quality... in other words why do you have to advertise "brands" to be of quality material?


I might be wrong, but I think it means typing your brand. e.g "tripadvisor tokyo hotels". Enough of those queries, might mean users trust tripadvisor. If users trust them, well Google better rank them high if they want happy users.

tedster




msg:4400632
 7:59 pm on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

Lenny2, understand that I'm not saying Google is right or wrong, I'm just reporting on what I've observed. Also appreciate that even though Eric Schmidt said "brands" are the way out of the internet cesspool, the algo team does not use the term "brand", according to a recent video from Matt Cutts.

Instead the algo team looks at things like trust and authority, and those are measured mostly via links. It's not the total volume of links but WHO does the linking. So even though you may not have a direct backlink from a high authority .gov website, you may well be just one hop away - or maybe two. All that helps build your trust and authority.

AlyssaS




msg:4400636
 8:12 pm on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

People need to keep in mind that Panda isn't the only thing going on. G has slipped through a lot of different updates often at the same time as Panda (or within a few days of the Pandas) and people have been mis-directed into looking into the wrong place.

For example, does anyone remember this thread from early Feb, when tristanperry picked up a G engineer saying that "Some really dramatic changes to how we use links are on the way"

[webmasterworld.com...]

We started to discuss it, but then Panda was unleashed and everyone forgot about it.

But I bet they implemented it, whatever it was. And I bet it had an effect that was then attributed to Panda, which means people have been trying out the wrong remedies thanks to being mid-directed!

tedster




msg:4400650
 9:10 pm on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

With regard to calculating link strength, I think one of the steps has been improved ability to do visual page segmentation - that is, "reasonable surfer" model rather than the "random surfer." The more a link is displayed in a way that a reasonable surfer might click on it, the higher the value transferred.

I also expect this area to be one of continued evolution for Google. For example, not just the greatest power for "in content" links, but "in content and above the fold."

Panda may not have been measuring "above the fold" directly (comments from Matt Cutts at PubCon seem to indicate that), but if they get the algo for it nailed down, I can imagine them being delighted to fold it in as a direct factor, rather than trying to measure its effects indirectly.

brinked




msg:4400671
 9:48 pm on Dec 22, 2011 (gmt 0)

By the way. A great way to get input from users on your site is to use a service that records your visitors on your site. There is a paid service that is very popular, I dont want to list their site but if you search you should see them easy enough.

This gives you a great idea of the usability of your site. You will be amazed how easy your average user gets lost even if you think your site is easy to navigate. I 150% recommend doing something like this as it gives you a window into how your users browse your site. I use it on every site I launch and it helps every time.

Sgt_Kickaxe




msg:4400867
 1:24 pm on Dec 23, 2011 (gmt 0)

Get up a facebook page a twitter page a free iphone app etc.


If you don't already have these don't start them now as an attempt to recover. New accounts with no history and no trust will not do you any good. If you have had these for some time in a semi-neglected state by all means begin promoting them more heavily, and using them regularly, or consider shutting them down.

Why? because your site does not need any additional negative signals besides the ones google keeps secret. In my opinion it's better to not have these at all if you don't intend to promote them to authoritative status, you can't be penalized for things that aren't there easily.

randle




msg:4400917
 4:10 pm on Dec 23, 2011 (gmt 0)

Also appreciate that even though Eric Schmidt said "brands" are the way out of the internet cesspool, the algo team does not use the term "brand", according to a recent video from Matt Cutts.

I'm sure quite a few folks at the plex wish Mr. Schmidt had chosen his words a bit more carefully and used better "Google Speak" when he blurted that out. Whatever the means, the result is the same, and very much intended: the web sites of large commercial brands rank better now than before Mr. Schmidt uttered those words.

Fundamentally this was a much bigger shift in what people experience searching Google than anything Panda has caused.

brinked




msg:4400976
 7:06 pm on Dec 23, 2011 (gmt 0)

Sgt_Kickaxe, I did not mean them as a way to recover. I mentioned them as an alternative method of traffic. If someone has a business they care about, why would they give up simply because google took away their traffic?

They still want people to come to their site, google is not working? try something else.

I just released my first iphone app 2 days ago and has over 1k installs. I did not realize it would get that many installs so quickly. I can funnel this traffic anywhere I want. It is making me work on a web version of it so I can drive them there and actually make money from it.

MikeNoLastName




msg:4401079
 1:45 am on Dec 24, 2011 (gmt 0)

Sorry been away from the conversation too long.

> The problem is with the sites that do not add any value to this information. Consumers want more than just the default information that can easily be scraped. If you have 10,000 products then you probably have 10,000 pages of non unique content. You are not offering anything different than the rest of the resellers selling the same stuff.<

Um, what about having the cheapest prices than any of your competitors because you didn't spend so much overhead creating a kicka$$ site. Even in brick and mortar you have the flashy expensive bakery and the cheap mom and pop bakery that the locals know about and buy from even though they are not flashy because they produce the same thing cheaper and with friendlier service.

I like Claaaaaaaarky's (a pun on gooooooooogle :)
attitude and arguments.

>Panda may not have been measuring "above the fold" directly (comments from Matt Cutts at PubCon seem to indicate that), but if they get the algo for it nailed down, I can imagine them being delighted to fold it in as a direct factor, rather than trying to measure its effects indirectly.<

Interestingly, I was invited to and attended the "Adsense in your City" session in LV right after Pubcon, and one of the G presenters brought the subject up with the comment that "your fold may not be the same as mine" due to screen size variances nowadays. Looked at the myriad of screen sizes accessing your site these days through Analytics? _I_ was amazed.

...and yes, I am an American, with a current passport (for the last 20+ years) who uses it a lot.

Take care all and Happy Holidays!

netmeg




msg:4401355
 4:51 pm on Dec 25, 2011 (gmt 0)

Um, what about having the cheapest prices than any of your competitors because you didn't spend so much overhead creating a kicka$$ site.


That concept is difficult enough to adequately convey to a user in the split second he arrives on a site; even moreso for an algorithm. The problem with banking on price as a unique value point is that 95% of the time, if you wait long enough, eventually *someone* will come along and equal or beat it. And maybe Google knows that.

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