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How long would you give a new site to rank?
CWebguy




msg:3880419
 10:42 pm on Mar 27, 2009 (gmt 0)

What's a reasonable time limit for a new site to begin actually ranking in the SERPs? (not just getting indexed, but actually ranking). If Google is constantly updating backlinks and what not, is their still a period of waiting?

Cheers,

 

tedster




msg:3880697
 2:36 pm on Mar 28, 2009 (gmt 0)

There can be early good rankings, within a few weeks, and then they go away. Then they slowly reappear and grow into a more permanent situation.

The variables involved in seeing a new site rank are many - for instance, is it a blog, an ecommerce site, an information site, etc. How well does it do in attracting natural backlinks and building a buzz? What keywords you hope to rank for would be the big variable.

Yes, there certainly is a time-delay involved, in almost every case. But it's not nearly the 6 months to 1 year that we used to see.

CWebguy




msg:3881136
 2:17 pm on Mar 29, 2009 (gmt 0)

So, Ted, would this be the same thing as the "sandbox"?

Cheers,

jackyork




msg:3881298
 8:19 pm on Mar 29, 2009 (gmt 0)

I'm very interested in this issue too. One of my site, which is 5 months old now, ranked in the first page 2 months ago for about 1 month, then gone.
i really want to know Google's new site policy.

CWebguy




msg:3882656
 6:57 pm on Mar 31, 2009 (gmt 0)

well, if you actually got up there, I'm surprised then. That's odd, I have no idea either.

Cheers,

JohnRoy




msg:3882699
 8:23 pm on Mar 31, 2009 (gmt 0)

It has been 6 to 18 months on average.

tedster




msg:3882755
 10:15 pm on Mar 31, 2009 (gmt 0)

i really want to know Google's new site policy

There's no one policy - it's a site by site evaluation. Most new sites get a brief period of good rankings (although not for highly competitive keywords). This seems to be a testing period for Google, I've always thought they want to see if a new site really "takes off".

The most common experience is that a site does not really take off, and the good early rankings go away. Then it takes a few months (sometimes many months) to build all the quality signals that Google looks for so that more stable rankings are shown. But for a site that really takes off, those early rankings may never go away.

Things are definitely better than back in the old "sandbox" days.

[edited by: tedster at 3:51 pm (utc) on April 1, 2009]

CWebguy




msg:3882792
 11:15 pm on Mar 31, 2009 (gmt 0)

It has been 6 to 18 months on average.

Yikes! why even bother?

[edited by: CWebguy at 11:58 pm (utc) on Mar. 31, 2009]

workingNOMAD




msg:3883068
 1:16 pm on Apr 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

Because Rome wasn't built in a day.

travelin cat




msg:3883159
 3:39 pm on Apr 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

Yikes! why even bother?

The web is not a get rich quick place. There are of course exceptions to this, but anyone that thinks they are going to make a killing (or even a living) after only a few months with even a great concept is in for a shock.

Keep your day job until the site takes off. There is no way to know how long that will be.

dertyfern




msg:3883184
 4:10 pm on Apr 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

I've had a number of new sites go live in the past year and without fail, the sites with very high quality one-way inbound links seem to rank fairly well within days and not really lose ranking beside the normal fluctuations.

As mentioned above, in most instances, initial rankings do tend change for the worse, then creep back up over time.

Beachboy




msg:3883214
 4:34 pm on Apr 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

My experience has consistently been: Over a year.

CWebguy




msg:3883266
 5:26 pm on Apr 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

Keep your day job until the site takes off. There is no way to know how long that will be.

My job is web development ;)

The web is not a get rich quick place.

Haha, it's not about the money. But sometimes you want to start a blog or a site and actually get people reading. I can wait, just seems a little drastic. Oh well,

Take care.

[edited by: CWebguy at 5:34 pm (utc) on April 1, 2009]

HuskyPup




msg:3883299
 6:19 pm on Apr 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

It has been 6 to 18 months on average.

Yikes! why even bother?

I'll stretch it even further and say 2 to 24 months and even then it may not rank that well if Google does not like the tld extension regardless of the site authority and quality!

<slightly off-topic>

I spend a lot of time considering and creating my title bars and meta tags when constructing a site and ensuring they are reflected in the important on-page information.

They're not a last five minute job, they are the most important aspect for good rankings...that's always assuming the navigation, header etc is all done correctly.

</slightly off-topic>

CWebguy




msg:3883334
 7:10 pm on Apr 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

I spend a lot of time considering and creating my title bars and meta tags when constructing a site and ensuring they are reflected in the important on-page information.

Thanks for the tip Husky. Yes, the more and more I get into it, the more I have also looked at my title tags, etc. The meta tags not as much so, but they are still important (somewhat). Do you really think the TLD has an effect? I mean, I've seen .infos rank well, (of course they were also good sites). I couldn't see Google distinguishing between any of them except in country specific domains/TLDs. Interesting, thanks.

Although, I also know that competition seems to play a factor in time waiting (which makes sense).

Cheers,

[edited by: CWebguy at 7:13 pm (utc) on April 1, 2009]

acemi




msg:3883754
 8:29 am on Apr 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

I have noticed that domains which are registered and are given a page of content with one or two inbound links end up in the index on a back burner.

When the real site is launched months later the spidering is quick and ranking is markedly quicker too. Perhaps the months of existence without signals of mistrust (stuffed with ads, doorway fuctionality, ...) count in its favor.

CWebguy




msg:3883995
 2:27 pm on Apr 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

I have noticed that domains which are registered and are given a page of content with one or two inbound links end up in the index on a back burner.
When the real site is launched months later the spidering is quick and ranking is markedly quicker too. Perhaps the months of existence without signals of mistrust (stuffed with ads, doorway fuctionality, ...) count in its favor.

Haha, good tip. Thanks.

simonuk




msg:3884017
 2:49 pm on Apr 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

What most people fail to realise is they are trying to compete against websites that have been on the first page for years, have many quality back links and are so well established it requires pretty much the same amount of effort (and in some cases time) to get to where they are today.

I would be royally miffed if a 2 week old site jumped ahead of my 10 year old carefully crafted and loved websites :-)

It isn't impossible but a quick fix today could ruin your chances in the long term.

I noticed my main rival had revamped his site and he used a ton of underhand black hat tactics which did boost his site until Google found it. He's now nowhere to be seen and his 3 years of pretty high rankings for many search words have gone.

Motto is even long term sites can be hit if you cheat but if you really, really want page one position quickly buy one of the domains on page one ;-)

CWebguy




msg:3884031
 3:02 pm on Apr 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

So you could be developing a site for years, but until you release it, the search engines will consider it "new" and keep it in check.

I understand what you are saying simon, all about competition.

tedster




msg:3884102
 3:44 pm on Apr 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

sometimes you want to start a blog or a site and actually get people reading.

If it's a blog, you can reach out to the wider blogging community in your area in many ways. The simplest is just linking out (dofollow is nice) as you comment on what they offer. Even a basic blog for family and friends is lost if you don't let family and friends know that it's there.

Back in 2002 Brett wrote a solid post that can still get the promotional wheels turning: Mostly Viral Top Traffic Alternatives to Search Engines [webmasterworld.com]

You start with some basic awareness building, and the search engine attention follows.

CWebguy




msg:3884297
 7:41 pm on Apr 2, 2009 (gmt 0)

I see what you are saying Ted, I've never been big on the whole web 2.0 thing, but slowly (I said slowly) inching into it.

Cheers,

Whitey




msg:3884524
 3:36 am on Apr 3, 2009 (gmt 0)

My experience has been very mixed. I have seen new sites rank strongly within 7 days , yet others take from 6 to 24 months , irrespective of the .tld or uniqueness of the subject.

As others have said here, it seems to come back to the trust profile, but for my part it's sometimes too mysterious to fathom.

panther45




msg:3939155
 12:17 am on Jun 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

I have just starting to build a new web site. Twelve pages so far. I avoided building a new website for a long time. As it seems to me they are being discouraged. But that's just me.

panther45




msg:3939156
 12:19 am on Jun 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

A couple of the comments on here have been a little more encouraging than previous comments I have read.

arizonadude




msg:3939180
 1:12 am on Jun 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

I've gotten sites ranked in 24 hours that stayed ranked and others have taken quite a long time. Depends on the site.

Elsmarc




msg:3939860
 10:17 pm on Jun 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

"Haha, it's not about the money. But sometimes you want to start a blog or a site and actually get people reading. I can wait, just seems a little drastic. Oh well,"

It may have nothing to do with money to you, but if you think that will rocket you to the top of the serps, think some more. There are roughly 200 million web sites on the internet and more are going online every day. Just remember you do have competition no matter what your interest or subject matter. You may just want people to read what you write, but so do about 200 million other people and companies.

To make it worse, I often find sites ranking up there at the top of the first page which were abandoned (as far as updates go) several years ago (or more). Usually they have been online for years and somehow they keep a high ranking. Probably a lot of inbound links still exist (among other things).

If I was you I would start it now and figure it will be a couple years before you have a large number of visitors on a daily basis. It's not whether you want people to read what you write, it's whether people want to read what you want to write.

Good luck!

kinley




msg:3953527
 5:52 am on Jul 16, 2009 (gmt 0)

As mentioned in this thread: ranking for competitive keywords takes more than 24 months !

That is lot of time, money and effort on something of which you are not sure, what the outcome would be.

It could be that you have created a top quality site with the best content etc and kept it updated for years and THEN something new comes up on the internet and people move on !

MLHmptn




msg:3953538
 6:22 am on Jul 16, 2009 (gmt 0)


As mentioned in this thread: ranking for competitive keywords takes more than 24 months !

I'm sorry, but I completely disagree!

The "Sand Box" delay is nowhere near as bad as it was 2-3 years ago!


That is lot of time, money and effort on something of which you are not sure, what the outcome would be.

It could be that you have created a top quality site with the best content etc and kept it updated for years and THEN something new comes up on the internet and people move on !

No matter what you do your going to have to acquire quality "on-topic" links that may or may not cost you money and of course your going to have to put forth the effort and devout some time to anything that is a success! Building content for your site is what will truly set your site apart and drive traffic and of course you have to keep it updated, I mean after all, that is kinda my job with my sites, is it not yours? I wish I could just build a site and leave for Cabo Wabo! If this industry was really that easy to do everyone would be doing it! My best advice to you is to keep ahead of your competition, invest in your site, do whatever is needed to make it a success and ultimately reap the rewards for your dedication! There has always been that saying that you have to spend money to make money and I 100% agree with that. Whether that is directory links, hiring a PR firm or doing the dirty work yourself, your either going to have to invest your time or pay someone for their time. If you have that "stinking thinking" you might as well hang it up now and not waste a dime of your money because ultimately your vision will fail you.

kinley




msg:3953585
 8:19 am on Jul 16, 2009 (gmt 0)

Well said MLHmptn :)

MLHmptn




msg:3953718
 2:46 pm on Jul 16, 2009 (gmt 0)

Trust me, the sand box is nowhere near as bad as it used to be my friend. It is much easier and faster to rank sites now than it was just a year ago. Just keep at it, you will rank with the right links, content, and dedication to your project. I wasn't trying to burst your bubble, but realistically nothing in this life comes "easy".

Good luck to you.

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