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A more long-tail friendly site?
Tonearm




msg:3977147
 8:02 am on Aug 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

I recently read a comment wheel made about how his sites rank well, not only for the targetted short tail keywords, but the long tail as well. I'm ranking very well for my targetted keywords. How can I do well with long tail too?

 

signor_john




msg:3977240
 2:51 pm on Aug 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

Have lots and lots of useful, targeted pages on secondary topics.

wyweb




msg:3977242
 3:02 pm on Aug 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

text X 10

Tonearm




msg:3977382
 9:14 pm on Aug 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

Got it, thanks guys.

signor_john




msg:3977468
 12:44 am on Aug 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

To elaborate on what I said earlier, more breadth and depth = more targeted pages = more opportunities to be found in the search engines.

Let's say you've currently got a 500-word Wikipedia-style page about pickles. Expand that existing pickle coverage with a library of useful secondary pages about dill pickles, sweet pickles, kosher pickles, garlic pickles, watermelon pickles, pickled beets, etc., pickling techniques, how to can pickles, etc., and you'll have a much better chance of being found when someone is searching on "kosher pickles" or "pickle spices" or whatever.

If you can avoid the temptation to knock out a bunch of skimpy keyword-based pickle pages that have no intrinsic value for users (a sin committed by too many SEO-driven Web sites), you'll have a better chance of earning a reputation as a pickle expert, getting inbound links from reputable sites, and maintaining a long-term presence in Google's organic SERPs for searches on pickle-related phrases.

ianevans




msg:3979597
 5:16 pm on Aug 27, 2009 (gmt 0)

signor_john,

I smell a new business here:

Picklepedia ;-)

wyweb




msg:3979607
 5:29 pm on Aug 27, 2009 (gmt 0)

Well said signor_john.

fishfinger




msg:3979735
 10:50 pm on Aug 27, 2009 (gmt 0)

The man clearly loves his pickles :)

wyweb




msg:3979807
 2:39 am on Aug 28, 2009 (gmt 0)

The man clearly loves his pickles

Well it's a good analogy. As a novice SEO guy and confirmed pickle lover myself, I can see the parallels all too easily.

I particularly liked this part:
If you can avoid the temptation to knock out a bunch of skimpy keyword-based pickle pages that have no intrinsic value for users (a sin committed by too many SEO-driven Web sites), you'll have a better chance of earning a reputation as a pickle expert, getting inbound links from reputable sites, and maintaining a long-term presence in Google's organic SERPs for searches on pickle-related phrases.

This is SEO 101. It's a constant. Build an informative site. A site that visitors find useful and will not only come back to but tell their friends about as well. Your backlinks will come from that alone. You don't have to be the pickle guy. When I search I'm looking for contrast almost as much as I'm looking for definitive information. Maybe the information on your site runs counter to common convention. That's useful to me as well and I want to know that. It would be extremely difficult right now to become a leading web authority on the subject of pickles. Too many out there already. Add unique content though. Unique. Offer a different slant, a different take on what is already known.

I'm actually more of a tomato guy than a pickle guy. My gardens are legendary around here. I have a small site that concentrates extensively on alternative tomato gardening. It's seasonal of course, but every spring that site gets hammered by people wanting to try out different ideas with regard to tomatoes. I didn't write the book on tomatoes, nor am I even capable of doing it. What I can offer, in addition to mainstream thoughts on the subject, is my own slant, my own ideas on the concept of tomato gardening, of which I have many.

Anyone doing serious research on a subject will go deep in SERPS. My own logs confirm this. When I see keywords and keyword phrases ranking 100 - 150 in google results and STILL getting hit on then it's pretty obvious people are going deep. Long tail lets you take advantage of this, as well as much more. Maybe you might put together a keyword combination your competitors haven't.

But I like signor_john's post. I find myself agreeing with him more and more these days and that's slightly disturbing in itself but...

Oh well....

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