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New Search Paradigm - Shifting from Text to Video
martinibuster




msg:3832623
 10:25 pm on Jan 22, 2009 (gmt 0)

YouTube is increasingly a starting point for search and research. It even surpassed Yahoo by becoming the second most popular destination for search.

There's so much variety and useful content that in many ways surpasses regular search results. For instance, I needed to see how to create a particular regional dish and there was a certain technique for dealing with the dough that I needed to understand. So I went to YouTube and queried it and there it was, a video of a woman at a street stall in another country making this dish.

The NY Times has a must-read report on how YouTube has become a reference tool [nytimes.com].

YouTube, conceived as a video hosting and sharing site, has become a bona fide search tool. Searches on it in the United States recently edged out those on Yahoo...

The article illustrated typical searches:

FACED with writing a school report on an Australian animal, Tyler Kennedy began where many students begin these days: by searching the Internet. But Tyler didn’t use Google or Yahoo. He searched for information about the platypus on YouTube.

"I found some videos that gave me pretty good information about how it mates, how it survives, what it eats," Tyler said.

The story relates how the child uses it to research everything from anime trading cards to finding solutions to his Wii games.

Apparently the traffic is there. The challenge is in producing video to tap into the additional stream of visitors. The barrier to entry is higher than twittering but maybe that's a good thing?

 

tedster




msg:3832630
 10:37 pm on Jan 22, 2009 (gmt 0)

One of the things I've wondered about in this area is that Google's home page puts their Video Search in the dropdown box, not in the immediately visible text links. The day that it moves to visible will be a sign that video search has really come of age.

callivert




msg:3832662
 11:26 pm on Jan 22, 2009 (gmt 0)

I'll ask the crass, but obvious and burning question.
How do you make money out of it?
Or is this a case of "do it for love" until a new system for monetising it arrives in the future.

Syzygy




msg:3832674
 11:59 pm on Jan 22, 2009 (gmt 0)

In November, Americans conducted nearly 2.8 billion searches on YouTube, about 200 million more than on Yahoo, according to comScore.

This startling statistic prompted Alex Iskold, the founder and chief executive of Adaptiveblue.com, a Web start-up, to ask in a blog post, “Is YouTube the next Google?” In other words, is YouTube effective as a mainstream search engine, and might it supplant or rival Google some day?

Lol! Bearing in mind the obvious fact that No1 owns No2, I wonder what prompted G to buy YouTube in the first place, or how it achieved such prominence in G's serps?

Remember that old chestnut: The best way to control the future is to invent it.

Syzygy

trinorthlighting




msg:3832703
 12:51 am on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

Our eccomerce sites have made a lot of how to do videos with links to products. We had more visitors make purchases last month coming from YouTube than we did Yahoo and MSN combined.

tedster




msg:3832752
 2:16 am on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

How do you make money out of it?

The best known example I can think of is George Wright of Blendtec, who was a keynote speaker at Pubcon last November. His "Will It Blend" video campaign is credited with boosting company revenues 700%. You can learn more here: [pubcon.com...]

phranque




msg:3832778
 3:30 am on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

i think there will be more use of and utility in vertically oriented search (if that's the correct term), such as linkedin for example.
the trick will be finding the optimal search engine for that type of content.
there is some interesting research recently published on this subject as reported in this current Webmaster General thread:
Search Engine Research [webmasterworld.com]

Robert Gentel




msg:3832921
 9:46 am on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

tedster, that's not an example of video search working, that's an example of social media marketing working while using video as the content medium. Those videos were not typically found through searches, but rather on social media sites and viral word of mouth.

2clean




msg:3833002
 11:48 am on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

PR masquerading as content...what's the news?

johnnie




msg:3833068
 1:46 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

I'll ask the crass, but obvious and burning question.
How do you make money out of it?
Or is this a case of "do it for love" until a new system for monetising it arrives in the future.

Perhaps good ole' commercials on a CPM basis?

2clean




msg:3833080
 1:53 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

Or the industries favourite....."Brand Reputation Protection" where you just charge a huge amount of money to register a company on YouTube under their operating name.

tedster




msg:3833152
 2:57 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

that's not an example of video search working, that's an example of social media marketing working

Sure, there is a social media component but it does not thrive on its own. After the viral buzz kicks in, then video search takes over and builds on the effect.

Today's online marketing often thrives on complex channels, even for text-only content. But it uses finability as well as social media. "Will It Blend" became a very common video search term, and George Wright met that demand with a full series of new video content.

Don_Hoagie




msg:3833163
 3:17 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

Makes perfect sense actually.

Researchers of education/learning have been in unison for years about the following:

1. The great majority of humans learn best by doing
2. If doing something isn't an option, they learn best when they can see it being done
3. Very few people are best-educated through reading or hearing about how something would be done

The web doesn't provide #1 (yet), so if one has a question about a complex task rather than a simple fact lookup, most of us would get our best results from video search, not traditional search.

mack




msg:3833164
 3:17 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

Searches being carried out on youtube, may not be typical searches. These may be users who have already found the destination they want to be at (youtube) and are ssearch for entertaining video clips. Not exactly the same type of user who would carry out an average search on G or y!. I imagine Youtube searches are made by people who already pretty much know what they are looking for.

Although my own personal search habbit has changed quite a bit. Tutorials for example. If I want to find out some tips or tricks for usign a piece of software I used to simply use Gooogle to find an article. Now I use Youtube to find a video about it.

Likewise if I was going to buy a new car I would be more likely to use Youtube as opposed to Google. I want to see it, not read about it. I imagine for certain searches video is a lot more useful than text.

Google know this. A lot of Google searches are now showign youtube thumbnails within serps.

Mack.

nealrodriguez




msg:3833215
 4:14 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

interesting, for i barely have used it as a reference tool, unless i want to learn the lines of a movie to make fun of it. come to think of it, i did learn how to film, save, and upload video on youtube. i also like trying to figure out what makes a video go viral by studying the hot channels like willitblend.

How do you make money out of it?

the new york times featured a youtube partner [nytimes.com] that was making a full-time living by uploading funny videos.
Mr. Buckley is one of the original members of YouTube’s partner program, which now includes thousands of participants, from basement video makers to big media companies. YouTube, a subsidiary of Google, places advertisements within and around the partner videos and splits the revenues with the creators. “We wanted to turn these hobbies into businesses,” said Hunter Walk, a director of product management for the site, who called popular users like Mr. Buckley “unintentional media companies.”

[edited by: tedster at 4:22 pm (utc) on Jan. 23, 2009]
[edit reason] fix formatting [/edit]

Kufu




msg:3833232
 4:52 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

One of the things I've wondered about in this area is that Google's home page puts their Video Search in the dropdown box, not in the immediately visible text links. The day that it moves to visible will be a sign that video search has really come of age.

Once Google figures out how to make YouTube as profitable as AdWords then it'll move the Video link to the visible menu. Why send traffic to a property that is not making as much money as your mainstay.

Perhaps that's what was between the lines of what you wrote.

Shaddows




msg:3833242
 5:02 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

Well, if we can monetise, and G can take a slice (or, more likely, if G can monetise and offer us a slice), everyone will be happy.

I might trademark VidSense and AdVid.

[edited by: Shaddows at 5:02 pm (utc) on Jan. 23, 2009]

nealrodriguez




msg:3833245
 5:10 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

VidSense and AdVid

line extensions; like the Mc40 ounce of st. ides McD's would let you buy with food stamps ;)

Once Google figures out how to make YouTube as profitable as AdWords

moment of inspiration: why doesn't youtube show sponsored relevant videos to the right of their organic results when one performs a query?

wheel




msg:3833316
 6:21 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

We need a video primer thread here. I can't do it, but I'd love to read one.

Our office sells product/services directly. Clients in this niche are always confused over the same two things (i.e. should i buy red or green widgets?). I have a unique approach I take to answer their questions. I'd consider making a video answering those questions (pretty sure there's nothing like this on youtube yet). But I've got the standard questions:
- host it myself? Or put it on youtube?
- how do I create the video?
- how do I get it into the search engines?
- how do I use it to drive traffic or business to my site?

XtendScott




msg:3833400
 7:51 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

Google needs to figure out to deal with the proliferation of copyrighted material. Warner Music Group, since discontinuing partnership with GoogleTube, is having YouTube "Disable" videos that have music in the video they represent. Videos are being removed that have background music or the users performing the songs themselves. Other companies may follow Warner Music Group leed.

This may result in either less traffic on YouTube, or their might be less "Junk" videos so that users get better information. Not sure how G will know what direction to go to make a profit till the copyright issues get resolved.

TrustNo1




msg:3833498
 10:31 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

"How do you make money out of it?"

Besides YouTube partners, ad revenue sharing etc. a lot of people use the videos to drive traffic to their sites where the money is made. Since people use YouTube to search as mentioned above and video also showing up in the SERPS, just another channel to drive traffic to your sites.

signor_john




msg:3833570
 11:57 pm on Jan 23, 2009 (gmt 0)

I think the title of this thread is wildly overstated.

Video search may be growing (and who knows, it may become extremely important) but "New search paradigm--shifting from text to video" is about as accurate as "New news paradigm--shifting from text to TV" would have been in the 1950s.

Video search is just a way to search videos, in the same way that Google Image Search is a way to search videos and Google News Search is a way to search news. Video won't supplant text in the foreseeable future, and neither will video search replace text search.

LostOne




msg:3833590
 12:33 am on Jan 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

I've been using YouTube quite a bit lately for tutorials on video editing. I often find myself thinking...now where's the best information on how to do this where I can actually see it and not get lost in text I can't understand.

It hasn't replaced regular search because of weeding through the junk videos(loud music, no narration, bad rendering) but it's becoming significant in my online life.

physics




msg:3833598
 12:52 am on Jan 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

Anyone have a link to the actual comscore report? Is this it? [comscore.com]
What I'd be interested in knowing is whether the number reported as youtube searches was the actual number of searches ON youtube.com or if it included searches on google.com that linked to Youtube videos?
From the press release I read there seems to be no distinction between searches ON youtube.com vs. searches on google.com

And/or what effect does the fact that Google jams those videos down everyone's throat by putting them in the top 5 of many SERPs [webmasterworld.com] have on Youtube traffic...

I'm not saying there isn't a trend towards people searching for videos more, but it seems like saying people are turning to youtube.com FIRST to look for videos might be inaccurate when I suspect many are going to google.com FIRST and then being led to videos through the SERPs.

Bentler




msg:3833613
 1:34 am on Jan 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

I'm sure Google picked up on the YouTube volume and duration trend long ago, from its toolbar data, and plotted out the performance projection from there... this would be why they bought it.

phranque




msg:3833771
 2:20 pm on Jan 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

wheel:
We need a video primer thread here. I can't do it, but I'd love to read one.

this might be a start, thanks to Samizdata:
Rough Guide to Web Video 2007 [webmasterworld.com]
Web Video Production Techniques [webmasterworld.com]

wheel




msg:3833780
 3:05 pm on Jan 24, 2009 (gmt 0)

Thanks Phranque!

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