homepage Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.242.140.11
register, free tools, login, search, pro membership, help, library, announcements, recent posts, open posts,
Become a Pro Member
Home / Forums Index / Google / Google SEO News and Discussion
Forum Library, Charter, Moderators: Robert Charlton & aakk9999 & brotherhood of lan & goodroi

Google SEO News and Discussion Forum

This 39 message thread spans 2 pages: 39 ( [1] 2 > >     
Internal Linking Strategy for Google
Gshaughn

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 1:22 pm on Aug 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

Hello, I have read several posts related to internal linking. I tried to reply to this one --> [webmasterworld.com...] but it was closed, so I started a new discussion.

A couple years ago I added 6 text links in the header across a 500 page site. It seemed to really help those pages rank well in Google for that anchor text. That appears to no longer be the case. I am looking for some feedback related to internal linking best practices as I assess and re-deploy a new internal linking strategy. Below are questions, rhetorical questions, and experiences related to the topic.

-What is the risk/benefit of using the same alt="keyword phrase" on the header image on every page in the site that links to the homepage? Is there a risk or advantage in varying the alt text for this image link across the 500 page site? We have inconsistencies in this area - I'd imagine that the same image should have the same alt text, and anything else could be construed as manipulation? Does Google think like that?

-I have several pages that all have the same internal link anchor text pointing to them. I am assuming this is not a good thing, and I should point all the links with 'keyword phrase' as the anchor text to the page with that is the first most relevant match for that 'keyword phrase', the keyword phrase page. What if the homepage is ranking the highest for this term? Should I point all 'keyword phrase' anchors to the 1st most relevant page, which itself linked to from the homepage? Would it be better to point all the links directly to the homepage because it is ranking the highest for the keyword phrase?

-Instead of 'run of site' text links I am placing links only on pages relevant to that keyword. This will dramatically cut down the total number of internal links to a particular page, but the referring pages will all be relevant. Quality vs Quantity?

-Text links in the footer across the 500 page site.... I did some searches for a couple long tail keyword phrases in anchor text in the footer across the site and noticed we ranked nowhere for those queries. If quantity of internal links with the keyword phrase were a huge factor you'd think sheer number of internal links alone would boost a long tail keyword phrase on a quality site to the top of the SERPs, right? Is this evidence that sitewide internal links could be hurting ranking? Could a sitewide footer link for 'keyword phrase' actually hurt our ranking for 'keyword phrase' because there are SO many links regardless of referring page relevancy?

-Is a preferred internal linking architecture Homepage with links for 'KW1', 'KW2', 'KW3' to the internal most relevant pages respectively, then internal links from relevant pages on the site pointing to the kw1, kw2, k3 page? Should the Kw1, kw2, kw3, point back to the homepage with the very same anchor text the homepage points to them with? That kinda doesn't make sense to link back to the homepage.

-What anchor text should be used when linking to the homepage internally? The top KW phrase? "Home"? What if there is a more specifc, relevant page than the homepage on the site, which is probably the case on most sites?

I'd really appreciate insight you'd be willing to share. I am trying to conceptualize and refine the strategy before starting to change links. Trying to create a blue print for a game plan.

Thanks!
Greg

 

tedster

WebmasterWorld Senior Member tedster us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 8:57 pm on Aug 26, 2007 (gmt 0)

That's a lot to talk about - so I'll just take up one issue for now.

HOME PAGE LINKS
Linking back to the Home Page with different anchor text from different parts of the site seemed to cause ranking problems last year for at least two sites I remember. For a while this kind of game seemed to be a secret key for ranking. Then maybe a year back, maybe a bit longer, it stopped working.

As a rule, I find that domains that use keyword text for the Home Page from the very beginninghave had no problems, but that's not always the case for sites that are already developed and then switch to keyword anchor text pointing to the home page.

This kind of strategy did well when back the algo was more of a pure character-string match. Then other factors - especially 1) semantic analysis of various types and 2) historical changes - started kicking in more and more.

Tonearm

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 4:15 pm on Aug 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

Is there also a potential problem with internally linking to other pages (not home page) with differing anchor text?

Also, you mention historical changes. Do you mean Google is now paying a lot more attention to how a site has changed, not just where it is now?

glengara

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 4:46 pm on Aug 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

I'd keep all navigation constant, and if linking to the same page with different anchor text would have it from within topical page content, but then I'm the nervous type.

"..trying to conceptualize and refine the strategy before starting to change links."

As Tedster suggests, changing established navigational anchor text can be risky, you might consider also changing the page text to "justify" it.....

CainIV

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 6:11 pm on Aug 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

I find now that more often than not changing the home link to a keyword phrase causes ranking issues more than helping.

Having it in place when the site is created can help.

I find what is more effective is to 'occasionally' link home with different closely related variations of keyword text from inside real content on your website, and sparingly.

blend27

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 7:33 pm on Aug 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

--- Linking back to the Home Page with different anchor text from different parts of the site seemed to cause ranking problems ---

Not in my neck of the woods, as long as homepage is relevant to the text/subject in the link and the text- linked page is relevant by content to the homepage and other pages linking to text- linking page with similar text, I don't think it is a problem at all. Weve looked in to that in that past couple of month and found that as long as the above is true - long tail-ROCKS!

Variations of keyword1+keyword2 and keyword2+keyword1 are usually returning diff. SERP, but if carefully planed, varying incoming text from within the site/pages related by content helps! a big chunk and if similar BLs are added externally there is no end to 'HOW DEEP THE RABIT HOLE GOES' from semantics approach.

glengara

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 7:45 pm on Aug 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

"I don't think it is a problem at all.."

And you won't until it suddenly is :-)

Problem with many webmasters is their propensity for pushing things over the edge....

blend27

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 8:47 pm on Aug 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

--Problem with many webmasters--

I know right..

the plan was carrefuly executed, no SPAM, just on topic links with in a site with content to back it up.

pageoneresults

WebmasterWorld Senior Member pageoneresults us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 9:07 pm on Aug 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

Is there also a potential problem with internally linking to other pages (not home page) with differing anchor text?

No, but I would think you would dilute the "overall meaning" of the targeted page if the anchor text associated with it changes within the site. For example, Purple Widgets. I'm not going to change that anchor text as it describes the destination in two short primary keywords.

6.1 Link text
[w3.org...]

Link text should indicate the nature of the link target.

In addition to clear link text, content developers may specify a value of the "title" attribute that clearly and accurately describes the target of the link.

Here's a neat little tidbit, try using the <link> element to group pages together and give them more "meaning". :)

Use <link>s in your document
[w3.org...]

blend27

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 11:03 pm on Aug 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

from 6.1 Link text -link text should indicate the nature of the link target

that is when we say BINGO on "overall meaning", but have not used "TITLE", Just Yet...

Marcia

WebmasterWorld Senior Member marcia us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 11:13 pm on Aug 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

Here's a related issue.

Someone posted in a thread not very long ago (saying they were positive) that if there are several links on a page leading to the same target page, Google only counts the one that occurs first in the code, and uses that as the linking anchor text, not the rest.

Any opinions on that?

Tastatura

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 11:30 pm on Aug 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

that if there are several links on a page leading to the same target page, Google only counts the one that occurs first in the code, and uses that as the linking anchor text, not the rest.

Any opinions on that?

Not sure, but I think I remember someone from Google (Matt or Adam?) 'suggesting' that on one page there shouldn't be more then one link pointing to another page...

blend27

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 11:50 pm on Aug 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

-- Google only counts the one that occurs first in the code --

Thus, providing appropriate naming convention gets you in image search (if Hn(mostly h2,h3) is relevant)

:)

OutdoorMan

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 11:57 pm on Aug 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

Here's a neat little tidbit, try using the <link> element to group pages together and give them more "meaning".

Use <link>s in your document
[w3.org...]

I have concidered this before, but I'm not quite sure of how I should understand these descriptions:

"Start
Refers to the first document in a collection of documents. This link type tells search engines which document is considered by the author to be the starting point of the collection."

"Index
Refers to a document providing an index for the current document."

What's the difference between Start and Index? Can anyone give me an example of how to use the above correctly?

Marcia

WebmasterWorld Senior Member marcia us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 12:03 am on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

-- Google only counts the one that occurs first in the code --
Thus, providing appropriate naming convention gets you in image search (if Hn(mostly h2,h3) is relevant)

That's only assuming it's only one and anchor text from the first one that counts. But do we know that for sure it's so, just because some person posted it on a message board?

What if the top logo links back to the homepage (usability studies show that it's expected by people), and there's also a link back in the top of the left navigation (where people also expect it to be), and then, if you scroll down to the bottom of the page there's another in the footer so users can get to the homepage easily?

Not sure, but I think I remember someone from Google (Matt or Adam?) 'suggesting' that on one page there shouldn't be more then one link pointing to another page...

Well, if in fact one of them did 'suggest' not to, would it have been suggested to make life easier on the spam team, or was the primary issue doing what's convenient and best keeping users in mind as first priority - and site stickiness and conversion to sales?

Tastatura

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 12:18 am on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

Not sure, but I think I remember someone from Google (Matt or Adam?) 'suggesting' that on one page there shouldn't be more then one link pointing to another page...

Well, if in fact one of them did 'suggest' not to, would it have been suggested to make life easier on the spam team, or was the primary issue doing what's convenient and best keeping users in mind as first priority - and site stickiness and conversion to sales?

:)) I don't know the answer to that, but (iirc) it was said that it was for benefit of user (and I would not doubt a company with 'do no evil' as a motto to have ulterior motives them never ;) ).
Ill see if I can find info I am referencing

P.S. - I can't find the reference. Audio interview with M.C., in which I think he states what i referenced earlier, is not available any more. It was done in Oct 2006 so info might be stale anyways...

[edited by: Tastatura at 12:58 am (utc) on Aug. 28, 2007]

leadegroot

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 12:39 am on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

OutdoorMan:
Think of a 'book' metaphor for use of LINKs -
You get a table of contents (the index), a first page (start) and you turn the pages in sequence (next and previous)

Parts of some websites work sequentially like this - think of 'page 2 of 7' type articles

OutdoorMan

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 1:04 am on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

leadegroot > Thanks.

But it's still not clear to me :)

Can you tell me: what is the difference of the link types Contents and Index then? Is there a difference at all?

And how should I use the link types Prev and Next -- Can I make the last pages loop like this:

Page1 > Page2 > Page3 > Page1 (the 1st page is the 'Next' value in Page3 and Page3 is the 'Prev' value in Page1)

or should I only do this: Page1 > Page 2 > Page3 (Page3 have no 'Next' value)?

Thanks.

Marcia

WebmasterWorld Senior Member marcia us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 1:44 am on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

I've never, ever heard one single word about those tags having anything to do with SEO.

leadegroot

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 1:53 am on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

Can you tell me: what is the difference of the link types Contents and Index then? Is there a difference at all?

Yeah, I've always thought they seemed a bit interchangeable too :)
Here we go:
[w3.org...]
(I assume I am allowed to link there! :))
Contents
Refers to a document serving as a table of contents. Some user agents also support the synonym ToC (from "Table of Contents").
Index
Refers to a document providing an index for the current document.
Obviously a huuuuge difference ;)

or should I only do this: Page1 > Page 2 > Page3 (Page3 have no 'Next' value)?

You can do whatever you like on your site, hon :)
I would say that if it makes sense to make it loop then do it, but I can't think of many places it would make sense (but I don't know your site) and generally go for 'page 3 has no next value'
The HTML purists would probably sob, but I would fall back on the contextual making sense thing - if it adds value to your site, do it.

Oh, in passing - I've never seen any indication that the bots follow link references :(

pageoneresults

WebmasterWorld Senior Member pageoneresults us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 2:06 am on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

I've never, ever heard one single word about those tags having anything to do with SEO.

We probably want to keep it that way too. ;)

There are all sorts of usability and accessibility elements and attributes available to Webmasters. Many of those elements pre-date Google, the <link> Element is definitely one of them.

I've been working with very long documents that need to be broken down into more palatable pages. Not only do I bring all of those pages into their respective sub-directories, I'm going to take a few extra steps to ensure that the pages are whole. I believe the <link> element helps to solidify theme(s) within a site.

These external resources can be styling information (CSS), help for navigation, information under another form (RSS), contact information, etc.

The LINK element (<link>) is used to add this information in the header of your document in the HEAD element.

12.3.3 Links and search engines
[w3.org...]

Authors may use the LINK element to provide a variety of information to search engines, including:

  • Links to alternate versions of a document, written in another human language.
  • Links to alternate versions of a document, designed for different media, for instance a version especially suited for printing.
  • Links to the starting page of a collection of documents.

B.4 Notes on helping search engines index your Web site
[w3.org...]

Indicate the beginning of a collection
Collections of word processing documents or presentations are frequently translated into collections of HTML documents. It is helpful for search results to reference the beginning of the collection in addition to the page hit by the search. You may help search engines by using the LINK element with rel="start" along with the title attribute, as in:

I cannot prove or disprove that the <link> Element is of any "major benefit" from an SEO standpoint. I can tell you that certain UA's utilize those <link> Elements to perform a variety of additional user functionality.

The W3 is the authority on HTML/XHTML/CSS. If the W3 says that I have the above elements available to me and that they will assist my users in a more "complete" browsing experience, then I'm going to implement them. Whether they are discussed or not. The <link> Element just happens to be one of those that few discuss around here. Oh, it gets its fair share of exposure when referencing external CSS, RSS, etc. But when it comes to these "advanced" elements, many are not aware of their existence or how they may help in the overall page quality equation.

The same minds that developed these elements and attributes are some of the same minds behind how the search engines work today. Remember, in the beginning it was all about organizing information. A lot of this stuff applies to the "Librarian" segment of the indices. And also the scientific communities. It really applies to any type of information architecture where pages need to be logically grouped, sectioned off, etc. If you've got a breadcrumb trail, you're a perfect candidate for utilizing the <link> Element.

Try it, you'll like it. :)

[edited by: pageoneresults at 2:28 am (utc) on Aug. 28, 2007]

pageoneresults

WebmasterWorld Senior Member pageoneresults us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 2:25 am on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

Let me throw a couple more into the mix...

12.3.1 Forward and reverse links
[w3.org...]

The rel and rev attributes play complementary roles -- the rel attribute specifies a forward link and the rev attribute specifies a reverse link.

Consider two documents A and B.

Document A: <LINK href="docB" rel="foo">

Has exactly the same meaning as:

Document B: <LINK href="docA" rev="foo">

Both attributes may be specified simultaneously.

Now, how would you interpret the above? Me? Hehehe, I would consider that a major accessibility feature. If I can specify both reverse and forward links, how could that come into the overall equation of page quality?

Remember, Google states they look at over 200 factors. It used to be 100. Even at 100, we may only "SEE" a small percentage of those. The rest are obscure little things that are mentioned in various patents, white papers, etc. In fact, all of it is at the W3, everything. You just have to find it. And it sure ain't easy! ;)

Oh, in passing - I've never seen any indication that the bots follow link references :(

CSS, RSS, RDF, all sorts of <link> references are followed by search engines.

Marcia

WebmasterWorld Senior Member marcia us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 4:39 am on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

I've been working with very long documents that need to be broken down into more palatable pages.

That's breaking down a document into separate pages that are meant to be sequential, so a linear approach is applicable, because once it's broken down, it does become PageA, PageB and PageC - in linear fashion.

But with the exception of those type of sequential documents, the web isn't a linear medium like a book, page1, page2, page3; it's a dynamic, interactive, hyperlink-based environment.

>>Links to alternate versions of a document, written in another human language.
>>Links to alternate versions of a document, designed for different media, for instance a version especially suited for printing.
>>Links to the starting page of a collection of documents.

How do you indicate the beginning, middle and end of this collection of documents? Where does it start and where does it end? What's the sequencing of pages?

[walmart.com...]

Indicate the beginning of a collection
Collections of word processing documents or presentations are frequently translated into collections of HTML documents. It is helpful for search results to reference the beginning of the collection in addition to the page hit by the search. You may help search engines by using the LINK element with rel="start" along with the title attribute...

If someone arrives at that site at an electronics page, where's his start? And what's next?

<HEAD>
<TITLE>Reference manual -- Page 5</TITLE>
<LINK rel="Start" title="The first page of the manual"
type="text/html"
href="http://someplace.com/manual/start.html">
</HEAD>

First page of the manual. Perfect example of a collection of linear pages: a manual.

[edited by: Marcia at 4:43 am (utc) on Aug. 28, 2007]

Marcia

WebmasterWorld Senior Member marcia us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 4:54 am on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

So getting back to the topic of internal linking strategy for Google, which we'd assume is related to anchor text and/or PR distribution on a site, if the first image alt= anchor text goes back to the homepage saying "Acme Associates" and a link on the bottom has anchor text to "Widgets Home" which anchor text is used? The first, the last or both?

Marcia

WebmasterWorld Senior Member marcia us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 7:02 am on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

This is still a super internal linking strategy:

Theme Pyramid [webmasterworld.com]

Miamacs

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 12:24 pm on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

Someone posted in a thread not very long ago (saying they were positive) that if there are several links on a page leading to the same target page, Google only counts the one that occurs first in the code, and uses that as the linking anchor text, not the rest.

... thanks, this reminded me to check on the tests I've been doing in this area, left untouched for like... half a year. This entire topic might not be news to others, but I've never used more than a single link from page to page, so I didn't know for sure.

...

And wow.
It really seems to be the case.

...

Marcia, I've checked some of the sites I did the experiment on and I think I can confirm that this remark was more or less on spot.

If you have more than a single anchor text link on the same page pointing to a resource, only the anchor text from the first one is recognized.

You know... all the sites I've been seeing trying to link back a hundred times to themselves... this is funny. Well, in conclusion I'll need to clean up the articles on the sites I did the tests on. ( *grin* )

...

And look through the internal links just in case.

Oh and in addition, this has nothing to do with img and other types links.

If a page has an img link first in the code, that doesn't negate the occurrance of an anchor text link later down the page, not even if ALT or TITLE is used on the picture. ( rest assured the ALT attribute really is nothing but text in Goole's eyes anyway ... )

...

Oh yeah, and theme pyramid. Definitely.

Phew, I kinda like it when all I need to do is dig up my own data to confirm things...

pageoneresults

WebmasterWorld Senior Member pageoneresults us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 3:22 pm on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

But with the exception of those type of sequential documents, the web isn't a linear medium like a book, page1, page2, page3; it's a dynamic, interactive, hyperlink-based environment.

No, it isn't linear, but...

There are "always" pages within a site that are linear and that is where these elements come into play.

If someone arrives at that site at an electronics page, where's his start? And what's next?

His start might be the primary index page for /electronics/. His next might be a review of the product he is looking at. It all revolves around the architecture of the site. If there is a breadcrumb trail, that's the focal point and what determines the sequencing.

So getting back to the topic of internal linking strategy for Google.

I'm curious, does everyone think I'm off topic with the <link> Element information being part of an internal linking strategy?

This is still a super internal linking strategy: Theme Pyramid

Ah, more power for the pyramid maybe? Another element to solidify the structure of the pyramid? And just because few discuss these elements, that doesn't mean that they have no value. I come across stuff at the W3 regularly that just amazes me. So much so, there is a brown tint on the ceiling above me due to the "light bulb" going on multiples times throughout the day. ;)

If you have more than a single anchor text link on the same page pointing to a resource, only the anchor text from the first one is recognized.

Interesting observation.

Clear and consistent navigation mechanisms are important to people with cognitive disabilities or blindness, and benefit all users.

The above describes Googlebot, Slurp, MSNBot, etc.

Guideline 13. Provide clear navigation mechanisms.
[w3.org...]

The above 10 Accessibility Checkpoints are a GOLDMINE of information, trust me. :)

"Front-Loading" - "Inverted Pyramid Writing" [webmasterworld.com]

OutdoorMan

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 9:20 pm on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

leadegroot > Thanks for your post! It was helpfull.

pageoneresults > Interesting reading.

I'm curious, does everyone think I'm off topic with the <link> Element information being part of an internal linking strategy?

I don't think it's off topic. Actually I can see how it as a supplement for linking pages together -- I just don't have enough knowledge of the subject to contribute with anything (yet).

Also I think that when the W3C mention <link>-elements in there articles, somehow it must be usefull elements.

And I do believe that W3C IS a goldmine ;)

tedster

WebmasterWorld Senior Member tedster us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 9:47 pm on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

Also I think that when the W3C mention <link>-elements in there articles, somehow it must be usefull elements.

One of my clients publishes an online magazine, with many multi-page articles. Several months back they began using next= attributes in a link element, and they noticed more people licking through to the last page. Then, this month, they published a new articel but forgot to include the next= attributes. They got several email complaints!

How useful it is to the search engines, I can't say - but clearly some users are using it. I know I do.

Marcia

WebmasterWorld Senior Member marcia us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3431908 posted 9:56 pm on Aug 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

online magazine, with many multi-page articles

That's linear, and a sequential indicator is definitely a huge help in such a case, where it's a magazine type article or an instruction manual, or online books - that have a beginning, a middle and an end.

How would that apply to the internal (or global) navigation structure of most all sites, that aren't at all linear? How does it apply to left navigation, bottom navigation and the structure of single_page_article content sites or ecommerce?

How can it be applied to sites that are not linear or sequential in nature? How do we apply that to the original poster's questions and concerns?

Gshaughn: is yours an article or content site, or an commerce/product-oriented site? What percentage of the site needs to be accessed sequentially, in some kind of order?

[edited by: Marcia at 10:21 pm (utc) on Aug. 28, 2007]

This 39 message thread spans 2 pages: 39 ( [1] 2 > >
Global Options:
 top home search open messages active posts  
 

Home / Forums Index / Google / Google SEO News and Discussion
rss feed

All trademarks and copyrights held by respective owners. Member comments are owned by the poster.
Home ¦ Free Tools ¦ Terms of Service ¦ Privacy Policy ¦ Report Problem ¦ About ¦ Library ¦ Newsletter
WebmasterWorld is a Developer Shed Community owned by Jim Boykin.
© Webmaster World 1996-2014 all rights reserved