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BBC using Youtube?
Youtube video embedded in BBC article
beesticles

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 1:07 pm on Feb 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

Here's something I've not seen before: the BBC using a Youtube video in an article, as well as their usual link to a Real version.

[news.bbc.co.uk...]

I've wondered why the BBC persists with Real to deliver video, when they could use a Flash player, but I didn't expect this.

 

appi2

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 2:08 pm on Feb 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

Ahh good old beeb and their love of Youtube. Watch news 24 far to much and have seen many YT vids.

Won't be long before they start announcing the news with "OMG AMAZING LOOOK".

I think they use Real for those non windows types.

beesticles

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 11:44 am on Mar 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

Looks like you were almost right appi2

The BBC has struck a content deal with YouTube, the web's most popular video sharing website, owned by Google.

Three YouTube channels - one for news and two for entertainment - will showcase short clips of BBC content.

The BBC hopes that the deal will help it reach YouTube's monthly audience of more than 70 million users and drive extra traffic to its own website.

BBC strikes Google-YouTube deal [news.bbc.co.uk]

[edited by: engine at 12:22 pm (utc) on Mar. 2, 2007]
[edit reason] added quote [/edit]

gibbergibber

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 12:55 pm on Mar 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

This should be VERY interesting...

The BBC is very keen on new media, they run by far the best British news site, and arguably the best news site in the world. They perhaps have an easier time embracing new forms of communication because they don't depend on their programmes for an income. For the benefit of non-Brits here, the BBC is almost entirely funded by UK taxes on television sets (they're called "tv licences" but they're really just plain old taxation, like the tax you pay on a car). Every household with one or more sets has to pay a flat tax yearly.

Commercial broadcasters are usually more conservative in producing new medium content despite their independence, because they want to make sure the new medium can pay its own way either now or in the near future. Loss-making public service channels just don't appeal to commercial broadcasters.

davidof

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 1:22 pm on Mar 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

> the BBC is almost entirely funded by UK taxes on television sets

maybe at one time but the BBC has advertising on some of its channels such as World and receives a huge amount of money from programme sales. Some series sell to over 100 countries. In 2005-6 the BBC made over 600 million UKP from these channels which is around a quarter of revenue.

appi2

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 1:41 pm on Mar 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

the BBC is almost entirely funded by UK taxes on television sets (they're called "tv licences" but they're really just plain old taxation, like the tax you pay on a car). Every household with one or more sets has to pay a flat tax yearly.

oooh your bringing up old war wounds for me...

In my student days, I had a black and white tv.

You can buy a colour tv licence, a B&W licence or just a radio licence. So I bought a B&W licence.

Some nice person gave me an old video recorder. Things happened and then I got a fine for having a device that 'recieved a colour signal' even though I couldn't see the damn colour.

Also I think even if you don't have a TV or radio, but use any BBC internet broadcast they can still fine you. (may be wrong on that one but my little brain thinks so.)

gibbergibber

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 2:10 pm on Mar 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

--maybe at one time but the BBC has advertising on some of its channels such as World--

Actually this is a common misunderstanding.

BBC World isn't really a BBC channel despite its branding, it's made for the British Foreign Office, like the BBC World Service on radio. That's why you can't see BBC World in Britain, because it's not meant for British audiences.

Those two services have always been separate from the BBC proper, and have never ever been allowed to receive licence fee funding.

The radio World Service is funded directly by the Foreign Office, and the advertising on the World tv channel is to cover the extra costs of television compared to radio.

--and receives a huge amount of money from programme sales. Some series sell to over 100 countries. In 2005-6 the BBC made over 600 million UKP from these channels which is around a quarter of revenue. --

A quarter is still only a quarter, the BBC could take or leave the money from foreign sales and still be able to make most of its programmes. The BBC isn't dependent on commercial activities and could give them up if it wanted.

Commercial broadcasters get 100% of their money from their programmes, either sales or advertising. They are entirely dependent on commercial activities, without them they'd die.

--Also I think even if you don't have a TV or radio, but use any BBC internet broadcast they can still fine you. (may be wrong on that one but my little brain thinks so.) --

I should think there are currently zero people who don't have a TV or radio but who have a PC at home capable of viewing video streams.

But that may change if they start putting BBC programmes online, it's a very interesting topic.

vincevincevince

WebmasterWorld Senior Member vincevincevince us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 2:59 pm on Mar 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

Anything which helps out the BBC is good by me, so long as it doesn't lead to more dumbing down.

I'm currently in Malaysia and listen to BBC World on Shortwave from Singapore or Thailand. A really good service.

theviruz

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 3:17 pm on Mar 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

YouTube's BBC page is available here: [youtube.com...]
The design is similar with the ones revealed for other two partners, Chelsea FC and NBA.

kaled

WebmasterWorld Senior Member kaled us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 7:41 pm on Mar 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

Also I think even if you don't have a TV or radio, but use any BBC internet broadcast they can still fine you. (may be wrong on that one but my little brain thinks so.)

Forget radios, they haven't been licensed for at least thirty years in the UK.

A TV license is required if you have equipment that can receive broadcasts. Since YouTube clips, etc, are not broadcast (they are streamed/downloaded individually and on demand) no license is required to view them.

Of course, the law is fluid and this could change.

Kaled.

appi2

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 8:42 pm on Mar 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

Knew I'd read it somewhere.
TV licence now needed for internet [out-law.com]

kaled

WebmasterWorld Senior Member kaled us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 11:44 pm on Mar 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

TV Licensing said
If you are watching TV at the same time as it is being broadcast in the UK you need to be covered by a valid licence.

That certainly doesn't cover YouTube. However, just because TV Licensing has an opinion that a TV license is required when watching something on the internet, that opinion is not necessarily enforcable in law.

Kaled.

jonathanellis

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3266602 posted 1:12 pm on Mar 7, 2007 (gmt 0)

[youtube.com ]
I don't think that this user will keep their username for much longer!

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