homepage Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.196.206.80
register, free tools, login, search, subscribe, help, library, announcements, recent posts, open posts,
Subscribe to WebmasterWorld
Visit PubCon.com
Home / Forums Index / Google / Google SEO News and Discussion
Forum Library, Charter, Moderators: Robert Charlton & aakk9999 & brotherhood of lan & goodroi

Google SEO News and Discussion Forum

    
Getting Google to index more than 1 page
phred




msg:3697888
 11:28 am on Jul 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Built a site a few years ago with the main page, www.example.org, directly going to a full list of products. Have a few external links around to the page and ended up #1 in a number of key Google searches. So I go and “fix” it and break everything.

Wanted to have www.example.org drop visitors into a “Home/Welcome” page that in turn has internal links to sub- pages with the content.

So I go and build:

www.example.org – Home page – Greetings – Has internal links to the following
www.example.org/Products/ - The list of products
www.example.org/History/ - A history of the company page
www.example.org/Contacts/ - Contact page

Submitted a sitemap rating the relative importance of /Products/ at 0.9, the main page at 0.3, and 0.1 for /History/ and /Contacts/ pages. Also went around and got everyone to change their external links to my site to include both a link to /Products/ and the main home page.

Over six weeks now and Google doesn’t seem to want to index more than one page for my site and the page it picks is the home page. I’ve lost all my Google keyword search to all the products. Over the six weeks Google has hit all the pages in the sitemap several times and updated the date last indexed a couple of times – unfortunately always indexing the home page.

Any suggestions? I’m about to scrap it and go back to www.example.org being the products page.

Phred

[edited by: tedster at 12:28 pm (utc) on July 14, 2008]
[edit reason] switch to example.org - it cannot be owned [/edit]

 

Quadrille




msg:3698485
 2:24 am on Jul 15, 2008 (gmt 0)

Are not indexed at all? Or just not as well as you'd like?

Search for [a unique string of text] to check. And check on Google Webmaster tools.

Do they contain uniue, interesting information?

Do you have any thoughts at all on what *may* be happening?

phred




msg:3698535
 4:17 am on Jul 15, 2008 (gmt 0)

Are not indexed at all? Or just not as well as you'd like?

The root/home page is indexed. Yes it is as well indexed as I would like EXCEPT that’s not the really unique content that will bring new visitors to the site. It’s the content on the /Products/ page that will do that. The /Products/ page is not indexed and I don’t seem able to get Google to add it as an additional page for the site and to index it. Of course the root/home page contains internal links to the /Products/ page.

Search for [a unique string of text] to check. And check on Google Webmaster tools.

Done that and webmaster tools says the site was last indexed on July 7th and the page indexed was the root/home page. This is after the sitemap has been submitted, checked and says it contains 4 URLs for nearly two months. From my logs Google must have read the /Products/ and /History/ pages at least ten times over the two months. And the content has been updated over that period as well, so Google would be seeing additions to the content.

Do they contain uniue, interesting information?

The /Products/ page alone contains over 150 unique entries that do generate interest. In fact the 150 unique entries and the general category are what sends people to the site. The /History/ does have unique dates, names, places and contains stuff that people will search for.

Do you have any thoughts at all on what *may* be happening?

Beast me. When all the Products were on the root/home page it was indexed quite well and together with the unique general category the page was ranked #1. All the previous Google Product indexes are gone.

BTW, using a fake description makes all of this a bit obtuse, however, the site has nothing to do with any questionable content (religion, sex, drugs but maybe a little rock-and-roll..:-))

So my only solution seems to be reverting to the root/home page being the main products page and making the home page /Home/. Not what I wanted but without the products being indexed the site may as well not exist.

Phred

Quadrille




msg:3698634
 7:50 am on Jul 15, 2008 (gmt 0)

Does every page have unique title and meta description?

Do you have a 'code bloat' problem

Don't give up yet ... it still may be something easily fixable ....

phred




msg:3698733
 10:35 am on Jul 15, 2008 (gmt 0)

Does every page have unique title and meta description?

Different titles (eg "Samples Org - Products", or "Samples Org - History". All pages only have one meta tag, all the same and it is:

meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1"

Do you have a 'code bloat' problem

Do you mean is content duplicated - no. If not, not sure what you mean.

Phred

g1smd




msg:3699287
 10:16 pm on Jul 15, 2008 (gmt 0)

By "code bloat", the question was asking about the HTML that makes your pages.

Is there tons of HTML, or just a light sprinkling of heading, paragraph, and table, tags? Is there a bucketful of JavaScript at the top of every page? Is the code weighed down with huge chunks of inline CSS, or overloaded with a massive amount of "font" tags?

tedster




msg:3699459
 2:29 am on Jul 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

All pages only have one meta tag, all the same and it is:
meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1"

The meta description element has significant importance. Especially for a smaller website, it offers real help. See this current discussion [webmasterworld.com] for details.

phred




msg:3699466
 2:43 am on Jul 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

Hi g1smd,

Is there tons of HTML

Geeze I wouldn’t think so. Only one font family, with a few sizes. Half a dozen color styles and that includes link and visited colors. No Javascript. I do build all my pages pages in a table and add all content in rows. A fair bit of column spanning. A pretty typical “Menu” arrangement of small jpegs with maps over them linking to internal pages. Each Product entry is generated out of a database and looks like this repeated 150 times.

<tr><td colspan="4" width="280"><div align="center">
<span class="style2">
<p style="margin-bottom: 0;">
<a href="/ProductDetail/prod0001l/">Product #1</a>
</p>
</span>
<p style="margin-top: 0; margin-bottom: 0"><font size="2">Use category 1</font></p>
<p style="margin-top: 0; margin-bottom: 0"><font size="2">A wonderful thing!</font></p>
<p style="margin-top: 0"><font size="2"></font></p>
</div>
</td>
</tr>

I’ve always robots.txt blocked /ProductsDetail/, Google has never tried to go there and in my sitemaps I haven’t included that page/link

I guess one thing to consider is Google did index the /Products/ page before, and very well I might add, when it was the root/home page so Google didn’t have any problem understanding my tables/html.

By Friday if Google hasn’t indexed the /Products/ page I’m going drop back and make it the root/home page. Pity but ya gots to do what ya gots to do sometimes. Then eventually when they get around to re-indexing the only link they seem to want to see (the root/home page) they will go back to indexing the Products.

Phred

tedster




msg:3699469
 2:58 am on Jul 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

Even if they are blocked in robots.txt, do you have 150 "product detail" links on the same page? If so, that's something I'd suggest you break up into smaller pages.

Also, I'm not sure why you are blocking your Product Details pages - you may have a good reason. I almost always see better search performance with 154 unique urls indexed, rather than just 4.

g1smd




msg:3700166
 7:50 pm on Jul 16, 2008 (gmt 0)

Yes, you do have code bloat: 80% code, 20% content.

<tr>
<td colspan="4" width="280"><div align="center">
<span class="style2">
<p style="margin-bottom: 0;">
<a href="/ProductDetail/prod0001l/">Product #1</a>
</p>
</span>
<p style="margin-top: 0; margin-bottom: 0"><font size="2">Use category 1</font></p>
<p style="margin-top: 0; margin-bottom: 0"><font size="2">A wonderful thing!</font></p>
<p style="margin-top: 0"><font size="2"></font></p>
</div>
</td>
</tr>

There's ways to reduce that massively, even using tables:

<tr>
<td class="cent" colspan="4" width="280">
<p class="top style2><a href="/ProductDetail/prod0001l/">Product #1</a></p>
<p class="cen">Use category 1</p>
<p class="cen">A wonderful thing!</p>
<p class="bot">&nbsp;</p>
</td>
</tr>

In the CSS something like:

.cent {text-align (that's probably wrong): center; }
table tr td p.top {margin-bottom: 0; }
table tr td p.top a { -styling for the link- }
table tr td p.cen {margin-top: 0; margin-bottom: 0; }
table tr td p.bot {margin-top: 0; }

Note: style2 is not a very good name for a style. Name it as to what it *does*.

This is bare bones code. You *might* need the div to go back in.
It's untested, but hopefully shows you how much of it is redundant, or can be moved to the style block.

Repeated inline styles are much better replaced with a class name.
There is never a need to have "font" tags in these days of CSS.

Even with this implemented, the page still contains 50% code, 50% content.

There are even better ways to improve this.

phred




msg:3700538
 6:03 am on Jul 17, 2008 (gmt 0)

tedster

The meta description element has significant importance. Especially for a smaller website, it offers real help. See this current discussion for details.

Wow. Ok followed the link(s) and have updated all my meta tags trying to follow the balancing act.

do you have 150 "product detail" links on the same page? .. Also, I'm not sure why you are blocking your Product Details pages

No. Only 20 or so have "Descriptions" - that will grow but not over 50 I’d guess. "Products" and "Product Detail" is used in a generic way; the Product Detail contains information not relevant to people finding the site and is information I don't want indexed anyway. BTW, I have implemented several safeguards to thwart bots from getting to the Product Detail.

g1smd

Yes, you do have code bloat: 80% code, 20% content.
..
In the CSS something like:

.cent {text-align (that's probably wrong): center; }
table tr td p.top {margin-bottom: 0; }
table tr td p.top a { -styling for the link- }
table tr td p.cen {margin-top: 0; margin-bottom: 0; }
table tr td p.bot {margin-top: 0; }

Ok, didn't understand that the ratio of html to content was significant when getting Google to index a page. I've implemented your suggestions and with the real content, it looks like I may be getting upwards of 55% content, 45% code. Think I can get that a bit better maybe investigate an alternative to the current three-up list.

Thank you guys for all the help. tedster the meta tags take work/thought and I've probably spent more time "fixing" that than the code bloat. g1smd thanks for the examples.

Google is hitting the site with great regularity so maybe they will see the changes soon. Content has changed on several pages so maybe I'll delete the current sitemap and add a new one with last modified dates updated.

Phred

tedster




msg:3700551
 6:23 am on Jul 17, 2008 (gmt 0)

the meta tags take work/thought and I've probably spent more time "fixing" that than the code bloat

That sounds like the right priority. Code bloat does not create as big a barrier today as it once did. But it's still definitely worthwhile to fix it. Faster downloads, less bandwidth used by googlebot, all those good things are part of the result.

Many times when I work with clients, getting them to value the meta description is one of the early targets. Sometimes they need to modify or change the CMS just to make it possible. It ends up making a cultural change within their web team, among their content writers, their marketing department and so on. This little 165 character thing all of a sudden becomes an essential part of the work of generating a thriving website.

It's worth doing.

g1smd




msg:3701078
 7:02 pm on Jul 17, 2008 (gmt 0)

Yes, the meta description is more important than the code bloat, but reducing the amount of HTML makes for a faster page load and reduces the bandwidth used by your site. It's an easy win.

Yes, I am quite sure that you can improve on my quick example a little bit more. I wanted to get you started on that road, with a couple of "broad view" design hints.

Global Options:
 top home search open messages active posts  
 

Home / Forums Index / Google / Google SEO News and Discussion
rss feed

All trademarks and copyrights held by respective owners. Member comments are owned by the poster.
Terms of Service ¦ Privacy Policy ¦ Report Problem ¦ About
© Webmaster World 1996-2014 all rights reserved